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Degradation of resin constituents in various wood species by the white rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55
1999 - IRG/WP 99-10301
In previous studies, the white-rot fungus Bjerkandera sp. strain BOS55 was shown to cause extensive degradation of lipophilic extractives (resin) in Scots pine wood. Further research was carried out in order to investigate the ability of Bjerkandera sp. for reducing resinous constituents in various softwood (Douglas fir, larch and spruce) and hardwood species (birch, beech and poplar). The greatest resin reduction occurred in beech (79% in two weeks). High levels of resin elimination were also observed in softwood species like spruce (36%) or Scots pine (35%), as well as in hardwood species like poplar (32%) or birch (24%). In contrast, Bjerkandera sp. only caused a negligible loss of resin components in Douglas fir wood chips. HPLC analysis of acetone extracts from control and fungal-treated samples showed a rapid elimination of triglycerides, diglycerides, free fatty acids and sterols. Toxic constituents in softwood species like resin acids were partially removed in Scots pine, spruce and larch (29-34% in two weeks).
J Dorado, T A Van Beek, F W Claassen, R Sierra-Alvarez


Influence of aliphatic acids on spore germination of wood decay fungi
1984 - IRG/WP 2224
Influences of eight saturated fatty acids (C5-C10, C12 and C16) on spores of four isolates of wood decaying basidiomycetes (white rot fungi: Poria tenuis and Trametes hispida; brown rot fungus: Gloeophyllum trabeum [two isolates]) were observed in-vitro. Spore response after 24 hr on malt extract agar containing 10, 10² , or 10³ ppm of each fatty acid included: no effect on normal germination, delayed germination or restricted mycelial growth, vacuolation and degeneration of spore cytoplasm, or germination inhibition without loss of spore integrity. C7-C10 acids destroyed spores of all fungi at 10² ppm whereas spores remained 'intact' at 10³ ppm of the same acids. C12 destroyed spores of the brown rot isolates but not the white rot fungi, and C16 lacked effect on all fungi at all concentrations. C5 and C6 destroyed spores only at 10³ ppm.
E L Schmidt


Effect of fatty acid removal on treatability of Douglas-fir
1993 - IRG/WP 93-40008
Treatment of Douglas-fir with chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA) poses a major challenge. Several hypotheses based on the anatomical aspects as well as chemical reactivity of the preservative formulations with cell wall constituents and deposits have been proposed. Techniques to prevent pit aspiration or slow fixation reactions have, however, not significantly improved treatment. The presence of high molecular weight fatty acids have been reported to be responsible for higher hydrophobicity in some wood species. These acids can react with Cu+2/Cr+3 ions to form insoluble metallic soaps, thereby immobilizing Cu/Cr and increasing wood hydrophobicity by a mechanism similar to that employed in paper sizing. The effect of fatty acids on treatability was explored by removing these components via several extraction methods. In general, extracted wood had higher gross solution absorptions and chemical retentions, but preservative penetration was largely unaffected. The results suggest that removal or disruption of fatty acids can improve treatability of Douglas-fir heartwood.
S Kumar, J J Morrell


Screening of fungal strains for wood extractive degradation
1998 - IRG/WP 98-10254
Fungal strains were screened for their ability to degrade apolar extractives in wood from scots pine. The degradation of total wood extractives by 91 different strains was monitored in stationary batch assays incubated for 6 weeks. The results obtained show that the ability of wood-inhabiting fungi to utilize wood extractives varied greatly, even for different isolates of the same species. Fungal pretreatment provided up to 70% total resin reduction. Outstanding strains included mainly white-rot fungi. Several sapstain strains were also efficient extractive degraders. Apolar extractives are well known for their inhibitory effect to fungal growth. However, our findings show that wood extractives can serve as carbon source for numerous wood-inhabiting fungi. Furthermore, these results indicate the potentials of wood-inhabiting fungi in biotechnological processes for pulp and paper manufacturing, ie., wood chip depitching and biodetoxification.
J Dorado, M J Martinez-Inigo, T A van Beek, F W Claassen, J B P A Wijnberg, R Sierra-Alvarez


