IRG Documents Database and Compendium


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Minutes of the meetings of WG III
1977 - IRG/WP 3103
IRG Secretariat


Agenda Plenary 1977
1977 - IRG/WP 74
IRG Secretariat


The Eighth Annual Report of the International Research Group on Wood Preservation 1976-1977
1978 - IRG/WP 569
IRG Secretariat


Minutes of the meeting of WG IV
1977 - IRG/WP 436
IRG Secretariat


Agenda WG II
1977 - IRG/WP 276
IRG Secretariat


Minutes of the meetings of WG I
1977 - IRG/WP 168
IRG Secretariat


Agenda WG I
1977 - IRG/WP 157
IRG Secretariat


Agenda WG III
1977 - IRG/WP 380
IRG Secretariat


Agenda WG IV
1977 - IRG/WP 425
IRG Secretariat


Minutes of the meetings of WG II
1977 - IRG/WP 295
IRG Secretariat


Minutes of the Plenary 1977
1977 - IRG/WP 77
IRG Secretariat


IRG 9 invitation
1977 -
IRG Secretariat


List of Members and Aims 1977
1977 - IRG/WP 565
IRG Secretariat


Hardwood field experiment: Progress report 1977-82
1982 - IRG/WP 3200
The international hardwood field experiment was planned in 1976 and set up in some 30 different sites around the world. The test stakes include 4 reference species common to each site and in most cases at least 2 species of local importance. It was hoped that a picture of performance of a range of economically important species would be built up and at the same time provide vital background information for people currently engaged in hardwood and soft-rot research. It is felt that these aspirations are more than being achieved and that as time proceeds this trial will prove invaluable in developing our knowledge of wood preservation on a world wide basis. Obviously it proved impossible to set up such a large trial simultaneously. Different sites also inspect their trials at different times and so the data presented is for different periods dependant on the site. For the reference species table 1 gives the latest data from each site and should be considered with report IRG/WP/3164 which gave information at earlier dates. Table 2 gives the performance of the other species for each site and, where stakes were available, for the master site (33) at Imperial college. No attempt has been made to analyse or comment on the results at this time. It is felt that this is a progress report for comment on by the sub-group. However, it is felt that together with the comments received these results should be duly considered for publication elsewhere.
D J Dickinson, J F Levy


Hardwood Field Experiment: Progress Report 1977-1986
1986 - IRG/WP 3391
The international hardwood field experiment was planned in l976 and set up in same 30 different sites around the world. The test stakes include 4 reference species common to each site and in most cases at least 2 species of local importance. It was hoped that a picture of performance of a range of economically important species would be built up and at the same time provide vital background information for people currently engaged in hardwood and soft-rot research. It is felt that these aspirations are more than being achieved and that as time proceeds this trial will prove invaluable in developing our knowledge of wood preservation on a world wide basis. Obviously it proved impossible to set up such a large trial simultaneously. Different sites also inspect their trials at different times and so the data presented is for different periods dependent on the site. The original intention was to fully present the data at year 10 when it is considered the test should be terminated. Two progress reports have been prepared giving details of the reference species (WP3164) and of the mixed species at the master site (WP3200). The sending of results from the various sites has been rather erratic and despite precise instructions, sometimes in a form making it difficult to interpret the results. However, it is felt that this is not a major problem as all the sites will have their own records and the gaps currently in the records should be easily filled in. In view of this we have decided to compile the available results as raw data together with the omissions. This will enable cooperators to check their data and fill in the gaps in their copy of the report and communicate this to the chairman who will pass it on to the other participants. When the final data is added to the records a final report will be written giving a detailed analysis of the data and drawing any necessary conclusions. The full details of the experimental plan are given in IRG document WP/367. However as many people may have misplaced this document the details are summarised here. Each sample was given a code number consisting of 6 digits. The first two digits indicate the participating country and person; the second two digits indicate the species of timber; and the last two digits indicate the treating concentration of preservative and the sample number. With reference to the list in 2.2 the code number 162305 indicates that 16 = Japan, 23 = Crytomeria japonica, 05 = Untreated controls, sample number 5, 2.2 Species list and participants. Due to late inclusion of some species it was not possible to maintain strict numerical order in the allocation of numbers to the species. Were sufficient material was supplied a replicate set of stakes was installed at Silwood Park, Imperial College, Surrey, UK.
D J Dickinson, S M Gray


Wood preservatives. The state of French legislation (June 1977)
1977 - IRG/WP 3106
There does not exist any special legislation for preservatives but general laws may intervene at three levels:-Manufacture -Transport -Selling. In every case, it is based on a poisonous substances classification, an official classification provided by a para-governmental organisation which includes toxicologists. This legislation may refer to other texts: categories of danger for transport (the European legislation is official in France since 1976), classification of professional diseases, classification of activities under regulation, cards from the Institut National de Securite (Safety National Institute) rules from the Securite Sociale (Social Security), laws on dangerous premises, working laws, etc. Practically all these texts result in: - either distinguishing marks on packagings (diversely coloured labels with symbolical drawings, etc); - either respecting some manufacturing precautions; - either, when settling a new plant, some obligations concerning minimal distances from, houses, the nature and shape of the containers, etc. It is necessary to get the agreement of the town authorities on the choice of the treatment site. In the case we are considering, there is no need for official authorisation relative to manufacture, transport or selling. Indeed, the French legislation is quite precise: -either the manufactured products are intended for human consumption directly (pharmacological and agricultural products) or indirectly (fertilizers used for agriculture or food packaging). Then, they must: get a sale authorisation, appear on an official list with their formulation, and in some cases (pharmacology) manufacture and sale site must be authorised too, -either, the manufactured products are not meant for human consumption, even if they can be put in contact with the skin (dies for cloth, beauty preparation, varnishes or paints, etc). It is never necessary to obtain permission to sell provided that packaging laws are respected. It is the same for wood preservatives. In order to simplify the situation, we shall consider successively the three possible fields from the regulation point of view, the three fields mentioned above. In the same way, we shall only consider the three common types of preservatives. -Derivatives from coal distillation (creosotes) -Organic solvent products -Water-borne salts
M Romeis, P Guéneau