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Remedial ground-line treatment of CCA poles in service. Results of chemical and microbiological analyses 6 months after treatment
1986 - IRG/WP 3388
CCA-treated poles in service with incipient internal soft rot were remedially treated by inserting borate rods, brushing with a boron/glycol solution and injecting boric acid paste, copper/creosote paste or a commercial product (DFCK paste). The spread of active chemicals in the treated zone as well as the change in microflora have been studied with time. After six months chemicals had spread to most parts of the pole in the ground-line zone and the microflora had been changed - in some cases drastically. The test is still in progress. Chemical and microbiological analyses after 12, 28 and 60 months will be published at a later date.
B Henningsson, H Friis-Hansen, A Käärik, M-L Edlund


Remedial ground-line treatment of CCA poles in service. A final report after 60 months' testing
1989 - IRG/WP 3534
Remedial treatment of CCA treated utility poles of Pinus sylvestris with incipient decay was carried out in 1983 and the results of chemical and microbiological analyses 6 months after treatment were reported in Document No: IRG/WP/3388 while microbiological studies 12 and 28 months after treatment as well as chemical analyses of poles treated with boron rods or boric acid paste 28 months after treatment were reported in Document No: IRG/WP/3481. 60 months after the treatment a final study was carried out on the remaining two poles left from each treatment. The study included isolations of fungi as well as chemical analyses of poles treated with boron rods, boric acid paste and borate/glycol.
B Henningsson, H Friis-Hansen, A Käärik, M-L Edlund


Diffusion of chromium and fluoride in Rentex treated creosoted pole sections
1991 - IRG/WP 3659
A chromated fluoride preservative was applied by injection to the groundline regions of creosoted distribution pole sections and these were erected at a filed site in Scotland. Wood samples were recovered for chemical analysis at one week, two, five and twelve months after treatment. Small sample mass and destructive nature of the analysis necessitated modification of an alkali fusion technique to allow a single analysis for both fluroide and chromium. This paper details the methodology employed and reports on the extent to which diffusion of chromium and fluoride has occurred. The implications on the efficacy of the preservative formulation for use in distribution poles is discussed.
D C R Sinclair, G M Smith, A Bruce, B King, H J Staines


Comparison of the anti-fungal efficacy of Cobra with drill perforation on oscillating pressure treated spruce transmission poles -Laboratory test
1988 - IRG/WP 3469
A laboratory method for measuring the depth of penetration of the fungicidal concentrations effective against basidiomycetes (brown rot) was developed. The tests on CCB oscillating pressure treated spruce transmission poles have shown that the depth of salt penetration can be increased by about 10 mm by a drill perforation before the impregnation. An even better penetration is reached, however, if an additional COBRA process with "Wolmanit-B-Mischung" is applied after the oscillating pressure treatment. In this way the entire cross section of spruce transmission poles is protected except for a core diameter of 30 mm.
E Graf, B Zgraggen


A field evaluation of chromated fluoride as a remedial treatment for creosoted wooden distribution poles
1989 - IRG/WP 3556
A commercial chromated fluoride formulation was applied by injection process to previously inoculated creosoted wooden distribution pole sections at a field site in Scotland and appraisal of the efficacy of the formulation against Lentinus lepideus was undertaken at two month and fifteen month intervals. Preliminary results suggest a rapid elimination of organisms from colonised areas. The usage of the chromated fluoride formulations as a remedial process for creosoted wooden poles is discussed.
B King, A Bruce