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Which fungi cause sapstain in Canadian softwoods?
1998 - IRG/WP 98-10285
The Canadian forest products industry suffers considerable losses in revenue due to fungal stains. There is an increased awareness that more complete knowledge about the causal organisms might help solve the problem. A first step was to initiate a thorough survey of bluestain fungi in Canada. Systematic sampling was done at seven selected sawmills in six Canadian provinces. In summer 1997 fresh logs and lumber were set aside a month prior to sampling for fungi. Five commercially important softwoods, Abies balsamea, Picea mariana, P. glauca, Pinus contorta and P. banksiana were included in the studies. The objectives were to identify the main discoloring fungi and subsequently to evaluate the genetic diversity among isolates of the fungal species found to predominate. Fungi isolated from the experimental timber were identified based on their morphological characteristics, measurement of their growth rates, and by testing their mating compatibility with known mating types. A substantial number of isolates and a variety of species were obtained. Most frequently isolated were species from the genus Ophiostoma. A more diverse range of fungi was found in logs than on lumber. Preliminary data suggest that some species tend to predominate on certain wood species and in certain geographic regions but none appeared to be exclusive.
A Uzunovic, Dian-Qing Yang, P Gagné, C Breuil, L Bernier, A Byrne


Programme Section 4
1998 - IRG/WP 98-40126
IRG Secretariat


Programme Section 2
1998 - IRG/WP 98-20148
IRG Secretariat


A discussion on causes, effects and remedies of arsenic pollution of groundwater in Bangladesh
1998 - IRG/WP 98-50102
This paper includes possible causes, effects and remedies of arsenic pollution of groundwater in Bangladesh, extracted mostly from the international conference held in Dhaka in 1998. Next possible key steps have been suggested based on scientific principles and experience. The release of arsenic from underground sediment would be due to excessive mechanical forces, geochemical and geobiological reactions. Arsenic free water will cure acute patients and will save future generations. Use of suitable organic chemicals, organic matters, biological control system would be widely acceptable for supplying arsenic free water. Other natural sources of water can be used easily and safely without mechanical and chemical processes. The problems of chronic patients would be solved genetically, enzymatically and nutritionally.
A K Lahiry


Report of Section 5
1998 - IRG/WP 98-50123
IRG Secretariat


The decay resistance of chemically modified aspen composites to the white rot fungus Coriolus versicolor (L.) Quelet
1998 - IRG/WP 98-40122
Chemical modification of Aspen wood (Populus tremula L.) in the form of solid wood, veneers and sawdust was undertaken by a two step procedure consisting of esterification with maleic anhydride (MA) and subsequent oligoesterification with MA and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) or allyl glycidyl ether (AGE). Modified wood was thermoplastic and was thermally formed by hot-pressing to produce veneer or solid wood samples with smooth glossy surfaces, while plastic-like wafers were obtained by hotpressing modified sawdust. Chemical modification alone was shown to enhance the biological resistance of Aspen to decay by Coriolus versicolor. In addition, hot-pressing enhanced decay resistance of both unmodified wood and esterified wood veneer samples, although no improvement was found by hot pressing oligoesterified wood. The most effective treatment for the improvement of decay resistance was chemical modification of the sawdust in conjunction with hot-pressing. A microscopic examination of chemically modified and control samples following exposure to the fungus showed more extensive colonisation and decay in untreated, unpressed samples.
M C Timar, A J Pitman, M D Mihai