Wood preservation by a mixed anhydride treatment: Using simple models of polymeric wood compounds
2008 - IRG/WP 08-30457
Treatment of wood by a mixed aceto/oleic (or other fatty acid residue) anhydride promoted as a safe and environment friendly wood preservation system has been examined quantitatively by liquid phase 13C NMR and solid phase MAS-DEC (proton decoupling) 13C NMR through all its different stages to determine which reactions occur with simple model compounds of the polymeric constituents of wood. The preparation of the mixed aceto/oleic anhydride under different conditions has been followed too. The anhydride forms but its percentage yield was found to be of the order of only 30%. The mix composed of unreacted acetic anhydride, the mixed aceto/oleic anhydride, and great proportions of free acetic acid and free oleic acid which is used for wood preservation yields acetylation of the lignin model compound (i) by reaction of the acetic anhydride with it and (ii) by reaction of the acetic part of the mixed anhydride. In this reaction the whole mixed anhydride is consumed and nothing of it is left. The oleic part of the mixed anhydride apparently is not able to form esters on lignin being far less reactive than the acetic part. Carbohydrates appears much less readily esterified, being polar enough to be repellent to the oleic residue, some acetylation occurring and some traces, and no more than traces, of carbohydrates oleic acid ester occurring too under some conditions. This system of treatment through a mixed anhydride boils down to being just an acetylation with acetic anhydride, mixed with some oleic acid as water repellent, both already known processes.
F Lyon, M-F Thevenon, A Pizzi, G Tondi, A Despres, J Gril, S Rigolet


Above Ground Field Evaluation and GC-MS Analysis of Naturally Durable Wood Species
2012 - IRG/WP 12-10764
Nine wood species are being evaluated in above ground field studies in Mississippi and Wisconsin. Candidate naturally durable wood (NDW) species are being rated at yearly intervals for resistance to decay, cupping, and checking. Field ratings after 12 months exposure are presented. To date, Paulownia tomentosa (PAW) and southern yellow pine (SYP) are least durable and cedars are the most durable in above ground exposure. Wood samples are being taken from the deck-boards and subjected to chemical analysis using GC-MS. Fatty acids from NDW species were extracted, derivatized, and analyzed along with commercial fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) standards. With few exceptions, results indicate that FAMEs are more abundant in NDW species. However, preliminary bioassays found no inhibition of select wood decay fungi by FAMEs at naturally occurring concentrations.
G T Kirker, A B Blodgett, S T Lebow, C A Clausen


Application of suberin fatty acids extracted from birch bark for wood coating
2021 - IRG/WP 21-40914
It is well known that chemical modifications to improve decay resistance also reduce the equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of wood. The mechanism of this action, however, has been the subject of much debate. Several groups have suggested that decay resistance is a result of lower diffusion rates of fungal degradation agents through the wood cell wall. A recent paper explained the fundamental principles governing diffusion through the wood cell wall. This current paper summarizes the findings in that paper with respect to decay resistance of modified wood. In short, large scale motions of the amorphous polysaccharides of the wood cell wall are necessary for diffusion of degradation agents during incipient decay. Many wood modifications are likely preventing decay by preventing these motions. Water promotes large scale motions of cell wall polysaccharides by increasing free volume, increasing the distance between polymer chains, and reducing the number of hydrogen bonds between polymer chains.
A Kumar, Risto Korpinen, Veikko Möttönen


Biological assessment of bio-based phase change materials in wood for construction applications
2022 - IRG/WP 22-40935
Solid wood can serve multi-functionality for energy savings in buildings. The study reveals the results of bio-deterioration and degradation of solid Scots pine wood used to incorporate single or multicomponent fatty acid mixtures as bio-based phase change materials (BPCMs). The sapwood samples were impregnated with capric acid (CA), methyl palmitate (MP), lauryl alcohol (LA) and a mixture of coconut oil fatty acids and linoleic acid (CoFA-LA). The samples were tested against subterranean termites by an Italian species (Reticulitermes lucifugus), the wood boring beetle Hylotrupes bajulus and mould through a discoloration test. Tested against termites, the impregnated samples were significantly less susceptible to the attack than the controls, i.e. the tested BPCMs were resistant to R. lucifugus. The only test with MP terminated at the moment against H. bajulus showed positive results with no larvae survived. The mould discoloration test revealed that the wood impregnated with CoFA-LA was identically susceptible to mould discoloration when compared to the control, non-impregnated samples. This pioneer study verifies that solid wood employed for encapsulation of BPCMs for building purposes can serve identically or somewhat better than similar wooden building elements regarding attacks of the above microorganisms and insects. Such multifunctional building elements will be tested further in a pilot scale building to characterize better the durability aspects of the new materials.
S Palanti, A Temiz, G Köse Demirel, G Hekimoğlu, A Sari, M Nazari, J Gao, M Jebrane, T Schnabel, N Terziev


