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A direct basidiomycetes test methodology. Report on an EWPM ring test
1988 - IRG/WP 2306
Results of an EWPM-ring test using a direct basidiomycetes test methodology are reported. The test is caracterized by using big test blocks and infestation by infected wood under unsterile conditions. The test procedure needs further development work, but the results are so promising that co-operation with CEN and EHC is initiated with the purpose of recognition and standardization.
B Jensen


Statistically stable models for determination of PEC
1999 - IRG/WP 99-50135
In June 1998 the European Wood Preservative Manufacturer's Group prepared a document to support the Technical Guidance concerning the placing of products on the market with respect to the Directive 98/08/EC (BPD). The essentials of this document were presented at the COST E2 meeting in Cannes last year and at the following IRG conference (Baines and Davis, 1998; IRG/WP/98-50101/20). The document presented a protocol in which a "tiered" approach is followed. The key-factors in this approach are the PNEC (predicted no effect concentration) and the PEC (predicted environmental concentration). The PNEC is calculated from eco-toxicity test results and a safety factor is introduced. In the case of metals which may also be essential trace elements, the background level is suggested as the PNEC, if this level is above the level derived f rom eco-toxicity tests. The calculation of the PEC uses different models. The focus of this paper is the reliability of the models used to determine the PEC, while pointing out that only data and models relevant to the field situation may be used. In the EWPM protocol, initially the environment has to be defined by going through flowcharts and providing an answer of "YES or NO" to each of the questions. In the first tier of the questions there are two options for the treated wood, which is likely to be treated with the candidate wood preservative. It can be assessed as presenting either: a) No risk to the environment, or b) Additional information is required and the next "tier" of questions or tests is involved. In this paper the model for a fresh water environment is presented as an example. However, the models and the systern, can also be applied to other environments. In the above mentioned flowcharts the following assumptions are made: 1.Yes, the substance is toxic and harmful, 2. Yes, if all of the substance in the treated wood entered the water, its concentration would probably be > the PNEC, 3. Yes, the treated wood is in a situation where some of the substance is likely to get into the water. For this reason a simulated exposure test would be carried out and: 4. Yes, the chemical analysis of the wash-off water would be possible and relevant. Therefore PECwater values would need to be calculated to solve the question whether PECwater> PNECwater. By definition, the PEC must be based on the same principle as the PNEC. This implies that the PEC must be relevant for long term exposition, as the PNEC is a long term value, derived from chronic studies.
W J Homan, A L Van Oosten Van


The EWPMG proposal for the environmental risk assessment of wood preservatives
2001 - IRG/WP 01-50166-09
This paper reviews the protocol prepared by the European Wood Preservative Manufacturer's Group, which could be used by an applicant for product approval under the Biocidal Products Directive 98/8/EC, to produce a risk assessment for an active substance or product in the Product Type 8 Wood Preservatives, in support of the application. The background and scope of the protocol are reviewed. The principles of environmental risk assessment are reviewed with particular reference to wood preservatives. The protocol is described and an example flowchart is included.
E F Baines


International co-operation in wood preservation research
1979 - IRG/WP 3145
If one searched the literature, one could find many examples of international co-operation in the field of research in wood preservation. For example, individual workers in different countries in Europe have got together and made replicate tests with both fungi and insects on various preservatives of common interest and their results have been published. Much co-operation has not had its results published. Over the years, for example, at the old Forest Products Research Laboratory, overseas countries have sent both their own timbers and their own students to study these where all the facilities have been available, and this sort of exercise has gone on in many lands. There have been exchange visits of research workers from country to country, but these are all examples of individual items of co-operation. In this talk, however, we will have to confine our discussion to organized international co-operation. I will give some remarks about the largest organization in this field, viz. the International Research Group on Wood Preservation (IRG) at the end.
R Cockcroft