IRG Documents Database and Compendium


Search and Download IRG Documents:



Between and , sort by


Displaying your search results

Your search resulted in 4 documents.


Safe application of copper-chrome-arsenate preservatives
1975 - IRG/WP 377
All wood preservatives contain biologically active substances and must, by design, be in some measure toxic to man. There is nothing fundamentally difficult, however, about using a wood preservative with complete safety. It depends on knowing the risks to health and/or the environment, which the preservative may present, and planning application accordingly. In this paper we examine these and other factors for copper-chrome-arsenate (CCA) preservatives applied in vacuum/pressure plants. We review briefly the toxicological properties of the components and their joint action; the contribution which design and the operation of plant make to safe treatment; also the training of plant operators, to ensure that the potential risks in applying CCAs are fully understood. We shall consider the functions of product labelling; to advisc others - concerned with transport - of the nature of preservatives, especially concentrates. The importance is emphasised of being able, by prior planning, to act swiftly and effectively to deal with any unforeseen emergencies, however infrequent these may be. This paper is not concerned with any risks to man and other animals arising from use of CCA-treated wood. After treatment, fixation leaves the preservative components less readily available as contaminants of the environment.
I N Stalker, P B Cornwell


Modélisation sur maquette du rejet accidentel d'un gaz toxique et inflammable dans l'atmosphere - Emission de type "bouffée d'oxyde d'éthyléne [Water model simulation of toxic and flammable gases in the environment on industrial sites - Puff of ethylen oxide]
1990 - IRG/WP 3576
M Milhe


Proposal for co-operative work. Testing the ability of accidentally introduced tropical insects to survive the cold season in Europe
1976 - IRG/WP 155
By hibernation-experiments in the past it was found that not only the low temperatures may become fatal by freezing. In some experiments we found indications that larvae died by starvation. For example Lyctus africanus-larvae did so in some years with a cold winter (mean above 0°C). If you like to take starvation as a reason for death into account it may be useful to withdraw pieces of infested wood after different times of hibernation or to add new material later.
S Cymorek


Accidental mold/termite testing of high density fiberboard (HDF) treated with borates and N’N-naphthaloylhydroxylamine (NHA)
2003 - IRG/WP 03-10462
High density fibreboard (HDF) was made from beech and pine furnish (50:50) and treated with boric acid (0.1-3%), borax (0.1-3%) or N'-N-(1,8-naphthalyl) hydroxylamine (NHA) (0.1-1%) prior to gluing with urea formaldehyde (UF) resin in order to determine resistance to Eastern subterranean termites (Reticulitermes flavipes Kollar), the most economically important termite species in North America. HDF and southern yellow pine (SYP) sapwood specimens were tested in a modified no-choice soil-block test normally used for fungal decay tests for 5 weeks. Within the first week of incubation, all HDF specimens were heavily overgrown with a variety of mold fungi. This same contamination was not seen in regular SYP specimens tested under the same conditions. Mold contamination did not appear to inhibit termite attack in any measurable way. Weight loss in control HDF specimens was 28% after 5 weeks while weight loss in control SYP was 12% under similar test conditions. Selected treatments with boric acid, borax, didecyl dimethyl ammonium chloride (DDAC) and NHA reduced termite attack in HDF and SYP specimens below 5% weight loss. Synergy was not observed for boron containing compounds and NHA. We conclude that i) soil contact accelerates HDF mold contamination and termite damage in the absence of termidicides ii) HDF made with UF is more susceptible to moisture acquisition and mold contamination than SYP iii) NHA does not act as a mildewcide iv) 3% borates retard both mold and termite damage; and v) HDF is less durable, and requires more preservative to protect, than SYP.
S N Kartal, H H Burdsall Jr, F Green III