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The dry rot fungus and other fungi in houses. Part 2
1993 - IRG/WP 93-10001
J Bech-Andersen


The dry rot fungus and other fungi in houses. Part 1
1992 - IRG/WP 92-2389
J Bech-Andersen


Moulds and indoor climate in Denmark
2003 - IRG/WP 03-10488
Just like in many other countries after the oil crisis in 1972 Danish houses were tightened with the result that the relative air humidity rose considerably. The Ministry of Energy also demanded a lowering of the indoor temperature from 25°C to 20°C with the result that the relative air humidity rose even more. According to the latest survey 10% of Danish buildings are infected with moulds. Moul...
J Bech-Andersen, S A Elborne


Quality control of microwave treatment of timber after dry rot attack
2001 - IRG/WP 01-40205
In Denmark microwave treatment of timber has been used during the last 15 years for eradication of dry rot (Serpula lacrymans). About 1500 microwave treatments have been employed in coorporation with Hussvamp Laboratoriet. Previously all the infected timber was removed plus an extra metre as a safety zone. This meant that all casting boards and plaster had to be removed as well and joists replaced...
J Bech-Andersen, J Andreasson, S A Elborne


The true dry rot fungus (Serpula lacrymans) found in the wild in the forests of the Himalayas
1993 - IRG/WP 93-10002
J Bech-Andersen, S A Elborne, F Goldie, J Singh, B Walker


The dry rot fungus and other fungi in houses. Part 3
1994 - IRG/WP 94-10083
J Bech-Andersen


Theoretical and practical experiments with eradication of the dry rot fungus by means of microwaves
1992 - IRG/WP 92-1577
Engineer Claus Andersen constructed a device in 1986 for microwave treatment of fungal infested timber. The device was tested on ampullae with live fungal mycelium of the dry rot fungus. A 10 minutes treatment at 37°C gave satisfactory eradicating effect. The method has since been used in practice in approximately 100 instances. A spot-test control has shown satisfactory results....
J Bech-Andersen, C Andersen


Review of remediation methods of sites contaminated by wood preservatives - testing of filter material for use in permeable barrier technology
1999 - IRG/WP 99-50141
Several treatment methods are currently available for treatment of contaminated sites. Soil and water can be treated by immobilisation, separation or destruction of contaminants. It has been common to use intensive treatment methods starting with soil excavation to reach strict purification goals. However, technical and financial reasons make it difficult to reach the desired treatment criteria. A...
G Rasmussen, H Iversen, S Andersen


Copper-resistant fungi on pressure impregnated wood in Denmark
1994 - IRG/WP 94-10078
The occurence of Amorphotheca resinae Parbery and its asexual stage Cladosporium resinae (Lindau) de Vries on CCA and CCB treated wood has previously been shown. In the autumn 1993 some other blue stain fungi were found on CCP and CCB treated pine timber, such as Ophiostoma minus (Hedgc.) H. and P. Sydow, Ophiostoma pilifera (Fr.) H. and P. Sydow and Ophiostona piceae (Munch) H. and P. Sydow. The ...
J Bech-Andersen, S A Elborne


The dry rot and other fungi in houses. Part 4
1995 - IRG/WP 95-10124
J Bech-Andersen


The dry rot fungus (Serpula lacrymans) in nature and its history of introduction into buildings
1999 - IRG/WP 99-10300
For many years the True dry rot fungus (Serpula lacrymans (Wulf.: Fr.)Schroet.) has exclusively been found in buildings. That is why it is called the True dry rot fungus. The origin of the fungus has always been a mystery, but a wild ancestor must have occured. In the literature there is some information about finds of Serpula lacrymans in nature, however it is difficult to distinguish it from the...
J Bech-Andersen, S A Elborne


On the biotope of dry rot (Serpula lacrymans) in the wild
1995 - IRG/WP 95-10123
The True Dry rot fungus was found in the Himalayas several times in this century. The finds were able to cross breed with Serpula lacrymans from Denmark and therefore all belong to this species (Harmsen 1960). In order to understand its successful colonisation in buildings we were interested in studying the natural biotope, i.e. the moisture, temperature and soil relationships. All together 15 fru...
J Bech-Andersen, S A Elborne, K Bech-Andersen


