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Progress towards controlling soft rot of treated hardwood poles in Australia
1977 - IRG/WP 289
H Greaves


Effectiveness of "Gang-Nail" plates in preventing splitting of Eucalyptus poles and Brazilian hardwood sleepers
1984 - IRG/WP 3262
This paper presents the results of some tests carried out with an anti-splitting device, placed on the end surfaces of Eucalyptus spp utility poles and Brazilian hardwood sleepers at the beginning of an air-drying period. The type of device used, a "Gang-Nail" plate, reduces significantly the splits at the end-surface of poles, but reduces only a little the splits occurring in sleepers.
A M F Oliveira, J A C Sodré, O B Neto


Positive dosage response of CCA in hardwood power poles to soft rot indicated from New South Wales soft rot survey dat
1983 - IRG/WP 3233
Experience and observation have shown that retentions of less than 16 kg/m³ in the sapwood of individual hardwood poles are unlikely to delay its deterioration sufficiently to ensure an economic performance in some instances. The higher retentions of current practice should do so subject to adequate inspection and maintenance. Increases in retentions requirements up to 35 kg/m³ more or less, depending on species should now be implemented in the interest of securing a greater margin of confidence in the product at small additional cost.
A J Witheridge


An environmental aspect relating to leachability of CCA from hardwood and softwood poles in Bangladesh
2001 - IRG/WP 01-50167
Leachability of CCA and the service performance of 8 softwood and 5 heartwood poles in service after 5 to 17 years in Bangladesh have been studied. The study included determination of retention of CCA-C in outer 6 mm zones at groundline (GL) and above groundline (AGL) along with the observation of decay and conditions of soils. The mean leaching of CCA-C derived from retention differential at GL and AGL are not found to be statistically significant. The existing balances of CCA-C components in poles do not indicate any leaching loss occurred. Reductions in retention have been noted at GL of softwood poles and at AGL of hardwood poles. Among several possibilities the density of wood as well as wood species/types, levels of retention, conditions of soil are found to be the prime factors which may increase leaching/depletion of CCA from the GL of softwood poles and responsible for poor performance of hardwood poles. The levels of CCA retentions in hardwood poles are not found to be adequate and equivalent to the levels of softwood poles in use. The CCA retentions of softwood poles were found still well above the toxic threshold for decay in even the oldest poles. Remedial treatments at GL of CCA-C treated hardwood poles installed in Bangladesh have been found to be essential. Very good service conditions confirm no remedial treatment necessary for CCA treated softwood poles.
A K Lahiry


Soft rot fungi found in copper/chrome/arsenic treated hardwood power transmission poles in Queensland
1978 - IRG/WP 185
In Queensland the effective service life of copper/chrome/arsenic (CCA) treated hardwood telegraph and power transmission poles is being dramatically shortened due to attack by soft rot decay fungi. The Australian Wood Preservation and Pole Industries are funding research into this serious soft rot problem involving C.S.I.R.O. and the University of Queensland. The C.S.I.R.O. is actively engaged with the in situ maintenance of existing hardwood poles, preservative distribution in hardwoods and the development of new impregnation preservatives and impregnation methods. This work has been discussed (Greaves, 1977) and more recent results will be presented at this meeting. The role of the University of Queensland in the soft rot programme is one of identifying and investigating the physiology and ecology of those fungi responsible for soft rot. Detailed examination of twenty transmission poles, with and without remedial. treatments, in localities around Brisbane city have been made. Preliminary results for ten of these poles are presented in this document together with future research proposals.
L E Leightley


Pole yield of some softwood and hardwood species grown in Bangladesh
1999 - IRG/WP 99-40143
Growth study on 9 timber species planted in Bangladesh soils revealed that 6 species fall under wooden electric pole yield group-A, produce 33% poles within 10 years, another 33% within 15 years and additional 33% within 20 years of rotation. Two species under yield group-B produce 33% poles within 15 years and another 33% within 20 years. One species under yield group-C produce at best 25% poles within 15 years and 50% poles within 20 years of plantation, considered to be unsuitable for pole production compared to the species under group A and B. Large scale plantation with timber species under yield group-A is recommended for pole production.
A K Lahiry


