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Preliminary study of the fungicidal and structural variability in copper naphthenates and naphthenic acids
1996 - IRG/WP 96-30114
Copper naphthenates, an oil-borne wood preservative listed by the American Wood-Preservers' Association (AWPA), is manufactured by complexing copper(II) with naphthenic acids. Prior to AWPA listing as a wood preservative, field experiments showed that copper naphthenates generally had good stability and were active against wood-destroying organisms. Recently, however, there have been reports of some copper naphthenate-treated poles rapidly failing. One possible explanation for the varying effectiveness could be that the structure, and resulting biological activity, of the naphthenic acids used to make copper naphthenate may vary. To test this hypothesis several naphthenic acids and copper naphenates were obtained and their fungicidal activity against three wood-destroying fungi measured. In addition, the chemical structure of the naphthenic acids were examined by proton- and carbon- NMR. Different activities were observed, especially against a copper-tolerant fungus. Some apparent correlations were seen between the fungicidal activity and chemical structures for the few samples studied.
T Schultz, D D Nicholas, L L Ingram Jr, T H Fisher


International collaborative laboratory comparison of two wood preservatives against subterranean termites: Third update and first report
1996 - IRG/WP 96-10174
At the 24th annual meeting of IRG in Orlando, USA, in May 1993 an international subterranean termite laboratory bioassay to compare the various preferred termite protocols used by IRG termitologists was initiated. The author was nominated to co-ordinate this comparative laboratory evaluation of two wood preservatives, copper-chrome-arsenic (CCA) and copper naphthenate (Cu-Na) against the subterranean termites used as test termites in Australia, France, Japan, Thailand, United Kingdom and the Unites States of America. Solutions of these two wood preservatives were prepared and impregnated into Pinus radiata wood blocks to obtain loading of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 kg/m³ respectively. All preservative treatments were carried out at the Division of Forestry and Forest Products in Melbourne. The treated specimens were dispatched to the participating researchers who subjected these specimens to attack by their test termite species, and have now returned the specimens to Melbourne. This paper reports the amount of wood consumed and the mean mass loss (%) on both treated and untreated wood blocks by the termites in the various laboratory bioassays.
J R J French


Field Testing of Copper Carboxylate Preservatives
2003 - IRG/WP 03-30322
This paper details our ongoing experience with field testing of copper naphthenate and other copper carboxylate preservative systems. Results from field stake tests at an AWPA Hazard Zone 4 test site are presented. In general, copper carboxylates made with ‘synthetics’ yielded results equivalent to or only slightly lower than systems with straight nap acids or nap acids amended with synthetic neo acid bottoms.
H M Barnes, M G Sanders, T L Amburgey


Copper naphthenate performance: A new way to look at old data
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30215
Although copper naphthenate has over a 50-year test history, it is still considered as a "new" preservative in the United States when it is used for utility poles. It has also been extensively used in remedial treatments for poles and has considerable retail or over-the-counter sales. The test history includes a number of different tests and a rationale for evaluating this data and comparing the performance of copper naphthenate to other common pole preservatives is presented. Thus, the efficacy of copper naphthenate can be easily summarized.
C R McIntyre


Light organic solvent preservative treatment of glue-laminated radiata pine
1986 - IRG/WP 3380
The high permeability of radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) is associated with ray-tissue and in particular the cross-field pits linking ray-tissue to tracheids. This pathway is absent in the tangential grain direction, leading to poor preservative penetration when treatment is restricted to the radial face - for example, timber fabricated into glue-laminated beams.
P Vinden


Comparative performance of pentachlorophenol and copper naphthenate in a long term field stake test
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30243
In this study the performance of copper naphthenate (Cu-Nap) and pentachlorophenol (Penta) treated pine stakes against decay and termite attack were compared at two test sites in Mississippi. Four different petroleum oils meeting AWPA Standard P9-A were used as carriers for these wood preservatives. After ten years exposure, the efficacy of Cu-Nap at a retention level of 0.05 pcf Cu was equivalent or slightly better than Penta at a retention level of 0.40 pcf. The type of carrier oil had an effect on the performance, but this was variable for both the type of preservative and test site. In comparing the two test sites, the performance of both preservatives was consistently better at the Dorman Lake test site. Wood treated with the oil carriers alone initially performed reasonably well against both wood decay fungi and termites, but the activity decreased rapidly after about six years exposure. Like the preservatives, the performance of the oils was consistently better at the Dorman Lake test site.
D D Nicholas, M H Freeman


Wood preservation in the Australian beekeeping industry
1988 - IRG/WP 3473
This paper reports the results of a survey of Australian commercial beekeepers working 200 or more hives in June/July 1985. Nine hundred and forty seven apiarists were asked to participate and to provide information on their wood preservation methods, painting procedures and maintenance of bee boxes. Three hundred and eighty-four apiarists returned completed questionnaires (41%). The main wood preservatives used are copper naphthenate solutions (45%), linseed oil (8%), copper chromated arsenate (3%), hot wax (9%), copper naphthenate solution in linseed oil (3%), linseed oil/wax mixtures (3%) and paint (23%). The majority of apiarists (96%) paint treated bee hives, but there is considerable variation in wood preservative treatment procedures and paint application. Most wood preservative treatments (95%) are of the 'do-it-yourself' variety, radiata pine being the most utilized timber. The bottom boards of bee hives are considered the most susceptible to wood decay and subterranean termite damage, as are cleats, stands or any wood in ground contact.
P J Robinson, J R J French


