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Report of meetings of remedial treatments Sub-group held in Madrid, Spain during 27-28 April 1988
1988 - IRG/WP 3502
J N R Ruddick


Theoretical and practical experiments with eradication of the dry rot fungus by means of microwaves
1992 - IRG/WP 92-1577
Engineer Claus Andersen constructed a device in 1986 for microwave treatment of fungal infested timber. The device was tested on ampullae with live fungal mycelium of the dry rot fungus. A 10 minutes treatment at 37°C gave satisfactory eradicating effect. The method has since been used in practice in approximately 100 instances. A spot-test control has shown satisfactory results.
J Bech-Andersen, C Andersen


Effects of boron treatments on partially decayed oak and pitch pine heartwood
1996 - IRG/WP 96-30106
This paper reports results of borate based preservative treatment and leaching experiments on partially decayed oak and pitch pine heartwood. Previous experiments have shown little damage is caused to sound timber of these types when treated with Polybor and Boracol 20 preservatives. This experiment was carried out to assess the suitability of selected borate based preservatives for use in historical ships' timbers and therefore the physical effects of these preservatives on such timber was investigated. The results indicate that weight losses incurred due to treatment with Polybor or Boracol 20 are no more damaging than those incurred by treatment with water. Weight changes were more apparent in decayed timber than in sound timber with greater uptakes in non-leached samples and greater weight losses in leached samples. However, comparable weight changes were recorded between water treated samples and preservative treated samples. Dimensional changes were minimal in most cases, the greatest found in non-leached Boracol 20 samples as expected. These results indicate that treatment with these preservatives is suitable for partially decayed oak and pitch pine heartwood.
S McCutcheon, G M Smith, J W Palfreyman, P Durrant


The effect of glycol additives on diffusion of boron through Douglas-fir
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30235
Boron is highly effective against a variety of fungi and insects and is able to diffuse with moisture through wood. Diffusion decreases sharply at lower moisture contents, a characteristic that limits the potential use of this material as a remedial treatment for arresting internal decay. One approach to improvi ng boron diffusion is the simultaneous addition of glycol, which is presumed to enhance boron diffusion. In this study, the potential effects of glycol addition were explored by adding glycol plus boron (Boracol 20®, Boracol 40® or BoraCare®) or Timbor® and fused boron (Impel rods®) to produce a desired boric acid equivalent in each pole. Boron movement was assessed by periodically removing increment cores for chemical analysis. All of the supplements improved the diffusion of boron through Douglas-fir wood. Timbor®, which does not contain glycol, resulted in the most even distribution of boron throughout the poles while Boracol 40® seems to have increased boron diffusion to the point of loss from the poles.
C M Freitag, R Rhatigan, J J Morrell


Analysis of the boron content of preservative treated oak and pitch pine heartwood before and after leaching
1992 - IRG/WP 92-3697
Studies to determine the effects, if any, of a variety of boron formulations on heartwood of English oak and American Pitch pine have been previously reported (King et al (1991)). Small wood blocks were treated, at 10°C or 45°C, with borax, polybor or Boracol 20 for periods of 1 month or 4 months then analysed or continuously leached with tap water for a period of 1 month. Reported results showed minor dimensional changes coupled with some weight loss in most test blocks. The boron contents of all blocks have been analysed by the spectrophotometric method of (Williams (1968)). Although an average of 92% boron was lost many of the treated blocks still retained a protective level of boron (>0.04% B). Boron concentrations left in the leached/treated blocks relate to wood species, block orientation, overall weight loss and type of formulation. The results presented in this paper provide further evidence for the applicability of boron formulations to historic timbers and indicate that even in situations of some moisture movement protection may still be afforded by boron treatments.
S McCutcheon, G M Smith, J W Palfreyman, B King


Diffusion treatment of gauged radiata pine timber using "Boracol 20"
1987 - IRG/WP 3437
Green gauged 100 x 50 mm radiata pine timber was preservative treated by brush application of "Boracol 20" followed by diffusion storage. Preservative retention analyses indicated that retention requirements in the core could be achieved within a six week diffusion period, thus representing a time saving of 25% over conventional boron treatment of rough-sawn radiata pine. Similar treatment of kiln dried radiata pine resulted in approximately 5 mm penetration. A longer diffusion period did not result in improved preservative penetration.
D R Page, P Vinden, S Retter