Alkaline building materials and controlled moisture conditions as causes for dry rot Serpula lacrymans growing only in houses
1985 - IRG/WP 1272
Dry rot Serpula lacrymans ( Fr.) S.F. Gray is commonly found in houses, though never with certainly in nature, like other wood destroying fungi which grow both indoors and outdoors. In investigating series of dry rot instances it was shown that this fungus is always found in covered places, close to a moisture source, the distance being from 0 a maximum of 600 cm. Owing to the dry rot has been abl...
J Bech-Andersen


Practical experiments with Boracol 10 Rh used as a fungicide in the repair process after attack by the dry rot fungus (Serpula lacrymans)
1987 - IRG/WP 3458
The test is carried out in an old house in Nyhavn, Copenhagen. The roof and the walls close to were heavily attacked by dry rot fungus (Serpula lacrymans) because damage to the zinc covering the frontspice were letting in water to the wood and wall construction. An attack by the dry rot fungus is more complicated to repair compared with other wood destroying fungi because beside the damage on wood...
J Bech-Andersen


Mobility and bioavailability of wood preservation chemicals in soil - actual field measurements
1998 - IRG/WP 98-50101-11
Wood material intended for outdoor use is often impregnated with chemicals to withstand attack from fungi and bacteria. Both inorganic and organic substances are used to protect the wood, and they are used in a toxic and bioavailable form. At wood preservation facilities severe soil contamination can be encountered due to spills and deposition of sludge, especially at old sites. Two sites, one whe...
S Andersen, G Rasmussen


Production, function and neutralization of oxalic acid produced by the dry rot fungus and other brown rot fungi
1987 - IRG/WP 1330
The formation of oxalic acid by the wood-destroying fungi causing brown rot, is found to be the key which by hydrolysing the hemicellulose brings the cellulose in the tracheid wall in contact with the cellulase enzymes and yeld watersoluble sugars leaving only a lignin skeleton. To control the pH in the substrate the excess oxalic acid is precipitated to water insoluble calcium oxalate by the dry ...
J Bech-Andersen


Cancer incidence among CCA exposed workers in the wood preserving industry
1995 - IRG/WP 95-50040-09
CCA wood preservatives - Copper, hexavalent, Chromium and tri-or pentavalent, Arsenic - has been used in the Nordic countries since mid 1930. Trivalent arsenic and hexavalent chromium compounds are toxic and cancerogenic while pentavalent arsenate and trivalent chromium are less hazardous. In impregnation, the compounds of CCA are fixed in the wood as insoluble trivalent chromium and copper pentav...
C-G Ohlson, A Andersen, F G Evans, S Karlehagen, K Nilsson


The true dry rot fungus (Serpula lacrymans) as a wound parasite of living Norway spruce (Picea abies) in the Czech Republic
2001 - IRG/WP 01-10389
Some late 19th century Central European mycologist reported finds of the true dry rot fungus (Serpula lacrymans) from nature. They even suggested that it could be a parasite of living trees. However examination of herbarium material has shown that the species they found was thin-fleshed dry rot (Serpula himantioides) rather than Serpula lacrymans. In 1992 the Czech mycologist Kotlaba reported find...
J Bech-Andersen, S A Elborne, J Andreasson, J Ch Sterler


Serpula lacrymans the dry rot fungus. Revue on previous papers
1989 - IRG/WP 1393
It is found that the Dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans grows in houses only because of its need for basic materials to neutralize the oxalic acid production or heavy metals which celate the oxalic acid. The average distance from the mycelium to the basic materials is found in average to be 14.2 cm with a variation from 0-100 cm. In contrast to Serpula lacrymans the Coniophora puteana and the Rigido...
J Bech-Andersen


Creosote and cancer -Cancer incidence among workers exposed to creosote
1990 - IRG/WP 3572
Creosote is a wood preservative that contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are known to be carcinogenic. Cancer incidence among 919 male workers in Sweden and Norway exposed to creosote in the wood preserving industry was studied. The expected numbers of cases were based on the incidence rates of cancer according to the Cancer Registries of Sweden and Norway. A total of 129 cancer cases...
S Karlehagen, A Andersen, C-G Ohlson