IRG Documents Database and Compendium


Search and Download IRG Documents:



Between and , sort by


Displaying your search results

Your search resulted in 172 documents. Displaying 25 entries per page.


Annotated check-list of the Limnoriidae
1990 - IRG/WP 4160
The crustacean isopod family Limnoriidae comprises 51 species of marine borers. A list of species is provided, together with notes on the species known distributions, depth ranges, and habitats. There is also a brief account of the phylogeny of the group.
L J Cookson


Examination of algal and wood extracts for the control of marine borers
1999 - IRG/WP 99-10306
Extracts obtained from a marine alga and white cypress pine (Callitris glaucophylla J. Thompson & L.J. Johnson) were examined for their ability to control marine borers. In a two week laboratory bioassay, filter papers were soaked in 0-8% extract concentrations, dried, and placed with Limnoria quadripunctata Holthuis in Petri dishes containing seawater. The 8% algal extract virtually prevented L. quadripunctata from boring holes through the paper. However, papers soaked in lower algal extract concentrations were attacked. Similar concentrations of C. glaucophylla extract failed to protect the filter papers from L. quadripunctata, despite some initial inhibition. Small blocks of Pinus radiata D. Don treated with the extracts and exposed in the sea were all destroyed within 13 months, except those blocks treated with the 8% algal extract which were just moderately attacked by Limnoria and Teredinids.
D Scown, L J Cookson, R De Nys


Biological screening assays of wood samples treated with creosote plus chemical additives exposed to Limnoria tripunctata
1980 - IRG/WP 408
Laboratory methods for exposure of treated wood coupons to Limnoria tripunctata are described. Chemical additions to creosote were screened using this method. Three pesticides, Endrin, Kepone, and Malathion proved particularly effective. The addition of varying percentages of naphthalene to creosote using several treatment methods are currently being assayed. Results to date show that the coupons treated by the empty cell method have better performance than those prepared by the toluene dilution method. The naphthalene coupons treated by the full cell method show no attack after six months' exposure.
B R Richards, D A Webb


Marine testing of selected waterborne preservatives
1987 - IRG/WP 4137
In 1978 a marine test was established at West Vancouver, B C. to determine the performance of selected waterborne preservatives. The preservatives in test were chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA-C), ammoniacal copper arsenate (ACA), a modified formulation of ACA which contained a higher copper content (modified ACA), ammoniacal copper zinc arsenate (ACZA) and ammoniacal zinc arsenate (AZA). The wood species used for the test was red pine. After eight years in test the CCA is providing excellent performance at all retentions, while the modified ACA is showing significant deterioration only at the lowest level. The ACA is performing quite well although it shows signs of surface deterioration at all retention levels. The performance of the ACZA is rated as unsatisfactory at retentions below 32 kg/m³ while AZA was considered to be unsuitable for use in the marine environment.
J N R Ruddick


Trend in entomology of wood in use and in storage in Nigeria
1978 - IRG/WP 180
The current and potential impact of biotic agents of wood deterioration in Nigeria is reviewed, with emphasis on the insects and marine borers, their recognition and mode of damage. Some essential areas have no doubt been neglected and these are highlighted, while future lines of approach are outlined.
M O Akanbi


Testing of wood preservatives against marine borers (Part 1). Method of testing wood preservatives against marine borers (Part 2)
1971 - IRG/WP 37
P C Trussell, C C Walden


Comité International Permanent pour la Recherche sur la Préservation des Matériaux en Milieu Marin. Information from the Wood Group
1980 - IRG/WP 460
E G B Jones


