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Performance of chromated copper arsenate-treated aspen fence posts installed in Forintek's Eastern test plot from 1951 to 1963
1984 - IRG/WP 3272
Aspen poplar fence posts were pressure treated by the full cell process using three formulations of copper chrome arsenate wood preservative. A total of one hundred and fifty nine of the posts were installed in service in Forintek's Chalk River post plot from 1951 to 1962. During the 1982 general inspection of the post plot all 159 posts were still in service. A groundline inspection was carried out on the material to determine the extent to which decay had progressed during this period. Samples were taken from the surface of tanalith C treated posts and subsequent microscopic examination revealed that soft rot attack was present in the outer portion of posts. The groundline area of posts treated with (K 33), CCA type B and (greensalt) CCA type A were in generally good condition after 22 years and 31 years respectively. Rate of decay was highest for CCA-C tanalith treated posts at 0.3 mm per year with a retention of 3.04 kg/m³ oxides.
C D Ralph


Comparisons of differences in electrical conductivity and corrosivity between CCA-oxide and CCA-salt treated wood
1981 - IRG/WP 3178
CCA preservatives have served well in many applications throughout the world. In developed areas it is the preservative in demand for clean dry paintable surfaces with long durability. In developing areas it is widely used for economic and logistical reasons. With the current emphasis on energy resources, the CCA preservatives are gaining greater acceptance as a substitute for hydrocarbon-related preservatives. While there are several formulations with apparent wide differences in the proportions of active ingredients, (chrome, copper and arsenate), the performance of each appear to be essentially equivalent as wood preservatives. This performance has lead to an almost blind acceptance in the market place in the U.S. in that any CCA is considered equivalent in all respects. When all aspects are considered, it is readily apparent that this equivalency does not exist.
J A Taylor


Inadequacies in preservative retention and formulation as contributory causes of premature failure of CCA-treated vineyard posts
1984 - IRG/WP 3280
Analyses of severely decayed or failed vineyard posts and examination of stake test data on effectiveness of copper-chrome-arsenate (CCA) preservatives have suggested two contributory causes of premature failure of vineyard posts: 1. Preservative retentions in posts are such that after 15 years' exposure some decay is inevitable. 2. The high arsenic, low chrome formulations with which the posts were treated are less effective in controlling decay than low arsenic high chrome formulations previously used in New Zealand, on the performance of which many concepts of CCA effectiveness are based.
M E Hedley