Insect resistance of preservative treated tropical plywood against Lyctus
1990 - IRG/WP 1453
Seven plywood types composed of tropical wood species, vulnerable to Lyctus, were treated with various commercial water-borne and oil-borne preservatives. A wide range of preservative retentions was obtained by treating boards with dip treatment, steeping, double-vacuum and vacuum-pressure impregnations. Selected samples were subsequently tested for their insect resistance against Lyctus africanus during 6 to 8 months according to European Standard EN 20. All control samples were attacked, except one Obeche plywood exhibiting only 50% attack. Water-borne preservative solutions containing arsenic, boron or fluoride could not prevent attack at common retention levels for interior use e.g. lower than 5 kg/m³. Quaternary ammonium compounds showed no insecticidal efficiency, up to 3 kg/m³. TCMTB at 1.5-1.7 kg/m³ proved to be able to reduce slightly the susceptibility for insect attack. Organic insecticides gave the best results, with nearly no attack for plywood treated with lindane or cypermethrin. In spite of a preservative uptake of 25 to 30 kg/m³, endosulfan only could reduce attack by 50%. Protection by permethrin at 0.1% a.i. required a retention of 28 kg/m³. Besides the fact that variability in wood species and composition of the plywood are leading to different retention levels, variation in penetration and distribution of a.i., and as a consequence to a different insect resistance of the impregnated boards, some poor results were directly related to inadequate insecticidal activity and/or concentration of a.i. in some commercial formulations for Lyctus control.
J Van Acker, M Stevens, M Pallaske


Improved PEC preservatives with added biocides
1985 - IRG/WP 3322
Biocidal chemicals have been incorporated into formulations within the broad framework of pigment emulsified creosote (PEC) to provide novel potential multi-purpose preservatives. Preparations of PEC plus TCMTB, Boracol 40, copper ethanolamine nonanoate, Quatramine 80, arsenic trioxide, Troysan Polyphase, and CCA have been formulated and assessed for preserving ability in soil-jar and Accelerated Field Simulator tests. In addition, a cationic oil-in-water emulsion preservative combination of PEC and CCA (PECCA), and an anionic formulation of TCMTB with PEC (PECBUS) have been manufactured in 400 L quantities to treat hardwood pole stubs and pine posts. The results indicate the potential of these improved second generation PEC-based preservatives to provide low-creosote containing treatments able to protect commodities against biodeterioration as well as provide dry, clean surfaces.
H Greaves, C-W Chin, J B Watkins


Testing of alkylammonium compounds
1981 - IRG/WP 2152
Following laboratory soil block tests which showed that Bardac 20 possessed a fungicidal threshold similar to that of chromated copper arsenate, treated ponderosa pine sapwood stakes were installed in a field test site near Vancouver, Canada. Two years after installation all the stakes show signs of fungal degradation. Seven stakes have been removed from the test due to total loss of strength after only two years, and many others are near failure due to extensive decay. It may be concluded from this study, that under the conditions of the test, Bardac 20 has failed to prevent wood-destroying fungi from decaying the stakes. Further investigation of treated "check" stakes and failed field tested stakes has revealed an uneven distribution of the chemical in some stakes treated to low retentions.
J N R Ruddick


Procédé de valorisation par gazéification des bois imprégnés réformés
2001 - IRG/WP 01-50166-20
L'arsenic occupant une place prépondérante dans les biocides employés à l'échelon mondial pour la préservation du bois, il convient d'en assurer le recyclage dans des conditions de protection optimale de la santé humaine et de l'environnement. En France le gisement principal est représenté par les parcs de poteaux en bois supports de lignes électriques basse tension et téléphoniques avec : . 4,5 Millions de poteaux pour EDF dont 1/5 imprégnés CCA et une moyenne de 0,1 millions réformés chaque année, . 15 millions pour FRANCE TELECOM dont 4/5 imprégnés CCA et une moyenne de 0,3 millions réformés chaque année. Les poteaux non traités par des substances minérales sont en grande majorité imprégnés de créosote, produit organique de coupes de distillation des goudrons de houille ou de résidus pétroliers. La créosote est également l'agent d'imprégnation des traverses en bois de chemin de fer dont SNCF réforme en moyenne 0,9 millions chaque année. Une solution industrielle permettant de résoudre, à un coût raisonnable, le problème posé par ces bois imprégnés réformés est vivement souhaitée par l'ensemble des acteurs de la filière bois.
A Lagoutte, A Garnier


Abstracts of some papers received and promised for IRG 20 (89-02-09)
1989 - IRG/WP 5342
IRG Secretariat