IRG/COIPM INTERNATIONAL MARINE TEST - to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of water-borne salt preservatives in sea-water. Progress Report 13: Report of fourth inspection (36 months) in Australia
1981 - IRG/WP 481
This report presents the results of the fourth inspection of the IRG/COIPM International Marine Test specimens installed in Sydney Harbour in December, 1977. The inspection took place on 9th December, 1980, after 36 months exposure. Full details of the treatment and installation of the specimens, as well as results of the first three inspections (after 6, 12, and 24 months exposure), have been presented in earlier reports. All inspections of this test have been carried out in accordance with the Working Plan (see IRG/WP/414) except for an X-ray examination of the specimens. This facility is not available at the test station. In conformity with the provisions of the Working Plan, the fifth and sixth replicates of the whole test (i.e. those specimens with '5' or '6' as the final digit of their serial number) were recovered and returned to the United Kingdom after 6 months and 24 months of immersion. Thus, only four replicates remain to be examined at this and ensuing inspections.
J Beesley


IRG/COIPM INTERNATIONAL MARINE TEST - to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of water-borne salt preservatives in sea-water. 2nd Interim Report
1981 - IRG/WP 477
Three reference wood species - Alstonia scholaris, Fagus sylvatica and Pinus sylvestris, untreated and treated with 3%, 6% and 10% CCA and CCB solutions were supplied to all participants for submergence at local sites. Regular examination of samples is being carried out - 6 months, 12 months and then annually for 7 years.
R A Eaton


Studies on the destruction by marine borers of fishing boats along the north-eastern Black Sea coasts of Turkey
1980 - IRG/WP 451
Marine wood-boring organisms are attacking fishing boats along the northeastern coasts of the Black Sea, Turkey. The damage and the intensity of attack of Teredo navalis L in fishing boats were studied.
O A Sekendiz, R Ilhan


IRG/COIPM INTERNATIONAL MARINE TEST - to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of water-borne salt preservatives in sea-water. Progress Report 10 from Naos Island, Panama
1980 - IRG/WP 462
Blocks of 3 wood species, Beech (Fagus sylvatica), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Alstonia (Alstonia scholaris) were exposed at site number 12 at Naos Island, Panama on March 8, 1978 by John R. DePalma. The arrangement of the panels in the exposure site is as shown in Figure 1.
D W French


Wood furfurylation process and properties of furfurylated wood
2004 - IRG/WP 04-40289
The first processes for “furfurylation” of wood (wood modification with furfuryl alcohol) were developed several decades ago. Furfuryl alcohol is a renewable chemical since it is derived from furfural, which is produced from hydrolysed biomass waste. Over the last decade modernised processes for furfurylation of wood have been developed. These new processes are based on new catalytic systems and process additives. Two main processes for production of furfurylated wood have been developed for WPT (Wood Polymer Technology ASA) by the authors – Kebony 100 for high modification levels of hardwoods and VisorWood for lower modification levels of pine. Commercial production according to the Kebony process has been running since August 2000, mainly for flooring. A small Kebony production plant is now in operation in Lithuania. A larger Kebony/VisorWood production plant started up in September 2003 in Porsgrunn, Norway. Several new plants operating according to the VisorWood process, each with an annual capacity of 10 000 m³ or more, are under construction. The properties of furfurylated wood depend on the retention of grafted/polymerised furfuryl alcohol (PFA) in the wood. At high modification levels (high retention of PFA) the enhancement of a wide variety of properties are achieved: an exceptional hardness increase, exceptional resistance to microbial decay and insect attack, high resistance to chemical degradation, increase in MOR & MOE, and high dimensional stability. At lower modification levels many property enhancements also occur, however to slightly lower extent. Notable are resistance to microbial decay and insect attack, increase in MOR & MOE, and relatively high dimensional stability.
M Westin, S Lande, M Schneider