Programme Section 3
1998 - IRG/WP 98-30184
IRG Secretariat


Programme Section 5
1998 - IRG/WP 98-50119
IRG Secretariat


IRG Cannes 98 invitation
1998 -
IRG Secretariat


IRG Cannes 98 Posters
1998 - IRG/WP 98-50101 Posters
IRG Secretariat


Report of Section 4
1998 - IRG/WP 98-40128
IRG Secretariat


Report of Section 1
1998 - IRG/WP 98-10296
IRG Secretariat


Newsletter 1-98
1998 -
IRG Secretariat


Newsletter 3-98
1998 -
IRG Secretariat


Possible regulatory status of treated wood waste and implications
1998 - IRG/WP 98-50101-07
In relation to the European Community or the French regulations, treated wood waste can get two different regulatory status: <<recycled product or fuel>> or <<waste>>. Then, into the waste status, two categories are possible for these residues: <<domestic waste and assimilated>> or <<hazardous waste>>. These different status and categories are important for the environmental issue of treated wood waste management. But they also can have strong economical implications, linked to the waste management cost on one hand and on the materials image on the other hand. On the basis of the EC regulations, up to now, no treated wood waste is namely quoted as <<hazardous waste>>. However, through the classification criteria defined by different EC directives, creosote or heavy metals treated wood waste could be to considered that way. The technical arguments for such a classification and the practical implications are discussed.
G Deroubaix


Comparison of Different Methods for Assessing the Performance of Preservatives in the BAM Fungus Cellar Test
1998 - IRG/WP 98-20149
The fungus cellar test is a common means to get reliable data on the long term performance of treated wood in soil contact. A constantly high humidity and a suitable of water holding capacity for a range of micro-organisms provide high decay rates in untreated wood and produce intensive microbial pressures on wood treated with biocides. Presently a range of biocides are under test in the BAM fungus cellar and the results will be presented for the following types of biocides: Tebuconazole in combination with copper and boron (5 years fungus cellar), quats with copper and boron (5 years fungus cellar) and Cu-organic compound combined with copper and boron (3 years fungus cellar). Figures will be shown on the development of the Modulus of Elasticity (MOE) over the years and on an assessment of the stakes according to EN 252.
I Stephan, M Grinda, D Rudolph


A new wood preservative based on polymerized complexes of aminotriazole with copper acetate
1998 - IRG/WP 98-30169
This paper presents the results of preliminary fungitoxicity tests as carried out on new polymerized complexes of aminotriazole with copper acetate (PCC) against Coniophora puteana and Trichoderma viride. Laboratory tests on wood confirmed the findings arrived at in the screening test on agar medium. Deep penetration into pine wood of compounds studied was observed and particularly so at humidity above the point of fiber saturation (up to 10 mm in manual treatment), as well as good fixation in wood. Together with quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC) a strong synergistic effect towards the microorganisms tested was evident. The formulations investigated in the present study seem promising for future use in the wood preservation. Their practical implementation may enable effective control of wood destroying agents.
K J Krajewski, A Lukasiewicz, J Wazny


Local preservation with difluoride pills: Life-time of preservative
1998 - IRG/WP 98-40127
A brief history of the situation in the Netherlands with respect to the preservation of joinery is given. Already in the eighties in the Netherlands many spruce window frames were treated with difluoride pills. One of the possible disadvantages of this kind of diffusing preservatives is the high leaching rate found in laboratory situations. The leaching rate in practice is influenced by many factors of which the condition of the paint systems and the condition of the glue in the joint are the most important. In this research the difluoride content in wood was analysed in samples which were taken from several buildings. An estimation of the remaining difluoride content leached is given. Related to these figures the remaining life of the protecting agent can be calculated. The results show that even in situations with open joints of paint damage the remaining amount of difluoride is still very high after 10 years. This suggests that in practice the leaching of difluorides is of minor importance.
W J Homan, C Blom, B W Holleboom


Reporting minutes of the Plenary Meeting in 1998
1998 - IRG/WP 98-60097
IRG Secretariat


Report of Section 3
1998 - IRG/WP 98-30186
IRG Secretariat


Report of Section 2
1998 - IRG/WP 98-20152
IRG Secretariat


IRG Cannes 98 Introduction
1998 - IRG/WP 98-50101 Intro
IRG Secretariat


Comparison between actual income and expenditure and the budget for 1997
1998 - IRG/WP 98-60096
IRG Secretariat


IRG Documents 1998
1998 - IRG/WP 98-60098
IRG Secretariat


International Directory of Members and Sponsors 1998-1999
1998 - IRG/WP 98-60106
IRG Secretariat


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