IRG Documents Database and Compendium


Search and Download IRG Documents:



Between and , sort by


Displaying your search results

Your search resulted in 2 documents.


Modèles de laboratoire et évaluation des risques. Protocole pour l'étude physiqo-chimique et toxicologique de la thermolyse de bois, de matériaux composites et de végétaux arbustifs
1995 - IRG/WP 95-50040-03
Thermolysis of samples is achieved inside an oven called "Fire model", designed to simulate fire conditions. This fire model was previously designed by the LEMD at the occasion of studies carried out for the purpose of toxicity studies on materials in the conditions occurring at the building level. This model essentially a cubic chamber takes into account the energy of radiation reflexed on the walls in order to meet these building conditions. It is therefore close to the mathematical model with 2 zones of actual fires proposed by the National Bureau of Standards. In that NB Model, a convective heath released by a given source reaches very rapidly the ceiling, but a radiative energy is sent rewards to the bottom, which has the result to give a part of the calories to back to the source. The hot exhaust gases are release at the top, which ensures convection and defines therefore two zones of temperature in the chamber. This model was applied to a series of wooden construction lumber, composites and bush plants.
R Capron, E Leghouchi, M Guerbet, E Dittmar, J M Jouany


The Development of a novel method to preserve reeds using an environmentally friendly timber preservative and a unique engineering design.
2006 - IRG/WP 06-40335
Reeds are used in the construction of bush lodges in Northern Kwa- Zulu Natal, South Africa. Fungal, insect and ultra-violet damage to these reeds is posing a severe problem. Within a space of two years, the reeds are attacked and have to be subsequently replaced; a time consuming and costly exercise. A novel method has been used to successfully preserve these reeds with an environmentally friendly preservative containing disodium octaborate tetrahydrate in a water-based polymer system. The polymer allows for uninhibited diffusion of boron into the reeds, whilst the polymer cures to form a continuous protective film. By making use of two strategically drilled holes, which are 2 mm in diameter, the preservative is introduced into the reed shafts and nodes. The boron successfully diffuses into the walls of the reeds and is prevented from leaching out of the reeds. The water-based polymer provides sufficient protection against excessive ultra-violet damage. The test site, which is situated in the Hluhluwe Game Reserve in Northern Kwa-Zulu Natal – South Africa, has been monitored for nearly two years and there are no sign of insect or fungal damage to the reeds. Over the two-year period, the reeds were periodically inspected for deterioration in colour and deterioration in structural integrity.
K Govender, K G Moodley