Preliminary study of the fungicidal and structural variability in copper naphthenates and naphthenic acids
1996 - IRG/WP 96-30114
Copper naphthenates, an oil-borne wood preservative listed by the American Wood-Preservers' Association (AWPA), is manufactured by complexing copper(II) with naphthenic acids. Prior to AWPA listing as a wood preservative, field experiments showed that copper naphthenates generally had good stability and were active against wood-destroying organisms. Recently, however, there have been reports of some copper naphthenate-treated poles rapidly failing. One possible explanation for the varying effectiveness could be that the structure, and resulting biological activity, of the naphthenic acids used to make copper naphthenate may vary. To test this hypothesis several naphthenic acids and copper naphenates were obtained and their fungicidal activity against three wood-destroying fungi measured. In addition, the chemical structure of the naphthenic acids were examined by proton- and carbon- NMR. Different activities were observed, especially against a copper-tolerant fungus. Some apparent correlations were seen between the fungicidal activity and chemical structures for the few samples studied.
T Schultz, D D Nicholas, L L Ingram Jr, T H Fisher


Durability of larch (Larix spp.) wood against brown-rot fungi
1997 - IRG/WP 97-10228
Durability of the heartwood of Larix decidua, L. sibirica, L. gmelinii, L. gmelinii var japonica, L. gmelinii var olgensis and L. sibirica x decidua against brown rot fungi Coniophora puteana, Poria placenta and Gloeophyllum trabeum was tested according to EN 113 test method. Parallel samples were used to study the amount and composition of wood extractives. The sample trees originated from the research forest of Punkaharju Research Station. The average age of the trees was 60 years. In addition, from L. sibirica also trees at 25 and 102 years were used. Results show that the durability of larch is depending on species, age of the tree, the wood part (inner or outer heartwood) and fungus. The average durability of larch heartwood was equal to class 3 or 4 (moderately or slightly durable, according to the standard EN350:2) and comparable with the durability of pine heartwood (Pinus sylvestris L). However, the durability of L. gmelinii var olgensis and L. sibirica (102 years old) was on the higher level than that of the other studied species but the durability varied even within the same board. Also the durability of wood from L. sibirica grown in the Russian side (Siberia) was studied. It was equal to that of the trees grown in Finland. The average amount of resin acids of larch heartwood was only about 0.1% (dry weight). In contrast, the heartwood of scots pine may contain up to 4.0% of resin acids. Resin acids are found to inhibit the linear growth of certain fungi. Interestingly, the largest amounts of resin acids (0.3%) were found in the heartwood of L. gmelinii which also showed high durability. The concentration of water soluble extracts (mainly arabinogalactan) of larch heartwood was quite large, varying between 3.2 - 20.5%. The concentration of water soluble extracts in the heartwood increased along the age of the trees. Lowest level of extractives were found in Larix decidua which was also the least decay resistant species. The durability of wood in different targets and the role of different chemical compounds of larch heartwood on decay resistance needs to be clarified.
H Viitanen, L Paajanen, P Saranpää, P Viitaniemi


Addendum to Document No: IRG/WP/428
1977 - IRG/WP 437
A J Emery


An investigation into the stability of TBTO in LOSP-treated radiata pine
1987 - IRG/WP 3459
Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and reverse phase paper chromatography were used to characterise the organotin compounds found in radiata pine treated with bis (tri-n-butyl) tin oxide (TBTO). Preliminary results indicate that the preservative is remarkably unstable in wood after light organic solvent preservative (LOSP) treatment. Significant decomposition of TBTO occurs in a matter of hours. White crystalline material observed on the surface of treated wood was identified as tributyltin acetate (TBTA). Other tributyltin esters, dibutyltin ethers, and butyltin chlorides were also identified.
K J Archer, R Meder


The formation of organotin carboxylates in bis(tributyltin) oxide - treated Pinus sylvestris sapwood
1990 - IRG/WP 3618
Tributyltin compounds have been successfully used for many years as wood preservatives, although their chemical nature in timber have not been fully elucidated. This study by 119Sn and 13C NMR spectroscopy has shown that, on impregnation into Pinus sylvestris sapwood, bis(tributyltin) oxide, (Bu3Sn)2O, is rapidly converted to tributyltin carboxylates, Bu3SnOCO·R, via reaction with components of the wood resin. It is further suggested that the formation of these species is a prerequisite for the known disproportionation reaction which occurs in (Bu3Sn)2O - treated timber.
S J Blunden, R Hill


