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A medium for mass culturing of a bamboo boring beetle Dinoderus minutus Fabricius
1983 - IRG/WP 1182
The bamboo is a traditional product of Japan. But its susceptibility to insects is one of the most important problems. The author has found that for the determination of the effectiveness of insecticides it is very easy to obtain sufficiently numerous adults of Dinoderus minutus by using Buckwheat Cake. The Buckwheat Cake is prepared with buckwheat flour and thin paper. The author has previously found that Buckwheat Cake is suitable for the culturing of Lyctus brunneus and these results were presented in 1981. In culturing Dinoderus minutus, Buckwheat Cake has been found to be also easier and fasting in bringing forth the adults than natural bamboo.
K Suzuki


Laboratory culturing and decay testing with Physisporinus vitreus and Donkioporia expansa orginating from identical cooling tower environments show major differences
1996 - IRG/WP 96-10184
Both Basidiomycete fungi Physisporinus vitreus (Pers.:Fr.) P. Karst. and Donkioporia expansa (Desm.) Kotl. & Pouz. were isolated from identical cooling tower environments. Azobé heartwood (Lophira alata), a very durable tropical wood species was totally deteriorated in cooling towers in a similar way by both fungi. First attempts to culture Physisporinus vitreus in laboratory circumstances showed a need for climatic conditions with higher temperatures and higher relative humidity compared to standard conditions known for most Basidiomycete fungi. Moreover there is a supplementary need to alter the acidity of the malt-agar medium and to add a protein nitrogen source like pepton. Identical culturing conditions were supposed for the Donkioporia expansa isolate. However the alteration in acidity is not beneficial for the growth of this cooling tower fungus. High mass loss figures up to 50% were recorded for non-durable wood species inducing wood moisture contents of over 150%, but only a slight growth stimulation on azobé could be observed under laboratory conditions.
J Van Acker, M Stevens


Preliminary attempts towards the development of a small scale termite rearing chamber. Progress report
1983 - IRG/WP 1203
The results suggest that there is no evidence that the volume of the rearing chamber plays a part in the settlement of a colony. These rearing chambers present a factor of productivity (final enumeration)/(initial enumeration) of roughly 2 after one year. 90% of the colony survived. This method of breeding can be considered as feasible and cheap.
M Argoud, J C Palla, R Sternalsky


Preliminary attempts towards the development of a small-scale termite rearing chamber
1982 - IRG/WP 1148
The paper suggests how to prepare a small-scale rearing chamber for termites which might be used for testing the effectiveness of possible termiticides. A technique for breeding the termites is suggested.
M Argoud, J Mocotte, R Sternalsky


The preventive actions of three commercial wood preservatives against Dinoderus minutus
1984 - IRG/WP 1233
Dinoderus minutus is one of the most common pest insects for the bamboos. For preventing the damages of this insect, the preventive treatment of bamboos with preservatives is necessary. But because of the environmental reasons, only limited insecticides are available in Japan. The author determined the preventive effects of three commercial products against Dinoderus minutus by the medium of the Buckwheat Cake and also by a bamboo (Phyllostachys bambusolides). The results obtained were severer than ones of Lyctus brunneus. In the case of dipping treatment of the bamboo, Fenitrothion is more effective than two other preservatives (Chlordane and Phoxim).
K Suzuki


Methods of culturing Lyctidae
1980 - IRG/WP 1126
Members of the tropical countries in the IRG Sub-Group "Insects in dry wood" requested a paper on the breeding of lyctids. Compared with other wood boring insects, such as cerambycids and anobiids, the breeding of lyctids is not as difficult and time consuming. Nevertheless some basic principles have to be observed in the laboratory to obtain successful cu·ltures. It is the intention of this report to give some guidelines for breeding powder-post beetles although I am aware of the fact that a lot has been published in this field.
H Kühne


Old and new facts on the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans
1991 - IRG/WP 1470
The article collates some of the recent literature on the biology of the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans. The fungus can grow at 28°C, and maximum wood moisture is above 55%. Serpula Iacrymans degrades crystalline cellulose. The intensive production of extracellular oxalic acid is neutralized by calcium and iron. There is considerable variation among the strains with regard to factors such as growth rate, wood decay and response to preservatives. Possible alternative methods of eradication involve interference with the metabolism of nitrogen and sugars. Gel electrophoresis of mycelial proteins and immunological procedures provide valuable supplementary means of identification. Fruit-bodies can be obtained regularly in artificial culture. Inter-stock breeding of monokaryons to dikaryons up to the third generation shows differences among cultures with regard to growth, reaction to temperature, rate of wood decay and resistance to chemicals
O Schmidt, U Moreth-Kebernik


A rearing procedure for the house longhorn beetle Hylotrupes bajulus L
1973 - IRG/WP 228
The technique practised at the Princes Risborough Laboratory for culturing Hylotrupes bajulus is described. It is modified from methods previously suggested by German workers. A protein and vitamin enriched wood diet to accelerate larval growth is employed and larvae are subsequently given a period of cool storage to induce pupation. Adults are confined in groups with prepared surfaces for egg laying: batches of eggs are removed daily and incubated over trays. Egg larvae fall into the trays as they hatch and are used for experimental work or for starting new cultures. The cycle takes under a year and adults, eggs and larvae can be available at any time throughout the year.
R W Berry


The Impact of Cryopreservation Techniques and of Water Quality on the Wood Degrading Ability of Fungal Strains: Recommendations for Maintenance and Culturing Procedures
2018 - IRG/WP 18-20636
In order to establish an optimal cryopreservation method, strains of Basidiomycete and Ascomycete fungi, which are among the most frequently used for wood durability testing, were evaluated using three cryopreservation procedures at -80°C. The main objective was to prevent decrease of the fungal virulence that may occur due to repeated routine sub-culturing procedures and to optimize the reactivation percentage of the strains, which is a particularly challenging issue in the case of Basidiomycetes fungi. In addition, the influence of the quality of water used for the preparation of the culturing malt agar medium on the mycelium growth and on the virulence of fungal strains was assessed. The vitality of all fungi was successfully preserved with cryopreservation at -80 °C during six months in sterile water with 25% or 50% of glycerol used as cryoprotectant. These two cryopreservation techniques negatively influenced the wood degrading ability of five Basidiomycete strains (out of the nine studied) that were tested for virulence after reactivation. Our findings suggest that the tested cryopreservation protocols are not suitable for long-term preservation of all Basidiomycetes species involved in standardized durability testing. However, they were found suitable for the tested strains of Rhodonia placenta, Coniophora olivacea and Trametes versicolor, which are commonly used in standardized efficacy tests. No general pattern was found regarding the optimal type of water, among the three types tested, used for the preparation of the fungal culture medium. The growth rates and virulence measured by mass loss of small-size wooden blocks varied between the strains exposed to the same culturing conditions. These results demonstrate the importance of species-specific optimization of laboratory culture conditions and maintenance procedures with regard to the fungal strains used.
A Stum, M Montibus, I le Bayon, M Kutnik