Effects of chemical pretreatment of Douglas-fir heartwood on efficacy of potential bioprotection agents

IRG/WP 1440

B Dawson-Andoh, J J Morrell

Biological protection against wood decay fungi represents an environmentally attractive alternative to the use of chemicals; however, the process of identifying suitable candidates and the conditions that ensure successful protection pose major challenges. One critical aspect of this problem is to identify organisms that can rapidly and uniformly colonize the wood. Wood contains low levels of nutrients required for the growth of many potential biocontrol agents, particularly in the heartwood. One approach to enhancing colonization by the bioprotectant is to treat the wood with low levels of chemicals that inhibit other microbes or selectively stimulate the bioprotectant. Ideally, these chemicals would be capable of diffusing in vapor or liquid phase through wood that is impermeable to the movement of conventional preservative systems. The feasibility of this approach was evaluated in a small wood wafer test using fluoride and boron, two elements that have been shown to inhibit members of the Basidiomycotina but produce minimal effects on microfungi.


Keywords: DECAY; BIOLOGICAL CONTROL; TRICHODERMA HARZIANUM; POSTIA PLACENTA; TRAMETES VERSICOLOR; PSEUDOTSUGA MENZIESII; STFB; SODIUM FLUORIDE

Conference: 90-05-13/18 Rotorua, New Zealand


Download document (365 kb)
free for the members of IRG.

Order document from secretariat