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Granitgard used as a partial and perimeter barrier in the protection of buildings against subterranean termites
1995 - IRG/WP 95-10114
The graded granite subterranean termite physical barrier, commercially marketed as Granitgard, has a Certificate of National Accreditation issued by the Australian Building Codes Board, and is included in Australian Standards. After several years in developing the specifications and installation techniques for Granitgard, it may be used to protect almost all footing designs. Granitgard can be simp...
D M Ewart, J R J French


Iron promotes decay capacity of Serpula lacrymans
1993 - IRG/WP 93-10008
The influence of iron and iron compounds on the decay capacity of Serpula lacrymans was studied. Mass losses of pine wood caused by dry rot fungus were increased when FeSO4 was added into the culture medium or when there were iron nails or stone wool on the culture medium. This supports the hypothesis that iron in stone-based building materials is one reason for the increased decay capacity of Ser...
L Paajanen


The permanence of permethrin in wood preservation
1984 - IRG/WP 3288
The permanence of the synthetic pyrethroid permethrin in treated wood has been assessed for double vacuum and immersion treated Scots pine sapwood and whitewood using a 0.5% m/m solution of the insecticide in a hydrocarbon solvent. It is concluded that for all but the outermost 0.5 mm of the treated battens the distribution of the permethrin is relatively permanent. The outermost 0.5 mm appears vu...
R J Orsler, M W S Stone


Effect of mineral wools on growth and decay capacities of Serpula lacrymans and some other brown-rot fungi
1991 - IRG/WP 1481
The influence of stone wool and glass wool on growth and decay capacities of Serpula lacrymans and some other brown-rot fungi was studied. Mass losses of pine wood caused by Serpula lacrymans and Gloeophyllum trabeum were increased when stone wool was present. Glass wool had no influence on mass losses. Coniophora puteana, Serpula lacrymans and Gloeophyllum trabeum grew into stone wool and destroy...
L Paajanen, A-C Ritschkoff


Iron in stone wool - one reason for the increased growth and decay capacity of Serpula lacrymans
1992 - IRG/WP 92-1537
The chemical compositions of stone wool and glass wool were analysed. There was more iron in the stone wool than in the glass wool. It was found that iron present in stone wool was easily dissolved by oxalic acid that Serpula lacrymans is able to produce. The stone wool promoted the decay of pine wood by Serpula lacrymans. The glass wool had no effect on the decay capacity of Serpula Iacrymans. Th...
L Paajanen, A-C Ritschkoff


Observations on preservative penetration in poplar
1991 - IRG/WP 3662
In the course of studies on the CCA treatment and durability of poplar timber a zone of refractory wood at the sapwood/heartwood boundary was observed. Further studies were conducted to investigate the causes of this refractory behaviour. The initial results have suggested that the presence of lipid storage products in the ray tissue may lead to impermeability, either by directly blocking pits or ...
R J Murphy, S U Din, M J Stone


Experiments in accelerated ageing
1984 - IRG/WP 2223
Experiments using a vacuum oven to accelerate the evaporative loss of g-HCH from treated wood blocks have indicated that the method described in this paper has the potential to reproduce in a relatively short time the distributions and loadings of the insecticide that are found during natural ageing. By contrast, the wind tunnel removed the volatile material in a way not found in natural ageing an...
R J Orsler, M W S Stone


Review of candidate graded particle barrier testing methods in Australian Standard (AS 3660.3 – 2000): Assessment criteria for termite management systems
2009 - IRG/WP 09-20417
The Australian Standard (AS. 3660.3 – 2000) for assessment of candidate graded particle termite barriers is reviewed and suggestions for amendments are made. Areas requiring amending in light of current biological knowledge involve the inclusion of proprietary or patented systems rather than generic types; selection of test termites in the genus Coptotermes; duration of test periods; and inadequ...
J R J French, B M Ahmed (Shiday), B L Schafer


Preliminary laboratory and field evaluation on the performance of Rubbermite as a graded physical barrier against subterranean termite species in Australia
2012 - IRG/WP 12-10766
This paper describes the performance of Rubbermite as a potential graded particle barrier against two subterranean termite species of Coptotermes in laboratory and field test. The results of these bioassays suggest that Rubbermite is a viable control option against Coptotermes species in Australia, particularly against Coptotermes acinaciformis (Froggatt) and Coptotermes lacteus (Froggatt). Rubber...
B M Ahmed (Shiday), J R J French


Material Resistance and Chemical Composition of Italian Stone Pine (Pinus pinea)
2018 - RG/WP 18-20645
Relevant properties of stone pine (Pinus pinea) wood have been only fragmentarily addressed in the past, which has been recognized as a limiting factor for its potential applications. The amount of the respective wood species on the market will likely increase in the future. The sorption properties, permeability to water, extractives content and durability against fungi of Pinus pinea sapwood and ...
M Humar, M De Angelis, M Romagnoli, V Vek, I Poljanšek, P Oven, N Thaler, B Lesar, D Kržišnik


Potential Use of the Pigment from Scytalidium cuboideum and Chlorociboria aeruginosa as an UV-light Protection Additive in Oil Finishes
2019 - IRG/WP 19-40868
UV-light degradation of wood is one of the top reasons for consumer replacement of outdoor wooden structures. This type of degradation is seldom mechanical, and is instead often motivated by loss of aesthetics (graying). There are numerous commercial products available on the market that deal with this loss of color, many of which contain added pigments to ‘rejuvenate’ or ‘revitalize’ grey...
S M Vega Gutierrez, D W Stone, R He3, P T Vega Gutierrez, Z M Walsh, S C Robinson