The influence of drilling patterns on the distribution of toxicants from Polesaver Rods in hardwood poles
1994 - IRG/WP 94-30051
Polesaver Rods are solid rods of wood preservative that are used as a groundline maintenance treatment to control biodeterioration in hardwood transmission poles in Australia. The rods are inserted in holes that are drilled in a prescribed manner to distribute the toxicants into the critical groundline region of the poles. To determine the influence of drilling patterns on the distribution of toxicants five test drilling patterns, including the prescribed method, were assessed in unseasoned pole-size stubs of tallowwood (Eucalyptus microcorys F. Muell). The distribution of toxicants was visually appraised and is reported for three of the drilling patterns. The results indicate that drilling patterns influenced the toxicant distribution. Two of the trial patterns appeared to provide improved distribution of toxicants for specific applications when compared with the prescribed pattern.
W D Gardner, C N McEvoy


Effects of chemicals used for ground-line protection of hardwood poles on termite attack
1988 - IRG/WP 1356
The majority of chemicals formulatet to protect the groundline of hardwood poles in Australia have been fungicides. Nine products were tested against Coptotermes lacteus attack to determine their value in preventing attack by subterranean termites. Results indicated that Busan, high temperature creosote, pigment emulsified creosote, copper naphthenate gel and "Blue 7" had a repellent effect on Coptotermes lacteus, while "Blue 7" had toxic consequences.
R S Johnstone, R H Eldridge


Treatment groups and remedies for CCA treated hardwood and softwood poles
1999 - IRG/WP 99-40142
Different hardwood and softwood species from Bangladesh and Bhutan was investigated regarding density, green fiber stress, natural durability of heartwood and CCA treated sapwood, CCA treatability grades, sapwood thickness, and kiln-drying properties for long term use as electric poles. These properties along with the past service records for nineteen years, separated ten heardwood and five softwood species into four treatment groups. The treatment groups are very specific for specific timber species and adequate for equivalent requisite service life for tropical and subtropical climatic conditions without premature failure like in the past.
A K Lahiry


A Case Study of Long-term CCA Preservative Leaching from Treated Hardwood Poles in a Humid Tropical Condition
2016 - IRG/WP 16-50324
Chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated Malaysian hardwoods have long been used as utility poles, posts, construction piles and motorway fencing in soil contact exposed to the threats of decay fungi and termites. Despite global concerns citing predominantly temperate conditions of long-term leaching of CCA toxic heavy metals from wood into surrounding soils and groundwater since the 1990’s, the preservative leaching severity in the tropics has been far less appreciated due to dearth of work in this area. In 2013 (after 30 years exposure), levels of total copper, chromium and arsenic within 20 treated hardwood poles of Sarawak and in soils surrounding these poles, installed in 1980 and 1981 at a plot located in Timber Research and Technical Training Centre, Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia, were sampled. The ground is waterlogged after heavy rainfall. It is shown that there is insignificant variations of CCA salt retention in wood between 1300 cm above ground and 0-20 cm below ground (P<0.05). Nevertheless levels of these elements are significantly (P<0.05) elevated in soils surrounding, especially up to 25 mm away from, the poles than at distant sampling points (150 – 300 mm) from poles as well as at sites well away from the poles containing very low levels (<6 – 13.4 ppm) of such heavy metals. Metal levels were also highest at the soil surface directly in contact with the poles (0 – 50 mm soil depth position) and decreased with remaining 2 soil depth positions 150 – 200 mm and 300 – 350 mm. Mean extractable arsenic levels ranged from 14.5 to 100.1 ppm, chromium levels from 23.3 to 148.3 ppm and copper from 21.8 to 104.7 ppm. Results, rather than indicating relatively higher CCA leaching, concurred with that reported temperate experience and showed that soil closest to the treated poles are most contaminated, albeit slightly, after 30 years of in-ground exposure.
A H H Wong, W S M Chin


Field trial with poles of Scots pine treated with six different creosotes
1996 - IRG/WP 96-30115
In the middle of the 50&apos;s field trials with creosote-treated poles were started in France, Germany and Sweden. The trials were initiated by WEI (Western-European Institute for Wood Preservation). Six different creosotes were used and 40 poles per creosote were installed at each test field. Results after 39 years of exposure in Simlangsdalen, Sweden are reported. Poles treated with a heavy creosote were less decayed than poles treated with medium-heavy creosotes. Poles treated with a light creosote were most decayed.
Ö Bergman