Susceptibility of angiosperm sapwood to white-rot fungal colonization and subsequent degradation: a hypothesis
1997 - IRG/WP 97-10211
It has long been recognized that angiosperm sapwood in nature is relatively easily and preferentially degraded by white-rot fungi. This susceptibility to white-rot fungi is generally believed to be mainly caused by the structure and concentration of angiosperm lignin. However, an explicit explanation as to why lignin structure makes a particular wood vulnerable to white-rot colonisation and subsequent degradation has apparently never been given. We propose that free phenolic groups in wood, such as those present in the lignin or heartwood extractives, can act as free radical scavengers (antioxidants) which disrupt the various white-rot free radical degradative mechanisms. Consequently the presence of a relatively high free phenolic "density", such as that present in gymnosperm sapwood or angiosperm heartwood, may inhibit white-rot degradation. Conversely, white-rot fungi may find wood with a relatively low free phenolic content, such as angiosperm sapwood, easy to colonize. The complex structure of angiosperm wood, in which different cell types have different amounts and types of lignin -- and consequently different levels of free phenolic "densities" -- influences the susceptibility of angiosperm wood to initial white-rot colonisation and, perhaps, also the subsequent decay rate. In addition to the free phenolic ``density" other factors, some as yet unknown, undoubtedly also affect the decay resistance of a particular wood.
T Schultz, D D Nicholas


The effect of low molecular weight chelators on iron chelation and free radical generation as studied by ESR measurement
2000 - IRG/WP 00-10367
The focus of this work was to improve our current knowledge of the non-enzymatic mechanisms involved in brown-rot decay. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), also known as Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR), is an attractive technique for the identification and study of chemical species containing unpaired electrons (such as radicals and certain transition metal species). ESR spin-trapping techniques are also commonly used to study very reactive and short-lived free radical species. It has been proposed that low MW chelators as well as Fenton reagents are involved in wood brown-rot decay, at least in early non-enzymatic stages. In this work, the binding between a chelator model compound and ferric iron was studied by ESR spectroscopy. The effects of the chelator model compound, Fenton reagents, as well as the reaction conditions on free radical generation were also studied using ESR spin-trapping techniques. The results indicate: 1. The relative amount of ferric iron bound to chelators is directly related to the chelator / iron ratio in the system. The relative quantity of the chelator-iron complex can be determined by measuring the intensities of the characteristic g4.3 ESR signal. 2. The effects of the chelator/iron ratio, the pH, and other reaction parameters on the hydroxyl radical generation in a Fenton type system could be determined using ESR spin-trapping techniques. 3. Data support the hypothesis that superoxide radicals are involved in the chelator mediated Fenton processes.
Yuhui Qian, B Goodell


The use of ESR spectroscopy to assess the photostabilising effects of wood preservatives
2000 - IRG/WP 00-20186
The degradation of wood surfaces exposed to UV light which leads to poor performance of clear coatings is understood to be due to delignification via a mechanism involving free radicals. Certain wood preservatives most notably CCA are able to photostabilise wood and therefore they may reduce the concentration of free radicals formed when treated wood is exposed to ultraviolet light. As a first step to prove this hypothesis we have treated a number of thin Scots pine veneers with two different commonly used wood preservatives (CCA, ACQ) and two effective photostabilising treatments (HEBP, DHBP). Treated veneers were then placed in an ESR spectrometer which allowed the samples to be exposed to UV radiation while the spectra were recorded. The spectra were compared with that obtained using untreated wood. The results are very encouraging showing a smaller concentration of free radicals in preservative treated veneers than in untreated controls and there is also marked differences between the various treatments. More work is needed to establish a direct relationship between free radical concentration as measured by ESR spectroscopy and prolonged longevity of a wood surface exposed outdoors. Ultimately ESR spectroscopy has the potential to substitute time consuming and costly weathering trials, at least for screening of large numbers of unknown compounds for their ability to prevent the photodegradation of wood.
S Schmid, R D Webster, P D Evans