Durability of pine modified by 9 different methods
2004 - IRG/WP 04-40288
The decay resistance was studied for pine modified by nine methods of wood modification: 1) Acetylation, 2) Treatment with methylated melamine resin (MMF), 3) Acetylation followed by post-treatment with MMF-resin, 4) Thermal modification, 5) Furfurylation, 6) Maleoylation (using water solution of MG or ethanol solution of maleic anhydride), 7) Succinylation, 8) NMA-modification and 9) modification with reactive linseed oil derivative (UZA), Wood blocks of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) sapwood were modified in pilot plants. Methods 1-5 were performed by the authors at Chalmers University of Technology or at BFH in Hamburg. Methods 5-9 were part of a European research project (the Chemowood project, FAIR-CT97-3187) and therefore each of these modifications was performed by the project participant responsible for the method. For laboratory testing in TMCs (modified European standard ENV 807) and pure basidiomycete culture bioassays, smaller test specimens were cut from the modified wood blocks. Most of the modification methods were applied on test specimens for marine field testing (EN 275) and some methods to produce mini-stakes for field tests in five Swedish fields. Some modification methods result in modified wood with poor durability, whereas other methods (acetylation, furfurylation and MMF-treatment) seem to provide excellent resistance to microbial decay.
M Westin, A O Rapp, T Nilsson


Exposure trial at tropical marine sites of pyrethroid/creosote mixtures as wood preservatives: Preliminary results
1989 - IRG/WP 4155
Pinus sylvestris sapwood blocks measuring 25 x 25 x 200 mm³, impregnated using a Lowry or Rüping pressure treatment cycle with solutions of permethrin, cypermethrin or deltamethrin in BS144 creosote, have been exposed at marine sites in Australia, Papua New Guinea, the U.K. and Singapore. The effectiveness of these solutions in preventing marine borer attack is being compared with the efficacy of creosote alone, creosote/CCA double treatment, pyrethroids alone and no treatment. Blocks at the tropical sites have been installed in the intertidal zone in areas where the crustacean borer, Sphaeroma is active. Teredinids (shipworms) of several species are very numerous at these sites and the bivalve borer, Martesia, is present. Limnona colonies were found in untreated blocks at the sites in Papua New Guinea and Australia. The results of inspections after exposure periods of up to 26 months at the tropical sites are summarised in this report. Untreated sample blocks failed rapidly to borers, particularly teredinids. Pyrethroids alone reduced the level of crustacean borer attack and to a lesser extent, teredinid attack. All blocks treated with creosote-containing solutions have so far not been attacked by borers or degraded significantly by micro-organisms. Soft-rot and bacterial degradation occurred in untreated blocks and blocks treated with pyrethroids alone. Settlement by barnacles and serpulid worms appears to be inhibited by the creosote/CCA double treatment, but there is no evidence of long-term inhibition of barnacle or serpulid settlement by pyrethroid-containing solutions, whether with creosote or without. Samples at the site in the UK are exposed to teredinid attack. No inspections have yet been carried out at this site.
S M Cragg


IRG/COIPM INTERNATIONAL MARINE TEST - to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of water-borne salt preservatives in sea-water. Progress Report 8: Panama test results
1980 - IRG/WP 458
Summary of damage to ITRG test stakes by pholadidae and teredinidae at the Panama test site - 8 Mar. '78 to 11 Oct. '79
J R De Palma