Field performance of wood preservative systems in secondary timber species
1997 - IRG/WP 97-30152
The objective of this ongoing study is to evaluate the performance of new, potential, and standard wood preservative systems in secondary North American timber species. Eleven preservative systems were evaluated in this study - ACQ Type B, Copper Citrate 2: l, CDDC, chlorothalonil/chlorpyrifos, copper-8-quinolinolate, tebuconazole/chlorpyrifos, RH287, propiconazole/chlorpyrifos, copper naphthenate, CCA. and creosote. Field evaluations are being performed with ground contact field stakes and termite-specific testing in Hawaii, along with laboratory soil bed tests. The major wood species used with all the systems and evaluation methodologies are loblolly pine, northern red oak, tulip poplar, and cottonwood. More limited evaluations (field stakes only) are being conducted with eastern hemlock, red maple, and sweetgum. Information is presented from laboratory soil bed, field termite, and field stake evaluations. There is good correspondence between soil bed and field stake results. The more highly developed preservative systems and those in an AWPA P9 Type A oil carrier tend to perform better, and there can be a strong affect on performance from the wood species.
P E Laks, K W Gutting, R C De Groot


Soft rot in CCA-treated utility poles in Sweden
1989 - IRG/WP 1398
Soft rot investigations of CCA-treated utility poles (Pinus sylvestris L.) have been conducted throughout large parts of Sweden during 1974-1985. The investigation included 179 utility poles of the State Power Board which had been used for 10-18 years in the different administrative regions from northern to southern Sweden. In addition, 193 telephone poles from the Östersund area and 218 from the Kristianstad area were studied after having been in use for 18-25 years. The soft rot fungi cause two types of attack in wood cells, namely cavities (Type I) and erosion (Type II). In this investigation, soft rot is reported only when cavities of Type I were found. Erosion (Type II) is more difficult to observe, particularly in early stages, and in addition is almost impossible to distinguish from certain other attacks of rot, such as white rot, which may have occurred during storage of the poles before impregnation. In western and central Sweden, minor attacks of soft rot were found after 10-12 years in State Power Board poles embedded in soil in arable land and meadows. Power Board poles in northern Sweden had minor attacks of soft rot after 16-18 years in arable land and also in forest land when embedded in soil. Poles used by the Telecommunications services, all embedded in stone, showed minor and only occasional attacks of soft rot at Östersund (northen Sweden), but considerably more soft rot at Kristianstad (southern Sweden). The Telecommunication poles had been in service up to seven years longer than the poles used by the State Power Board. The localization and spread of soft rot attacks in a pole can vary. There may be many reasons for this, including insufficient impregnation, leaching, etc. The soft rot attacks found in the Power Board poles are always minor and sporadic and none of the investigated poles can be said to imply any safety risk. The same applies to the Telecommunication poles at Östersund whereas those at Kristianstad demonstrated considerably more severe and more frequent attacks. The attacks of soft rot in the Telecommunication poles more frequently occurred internally, more often deeper in the sapwood than in the outermost parts.
H Friis-Hansen, H Lundström


Soft rot penetration - Effect of groundline maintenance treatment on poles in sevice
1983 - IRG/WP 3263
R S Johnstone


Essais biologiques sur poteaux traités à la Wolmanit C.B. suivant le procédé Boucherie modifé
1974 - IRG/WP 336
D Lapetite, C Jacquiot, J Campredon


A case study on quality control on telephone poles as a cost saving tool in Tanzania
1987 - IRG/WP 3418
A sample of 28 CCA treated Eucalyptus poles from a lot of 2,000 poles awaiting delivery to the field, was studied to reveal the quality of treatment. Results showed a product of very poor quality. Average figures for penetration and retention were 8.4 mm and 2.2 kg/m³; these results are 66% and 91% below the required standards, respectively. Consequences of such results are estimated to amount to losses of billion of shillings.
K K Murira


Extending the useful life of creosoted electricity distribution poles in service
1993 - IRG/WP 93-50001-16
Creosoted transmission poles have provided good service over many decades in a whole range of environments. The use of save biocides for secondary treatments has the potential to extend the life of such poles. These techniques, together with a full understanding of the modes of failure, make it possible to establish new strategies to further improve the environmental benefits of treated wooden poles.
D J Dickinson, B Calver