Generation of hydroxyl radical by the brown-rot fungus, Postia placenta
1988 - IRG/WP 1360
In an electron spin resonance (ESR) survey of various liquid cultures and wood slivers innoculated with the brown-rot fungus, Postia placenta, the spin trap dimethyl-l-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) was used to detect the presence of the hydroxyl radical. The ESR spectra for the paramagnetic DMPO- hydroxyl radical adduct was observed in (1) nitrogen-limited, liquid cultures having 1.0% glucose or 0.1% cellobiose as the carbohydrate source and (2) fungal infected wood slivers of Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and white fir (Abies concolor). The 4-line ESR signal had a 1:2:2:1 intensity ratio, 15 G line splitting, and a g-factor of 2.003. The signal was stronger and more stable in wood slivers than in liquid cultures. The effect of free radical scavengers on the DMPO-hydroxyl adduct signal is currently being studied.
B Illman, D C Meinholtz, T L Highley


Solvent extraction of CCA-C from out-of-service wood
1998 - IRG/WP 98-50107
Elimination of CCA from decommissioned wood prior to disposal is a major environmental issue. One approach is to extract CCA from treated wood, then reuse the 'clean' (may contain CCA, but below hazardous level) wood materials for manufacturing wood-based composites. In the present paper, we focus on effective leaching processes, selection of leaching agents and optimum leaching process parameters (temperature, time and reagent concentrations). These factors are crucial in obtaining high strength 'environmentally clean used wood substrate' suitable in manufacturing boards. Some leaching agents selectively leach certain components of CCA. Different combinations and sequences of leaching were evaluated. All treatments leave significant amounts of some CCA components in the wood, although some combinations of solvents can extract about 90% of all CCA components in 4 hours at a temperature of 50°C. Sequential extraction using formic acid and oxalic acid was one especially effective combination. Solution temperature, concentration and leaching time affect CCA component removal in different ways, depending on the solvent and element extracted. It should be possible to optimize extraction by manipulating these variables.
K M F Kazi, P A Cooper


A preliminary comparison of GC, HPLC and ELISA analysis of resin acids in pulp mill effluents
1997 - IRG/WP 97-20120
Resin acids are naturally occurring diterpenoid carboxylic acids present in most Canadian softwoods. There are eight common resin acids that are classified into two groups; the abietanes and the pimaranes. During processing of wood products they can be released into the environment where they are of concern because of their acute toxicity toward fish and other aquatic life. Traditionally resin acids are analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) which requires extraction of analytes from a sample matrix, derivatization to increase analyte volatility and separation by solid phase extraction. This process is difficult, tedious and expensive but provides quantification of the individual resin acids with low detection limits. Recently a fast and simple high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed to analyze dehydroabietic acid (DHA) directly from pulp mill effluents. Our laboratory has developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on polyclonal antibodies that was successfully used to directly quantify the abietanes in CTMP effluent.. We compared the three techniques by analysing effluent samples from the Quesnel River Pulp Mill at various stages of the pulping process. Preliminary results showed good agreement for DHA analysis between the HPLC and GC methods. Since it analyzed for all the abietanes, ELISA measured a greater proportion of the resin acids in the samples than the HPLC. The merits and disadvantages of each method will be further discussed.
A N Serreqi, K Stark, Xiumei Feng, J N Saddler, C Breuil


Influence of carboxylic acids on LEACHING of copper amine based preservatives
2005 - IRG/WP 05-30365
The importance of chromium free preservatives is increasing. Leaching of copper from wood preserved with such solutions is still higher compared to leaching from wood impregnated with copper chromium ones. In order to decrease leaching, different carboxylic acids (octanoic, 2-etilheksanoic, decanoic) were added to copper/amine/boron aqueous solutions. Experiment of leaching of copper from Norway spruce (Picea abies) was performed according to the modified standard procedure (EN 1250). Results presented in this paper showed, that carboxylic acids significantly improve copper fixation. The best one was determined at specimens impregnated with the preservative solutions consisting of copper, ethanolamine, boric acid and octanoic acid.
M Humar, P Kalan, F Pohleven


