IRG Documents Database and Compendium


Search and Download IRG Documents:



Between and , sort by


Displaying your search results

Your search resulted in 3 documents.


Biodegration of treated wood waste by native fungal communities of tropical soil in French Guiana
2012 - IRG/WP 12-50285
Woods have been protected with fungicides for a long time, and the effects of these fungicides on soil after being leached into the ground have turned out to be a true environmental issue. It is in this perspective that we are proposing to study fungal communities of these contaminated woods in a purpose of bioremediation. Most of precedent studies have focused on ability of some Basidiomycetes and white rot fungi to degrade these biocide products. Treated and reference (non-treated) woods samples have been incubated in containers of forest soil in Guyana. The first two samplings of these woods and soils have been realized five months apart. A crop and molecular study allowed us to isolate and identify forty strains of Ascomycetes able to develop on wood and resist xenobiotics. Until now, no Ascomycete was known to resist xenobiotics. Furthermore, a study of fungal communities of the woods and soil were done by D-HPLC and SSCP, and then analyzed by ACP. According to these analyses, biocides are leached in the soil and have an impact on these fungal communities, which are different depending on time of sampling and the way wood is processed.
A Zaremski, L Gastonguay, C Zaremski, F Chaffannel, J BeauchĂȘne, G LeFloch


Non agricultural biocide directive. Practical proposals of implementation in the case where biocides are wood preservatives
1995 - IRG/WP 95-50040-24
This project of non-agricultural biocide directive has currently an extremely wide scope of pre-marketing authorization of substances and preparations used in numerous applications, other than agricultural. Elaborated on the 86/414/EEC model of the phytopharmaceutical product directive, the "NAB" draft directive aims to cover situations as different as plant or wood protection: in the case of plants, there is a need of no residue on the support; in the case of wood, there is an aim of 100% active residue on the support to achieve a 10-50 year service life; for the wood preservation sector, where the regulatory and normative background is already strongly documented, there is an evident need of sectorial adaptation. If it seems widely agreed to homologate substances at the EC level, this is not the case for preparations which represent potentially infinite combinations of substances, to take into account the geographical, climatic and biological discrepancies. The proposals made herewith are to start from a european shopping list of sufficiently known substances, classified in terms of dangers, and move for wood preservatives to the new approach EC system requiring compliance with harmonized standards of risk assessment methodology showing a severity equivalent to that of homologation and checking compliance with health and environment quality criteria. In this model, marketing is initiated under the manufacturer's responsability by using the CE marking. The attestation of conformity for safety uses the same scheme as for quality; the non-conformity with the essential requirements proposed involves withdrawal from the market of the biocidal product involved.
G Ozanne


L-joint based testing for service life prediction of exterior plywood in out of ground contact conditions
2006 - IRG/WP 06-20342
Good biological performance of several plywood types in exterior conditions is most probably related to altered wood moisture behaviour compared to solid wood. Therefore a test set up was developed, using EN 330 L-joint testing methodology, to facilitate differentiation of plywood for exterior applications. The proposed test set up is an adaptation of an accelerated L-joint method introduced by Van Acker and Stevens (2003). Regular L-joints are used to expose plywood specimens as an infill window system. The L-joints simulate bottom corners of a low quality joinery unit. Accelerated testing is based on a moistening device using a drip irrigation system feeding a horticultural rock wool sponge as wetting agent. This keeps the lower corner of the plywood sample wet and creates a moisture gradient in the panel. The specimens are inclined for 10 degrees, the face veneer of the plywood is facing south and inclined 45°. The newly developed exposure method is intended to be severe and acts as a simulation of a worst case situation. The accelerated weathering makes differentiation among several plywood products possible after only one year of outdoor exposure. Visual appreciation of the tested plywood, mass loss measurements, alterations in moisture absorption and desorption patterns and isolations of fungi present on the samples help to rank plywood in view of fit for purpose for use class 3 exposure conditions.
J De Smet, I De Windt, J Van Acker