Abstracts of some papers and posters received and promised for IRG 20. Part 2 (89-04-21)
1989 - IRG/WP 5346
IRG Secretariat


Diffusion of fused borate rods in top ends of poles
1989 - IRG/WP 3518
Diffusion tests of fused borate rods were carried out on extremities of sapwood poles in service. Rods were set in drills under the cone with or without addition of liquid Boracol 40. After one year of weathering, a good diffusion in the slice under the cone and even below the slice and in the cone itself was observed in Scots pine and spruce poles. The rods were still intacts and constitute, in fact, a reserve of boric acid for the future. This type of treatment would be satisfactory as secondary treatments of poles in service.
D Dirol, J P Guder


Environmental behaviour of treated wood in (semi-)permanent contact with fresh or seawater
1998 - IRG/WP 98-50101-20
This study presents a strategy for the environmental toxicity evaluation of treated wood towards the aquatic compartment, using non target water organisms toxicity tests. A lixiviation process is applied on wood (Pinus sylvestris) treated with several wood preservatives formulations. The lixiviation process is carried out in the laboratory with ultrapure water or synthetic seawater. After chemical analysis for the pesticides migration, the leachates are evaluated for their ecotoxicity. For freshwater, the standard ecotoxicological tests on the luminescence bacteria Vibrio fisheri, the microcrustacean Daphnia magna and the green unicellular algae Raphidocelis subcapitata are used. For seawater, marine tests using organisms such as the microcrustacean Artemia salina and the marine alga Phaeodactylum tricornutum are performed. Then, complementary methods for the detection of mutagenic components (genotoxicity) are applied on wood leachates in order to complete the evaluation. The same chemical treatment is therefore evaluated on fresh and seawater through this laboratory methodology applied to treated wood.
P Marchal, C Martin


IRG/COIPM INTERNATIONAL MARINE TEST - to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of water-borne salt preservatives in sea-water. Progress Report 20: Report on the inspection of specimens at Sekondi, Ghana after 48 months
1985 - IRG/WP 4116
The results of the second inspection of CCA- and CCB-treated test panels exposed at Sekondi, Ghana, in June 1980, are presented. The panels of Pinus sylvestris treated with 3% CCA are stil unattacked after 48 months. Panels treated with 10% CCA and still in test (Fagus sylvatica, Pinus sylvestris and Alstonia scholaris) are still free of attack. Locol species treated with 3% CCB have all been destroyed. Of the panels treated with 10% CCB recovered from the bottom of the sea, those of Ongokea gore were shown by X-radiography to be in various stages of attack by teredinids. One recovered panel of Erythrophleum guineense and four of Mitragyna stipulosa remain free of attack. Teredinids constitute the major hazard.
F F K Ampong, N Asare-Nyadu


IRG 20 invitation
1989 -
IRG Secretariat


Annual Report 2019
2020 - IRG/WP 20-60469
IRG Secretariat


Agenda 2020 Plenary meeting (online)
2020 - IRG/WP 20-60470
IRG Secretariat


Programme. The IRG51 webinar on Wood Protection
2020 - IRG/WP 20-60471
IRG Secretariat


Budget for 2020 (forecast May 2020)
2020 - IRG/WP 20-60472
IRG Secretariat


Budget for 2021
2020 - IRG/WP 20-60473
IRG Secretariat


IRG Documents 2020
2020 - IRG/WP 20-60483
IRG Secretariat


IRG51 Webinar recordings - Day 1
2020 - IRG/WP 20-recordings-1
IRG Secretariat


IRG51 Webinar recordings - Day 2
2020 - IRG/WP 20-recordings-2
IRG Secretariat


Calculation of preformance index of Bardac 20 (an alkylammonium compound) evaluated in a field stake test
1982 - IRG/WP 3206
Bardac 20 treated stakes have been in test for three years at the Westham Island test site near Vancouver, B.C. The Performance Index for the preservative was calculated and found to be 0.009 which infers that, at the standard retention, Bardac 20 added 0.9 y to the life of the stake. It may be concluded that when tested using a standard field stake test using ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws) sapwood at a standard retention of 6.35 kg/m³ Bardac 20 did not fulfil the expectations indicated from the laboratory screening test conducted earlier. Studies are in progress to determine the cause of this discrepancy in performance with a view to improving this class of compound as a wood preservative for use in ground contact situations.
J N R Ruddick


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