Vertical distribution of fouling and wood-boring organisms in the Trondheimsfjord (Western Norway)
1981 - IRG/WP 467
Results of a detailed study on the vertical distribution of fouling and wood-boring organisms of Trondheimsfjord at an interval of 3 m from intertidal level to a depth of 30 m, has been presented, based on data collected from two series of panels, exposed from 15 March 1977 to 15 July 1977 (Series I) and from 22 July 1977 to 13 March 1978 (Series II). The intensity of fouling generally decreased with increasing depth. Quantitatively, fouling was heavy on panels of Series I more than on Series II, although species-wise it was more heterogenous on panels of Series II. The bulk of the fouling was constituted by Balanus crenatus, Laomedia sp., Mytilus sp., Modiolus sp. and Hiatella arctica. Incidence of borers and the resultant destruction of timber were heavier on panels of Series II than on those of Series I. The influence of the period of exposure on the above pattern of infestation by foulers and borers has been discussed. Psiloteredo megotara concentrated at the upper levels up to a depth of 15 m, with more settlement between 3 m to 9 m depth. Although Xylophaga dorsalis was present on panels from 3 m to 30 m depth, their intensity abruptly changed from 9 m onwards and continued to increase with increasing depth, with a maximum number near the mud level at 30 m. Attack of Limnoria lignorum also was heavy at the mud level. On the same panel, while Psiloteredo megotara preferred to settle in more numbers on the lower surface, Xylophaga dorsalis did so on the upper silted surface. The importance of such selective vertical incidence of different borers and their co-operation in the destructive activity have been stressed from the point of wood destruction in the Tronheimsfjord. The rate of growth of Balanus crenatus, Laomedia sp., Psiloteredo megotara, Xylophaga dorsalis, and Xylophaga praestans in relation to depth has been presented. For Balanus crenatus rate of growth decreased with increasing depth, while for Laomedia the same increas with depth up to 12 m and declined thereafter. In accordance with its depth preference, Psiloteredo megotara registered faster growth between 3 to 15 m depth. In the case of Xylophaga dorsalis, the size of the shell valve and burrow increased with increasing depth up to 24 to 27 m and then showed a slight decline at 30 m. Factors influencing the growth-rate at different levels have been discussed. The results on the vertical zonation and rate of growth of the wood-infesting organisms encountered, have been compared with relevant literature published earlier.
L N Santhakumaran


A combination of chlorothalonil and chlorpyrifos for more effective wood preservation
1995 - IRG/WP 95-30067
Chlorothalonil (tetrachloroisophthalonitrile) is a highly effective fungicide and wood preservative. Chlorpyrifos (O,O-diethyl O-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyl)phosphorothioate) is an insecticide and is not generally considered to possess significant antifungal activity. However, a review of the literature revealed that chlorpyrifos effects in various ways the activity of microorganisms and is even registered for control of a fungal plant disease. Laboratory and field research trials were designed to study the wood preservative effectiveness of combinations of chlorothalonil plus chlorpyrifos. In some tests the antifungal activity of the insecticide chlorpyrifos was confirmed; however in a fungus cellar test, chlorpyrifos by itself provided little protection. In laboratory termite testing, chlorothalonil was sufficiently effective that in most experiments the addition of chlorpyrifos had little effect, while in field tests the combination consistently outperforms chlorothalonil alone. In tests against various marine borer species, the combination of chlorothalonil plus chlorpyrifos proved superior to chlorothalonil alone. The synergy of chlorothalonil plus chlorpyrifos is demonstrated in field stake tests, where after eleven years in Florida the combination has given superior performance over stakes treated with pentachlorophenol or chlorothalonil alone. Chlorpyrifos alone provided little protection against decay in these field stake tests. Chlorpyrifos is a useful additive to wood preservative fungicides, conferring additional protection against both decay fungi and wood destroying insects.
T L Woods, P E Laks, T C Blewett, R D Fears


Utility, deterioration and preservation of marine timbers in India
2005 - IRG/WP 05-40314
Timber is extensively used in India in the marine environment for various purposes due to its several advantages over modern materials. Infact, its use is increasing in recent years, finding wider and wider applications and this scenario is not going to change in the near future. Though, the bio-deterioration problem is found very severe in tropical waters, still indigenous methods are widely employed for the protection of fishing craft and the present level of chemical treatment is well below 5% of total timber used. This is due to socio economic problems of the potential timber user groups, unavailability of treatment plants in the coastal areas, lack of awareness in user groups, etc. In this paper, types of fishing craft used in the country, timber uses in the marine environment, bio-deterioration losses, research conducted on bio-deterioration aspects at various places and methods applied for the protection of wooden structures are presented.
B Tarakanadha, M V Rao, M Balaji, P K Aggarwal, K S Rao