Field trials of groundline remedial treatments on soft rot attacked CCA treated Eucalyptus poles
1983 - IRG/WP 3222
A total of 17 CCA treated Eucalyptus poles, which were found to contain 2-5 mm of soft rot in October, 1980, were reinspected in October, 1982. In 1980, 11 of the poles were given a supplemental groundline bandage treatment of either Osmoplastic or Patox, while 6 of the poles were designated as untreated controls. Two years after remedial treatment, samples were removed from the poles for microscopic observations and for chemical retention analysis. It was found that the remedial bandage treatments were effective in preventing any further advance of soft rot. Based on the positive results of this study, a treatment efficacy of five years or longer is predicted.
W S McNamara, R J Ziobro, J F Triana


Cu, Cr and As distribution in soils adjacent to CCA treated utility poles in Eastern Black Sea Region of Turkey
2004 - IRG/WP 04-50214
In this study, the main objective was to asses the distribution of Cu, Cr, and As in soils adjacent to CCA treated utility poles in Eastern Blacksea Region of Turkey (Trabzon, Rize and Artvin ) and determine the influence of soil composition. Surface (0-5cm), subsurface soil samples (30-40cm) were collected near CCA-treated utility poles and control soil samples away from CCA-treated utility poles were also collected. Water holding capacity, pH, mechanical properties of soil samples were determined for both depth levels. Results showed that Cu, Cr and As concentration in soil samples taken from all three cities in 0-5cm depth was higher than soil samples taken from 30-40cm depth. Cu, Cr and As concentrations were much higher in soil samples taken from city of Rize.
E D Gezer, Ü C Yildiz, A Temiz, S Yildiz, E Dizman


Japanese wood preserving industry
1990 - IRG/WP 3596
Although a great amount of wood is in use in Japan, a little attention has been paid to the significance and importance of wood preservation. The fact reflects that only less than 0.5% of the total wood consumption is treated with wood preservatives today in the country. Over the 20 years before 1970, the annual volume of preservative treated (pressure treatment) wood was relatively at a stable level of approximately 500,000 m³. After the prominent peak of 709,000 m³ in 1968, 500,000 to 600,000 m³ of wood had been annually treated until 1980. In the 1980&apos;s the pace of production of preservative-treated wood gradually declined, down to 400,000 m³ in 1988. As for commodities treated with wood preservatives, poles and sleepers have been remarkably decreasing, and wood foundation sills which newly appeared on the market in the late 1960&apos;s became a major item. It is expected that new treated commodities will be accepted among Japanese people to stimulate the activity of wood preserving industry in Japan.
K Tsunoda


Decay resistance of wood removed from poles treated with Trichoderma
1989 - IRG/WP 1386
Wood blocks removed from a distribution pole previously treated with a biological control product (Binab FYT pellets) were exposed in soil block tests to selected basidiomycetes. The blocks were removed from regions of poles where Trichoderma colonization had been confirmed by extensive sampling and computer mapping of microbial inhabitants. The results indicate that material from pole interiors colonized by Trichoderma is able to resist decay by Lentinus lepideus and Antrodia carbonica. Any decay prevention was lost however when the wood was steam sterilized prior to exposure to the basidiomycetes. The implications of the results for the use of biological control of internal decay in creosoted poles is briefly discussed.
A Bruce, B King, T L Highley


Introduction to a field demonstration of various instruments and methods for the detection of defects in poles
1984 - IRG/WP 2228
H Friis-Hansen


Essais mycologiques sur poteaux traités à la Wolmanit C B
1974 - IRG/WP 339
D Ollier, C Jacquiot


The leaching of copper, chrome and arsenate from CCA-impregnated poles stored for ten years in running water
1978 - IRG/WP 3122
There is no evidence to indicate that the chromium and copper components are leached from the outermost 5 mm of sapwood in poles impregnated with Boliden K33 and Tanalith C and stored in running water for ten years. The arsenic component, however, seems to be leached out during the first few months to an extent of about 20% of the initial amount. The leaching time is dependent on the preservative used.
F G Evans


Resistance to soft rot of hardwood plywood treated with CCA salt
1983 - IRG/WP 3258
Plywood made from indigenous hardwoods was treated at an average loading of 34 kg Celcure A per m³ and was installed in a field test. After 20 years the samples were only slightly attacked by soft rot and the glue bonds were still intact.
R S Johnstone


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