Leachabilty and efficacy of fatty acid derived boron esters as wood preservatives - leachability and efficacy of fatty acid derived boron esters as wood preservatives
2004 - IRG/WP 04-30351
Borates have many advantages as wood preservatives. However, boron is susceptible to depletion under humid conditions and this restricts its outdoor use. In order to reduce boron leachability in treated wood, one of the anticipative approaches is to use organic fixed boron-based preservatives. This study investigated the leachability of six boron ester compounds as potential preservatives. Scots pine sapwood (Pinus sylvestris L.) test specimens were vacuum treated at different concentrations of BAE (Boric Acid Equivalent) of each boron ester active ingredient with and without 10% addition of commercial resin product. Stand-alone boron treatment using 1% BAE disodium octaborate tetrahydrate (DOT) is conducted as a reference. The results of chemical analysis of leachates taken at different periods showed significant differences in boron leachability between the DOT treated samples and specimens treated with both boron esters. Although there are significant differences between the pure boron treatment and the resin protective addition treatment, minor differences were found between boron ester treatments irrespective of resin addition. However, these data allowed the selection of one boron ester compound for further biotesting based on its leaching performance. Results of the biological assays with both Scots pine sapwood and poplar (Populus trichocarpa x deltoides) samples using the European standard EN 113 confirmed the efficacy of the selected boron ester compound against Coriolus versicolor, Coniophora puteana, Gloeophyllum trabeum and Poria placenta. After sixteen weeks of exposure to fungal attack all specimens treated with the new organic boron compound at 0.66 % BAE, irrespective of resin addition, exhibited insignificant mass loss for all four fungi and both wood species tested, which proved the decay resistance of the treated wood.
A Mohareb, J Van Acker, M Stevens


Recent development in North American industrial wood preservation plants
1988 - IRG/WP 3467
After remaining static for many years there have been a number of changes in plant design and treating cycles in recent years. This has been particularly true in the USA where few restrictions are placed on plant treating cycles by specifications; since only results type specifications are used. It is also important to realize that the AWPA Specifications for Southern Yellow Pine only call for treatment of the sapwood since the heartwood has a high natural resistance to termites and decay. This is evidenced by old plantation houses on Southern and West Indian sugar Plantation houses that have stood for several hundred years. This paper attempts to set out these changes and the reasons for them. Industry often appears to have jumped ahead of research or the results of research have not filtered down to the industry and these knowledge gaps are mentioned in the appropriate sections. These sections try to separate the many inter-related factors into simple headings covering plant components and other factors influencing treatment. Some of the criteria presented in this paper have only been recently recognized as of importance so that results from past research is often found to be inconclusive when studied under the light of present day knowledge (e.g. rate of pressure rise was not noted).
J F Bridges


Experiments on the degradation of tributyltin oxide: A progress report
1984 - IRG/WP 3287
A variety of experiments designed to assess the chemical and physical factors affecting the degradation of tributyltin oxide in treated timber are described. Simple procedures in which temperature and oxygen availability were increased in the presence of wood and water suggest that the wood itself was of prime importance. Attempts to decrease degradation with antioxidants were unsuccessful but led to the idea that free radicals may be instrumental in the degradative mechanism. Subsequent work in which a range of antioxidants and free radical producing systems were used confirmed the susceptibility of tributyltin oxide to the action of free radicals. It is suggested that the presence of free radicals in the painted and treated wood system may be an important factor in the eventual degradation of tributyltin oxide.
R J Orsler, G E Holland


Environmentally benign wood preservatives based on organic biocide antioxidant combinations: A brief review of laboratory and field exposure results and discussion of a proposed mechanism
2004 - IRG/WP 04-30335
The combination of various organic biocides with commercial antioxidants generally increased the biocides’ efficacy 2-3 fold against wood-destroying fungi in short-term laboratory decay tests, and some positive results have been obtained after 2-4 years of outdoor exposure. The two antioxidants principally examined, propyl gallate and butylated hydroxytoluene, are low cost and, since both are food additives, benign. The biocides studied have either been examined as potential wood preservatives or are used in commercial wood preservative systems. The purpose of this paper is to: 1) briefly summarize our prior laboratory decay results; 2) briefly discuss results obtained so far from outdoor exposure tests, both above-ground and ground-contact exposure; 3) discuss differences in results between laboratory decay tests and the outdoor exposure data; and 4) propose a mechanism by which antioxidants could protect wood.
T Schultz, D D Nicholas, W Henry, C Pittman, D Wipf, B Goodell


Fungal detoxification of organotin biocides
1985 - IRG/WP 1258
The ability of a range of wood decaying fungi to inactivate bis(tri-n-butyltin) oxide (TnBTO) in the extracellular growth medium, in stationary liquid culture was determined. A distinction between the ability to tolerate the fungicide and to inactivate it was made: the white-rot organism Coriolus versicolor being the most efficient inactivator. In an attempt to determine the extracellular agents responsible for any detoxification, Coriolus versicolor was shown to produce significantly greater levels of extracellular free radicals/peroxidase. Preliminary tests have shown the nature of the associated anion on the fungicide effects the susceptibility of tributyltin compounds to free radical attack in a chemical system. The ability of an free radical scavenger to reduce detoxification in such a system has also been demonstrated.
P S Belford, D J Dickinson


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