Marine test of synthetic pyrethroids at Sekondi, Ghana
1981 - IRG/WP 478
The trials reported here are part of a new series of marine exposure tests (Ghana Series 80) begun in October 1979 and designed to assess the natural durability if indigenous timber species and the performance of preservatives and preservative combinations in indigenous wood substrates in Ghana's coastal waters.
F F K Ampong


Report on International Conference on Marine Biodeterioration, Goa, India, January 1986
1986 - IRG/WP 4127
At the International Conference on Marine Biodeterioration - Advanced Techniques Applicable to the Indian Ocean, there were a number of papers relevant to the aims of Working Group IV of IRG. Abstracts of these papers and a brief commentary on the conference are presented.
S M Cragg


Marine borers as wood degraders in Bangladesh and their protection
1996 - IRG/WP 96-10186
Field study on timber piles used in Bangladeshi brackish waters revealed that untreated and pentachlorophenol treated piles drastically degraded by the attack of molluscs and pholads (marine borers). Adequately CCA-C impregnated (30 kg/m³ or 6% W/W dry oxide retention) timber piles can protect the attack of molluscs. It is very difficult to protect pholads which can invade naturally very durable timbers. Adequately preservative treated piles can be protected from pholads by hardening the initial surfaces by noncorrosive metal plates or by cement. Use of only dense and hard timber species would be a solution.
A K Lahiry


An interim report on studies of the tolerance by Sphaeroma (Crustacea: Isopoda) of CCA-treated timber
1982 - IRG/WP 491
In Papua New Guinea any untreated timber exposed to seawater close to mangrove stands is liable to be attacked in the intertidal zone by the crustaceans Sphaeroma terebrans or Sphaeroma triste. Even CCA-treated timber is sometimes vulnerable. The mouth-parts of these animals are adapted for boring, but whether wood particles are ingested remains to be resolved. Some limbs of Sphaeroma terebrans appear to be adapted for filter-feeding. In both species a portion of the gut, the hepatopancreatic caeca, contains cells in which large quantities of copper are concentrated. Specimens of Sphaeroma terebrans taken from CCA-treated piles had an average of 35 mg copper per gram dry weight of hepatopancreatic caeca: the corresponding figure for Sphaeroma triste was approximately 7 mg/g. Specimens of Sphaeroma terebrans taken from mangroves had much less copper in them than those from treated wood. No such clear-cut difference was evident in the case of Sphaeroma triste. Analyses of CCA-treated piles infested with Sphaeroma showed that Cu, Cr and As levels were high at the surface, but that levels in the interior of the pile had dropped since installation Further studies of Sphaeroma gut function are in progress.
S M Cragg, J D Icely


Test procedure to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of different preservatives in sea-wate
1975 - IRG/WP 414
R A Eaton


Report on the treated piles and fenders in the wharves in Port Moresby harbour, and the Huon Gulf, Lae
1977 - IRG/WP 433
To investigate the resistance of Papua New Guinea timber, vacuum pressure impregnated with Copper-Chrome-Arsenic salts, to marine borer attack in the waters of Papua New Guinea.
S M Rayner, C R Levy


Report on marine borer attack on some timbers treated with CCA wood preservative and exposed for three months in sea-water
1985 - IRG/WP 4112
Destruction of timbers by marine borers has long been a problem for the coastal population of Thailand. The use of heavy durable timbers with frequent maintenance, or total replacement, is the only solution for fishermen with their fishing craft or marine installations, meanwhile wharves or other large scale constructions are usually made by using concrete pilings or concrete casings. In recognition of the economic importance of the problem, the Faculty of Forestry with co-operation of the Faculty of Fisheries, Kasetsart University, has set up a preliminary investigation on the marine borer hazards to some timber species, treated and untreated, in order to gather basic information on the performance of test samples and also on the types of attacking organism involved.
A Rananand, W Yoosukh, U Sittiphuprasert


Next Page