A laboratory soil-block decay evaluation of plywoods edge-treated with preservatives
1982 - IRG/WP 2174
Preservative-treated plywood used under conditions or severe decay hazard frequently has its original, or cut edges, protected by the application of a field-cut preservative. This study uses a laboratory test method to compare the efficacy of four commercial preservative treatments against two commonly occurring brown-rot fungi. The results are not meant to indicate the service life of such treated plywood.
R S Smith, A Byrne


Copper naphthenate-treated Southern Pine pole stubs in field exposure. -Part 2: Chemical characterization of full size pole stubs 12 years after treatment
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30246
This study examines the influence of pre-treatment and post-treatment steaming on the character and physio-chemical nature of copper naphthenate in hydrocarbon solvent treated pine in larger, pole diameter, pole stub-length samples. This work is the continuation of two projects that began almost a decade ago. Previous reports indicated that certain morphological changes might occur in small laboratory steamed samples of copper naphthenate treated southern pine. Toluene-methanol extraction, UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) were used to investigate the nature and properties of the copper naphthenate present in the wood after 12 years of exposure. The formation of solid cuprous oxide occurred regardless of pre- or post-steaming conditioning.
H M Barnes, D P Kamdem, M H Freeman


Metal carboxylates for wood pest control
1996 - IRG/WP 96-30109
Metal carboxylates have been used as wood preservatives for more than fifty years. Predominantly salts of naphtenic acids have been commercially applied so far. They have water repellent as well as fungicidal and insecticidal properties. In the last years, metal carboxylates of saturated fatty acids were introduced. Fatty acids with 7-10 carbon atoms already have fungicidal activity by themselves. However, their efficacy is markedly increased in a complex with metal ion such as copper and zinc. This carboxylates are environment friendly and low toxic for humans. We studied fungicidal, insecticidal and termiticidal effectiveness of copper and zinc carboxylates by European standard methods. The strongest fungicidal and insecticidal activity showed copper and zinc naphtenates and copper octanoate. The metal octanoates are soluble in white spirit and, moreover in aqueous ammonia solutions. One day after treatment, the leaching of some carboxylates from wood was very low. These carboxylates did not increase the flammability of treated wood.
F Pohleven, M Petric


The effect of steam conditioning on Southern yellow pine treated with copper naphthenate
1997 - IRG/WP 97-40086
The current study was undertaken to investigate the influence of steam conditioning on Southern yellow pine treated with copper naphthenate (Cu-N). Pre-steamed and /or kiln-dried Southern yellow pine were pressure treated with Cu-N. After treatment, one group of samples were post-steamed. It was found that samples changed color from green to dark-brown after post-steaming. To elucidate the effect of steaming on treated wood, several techniques, namely, environmental scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive X-rays analysis (ESEM-EDXA), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were employed. After post-steaming, ESEM showed clearly crystal deposit on the Cu-N treated samples, and EDXA data suggested that the crystal was copper and oxygen contained compound identified as Cuprous Oxide (Cu2O) by XRD. The amount of Cu2O in wood samples was semi-quantitatively determined with XRD. XPS C1s spectra showed that post-steaming decreased C1 contribution and increased O/C ratio attributed to the loss of oil rich in hydrocarbons. The removal of water solubles extractives rich in carbon explains the decrease of O/C ratio. The resistance of copper to water leaching was improved by pre-steaming contrary to the post steaming which resulted in high copper loss.
Jun Zhang, D P Kamdem, M H Freeman, R D Arsenault


Marine performance of preservative treated Southern pine panels. Part 2: Exposure at Mourilyan Harbour, Queensland, Australia
2000 - IRG/WP 00-10337
Southern yellow pine panels treated with ACQ type B, ACQ type A, CCA type C, creosote, and copper naphthenate have been exposed at Mourilyan Harbour, north Queensland, Australia for almost 6 years. These panels have been inspected and rated for fouling and attack by Teredinid, Limnoria, Martesia, and Sphaeroma during this exposure. After 70 months exposure, overall performance of ACQ type B was equivalent to CCA type C at similar loadings, while ACQ type A did not perform as well. CCA and ACQ at 40 and 20 kg/m3 are performing similar to creosote at 430 and 200 kg/m3, respectively. The copper naphthenate treated panels did not perform as well as the ACQ panels at similar total copper loadings. Fouling of panels treated with ACQ was less than that found on CCA and creosote treated panels, but similar to that found on copper naphthenate treated panels exhibiting the same level of performance.
A R Zahora, A F Preston, K J Archer, S Kleinschmidt


Preservative performance of copper naphthenate (SANPRESER-OGR) in brush treatment of timber
1991 - IRG/WP 3663
Preservative efficacy of copper naphthenate (SANPRESER-OGR) was evaluated in the laboartory and field trials when timber was treated by brushing. Results of field trial indicated that service life of the brush-treated timber could be approximately 10 years or longer under ground contact conditions, although life span was slightly varied with timber species and test sites. After four years' exposure in the field, the treated stakes remained resistant against termite attacks. These results strongly susgested the potential of copper naphthenate as a wood preservative for brush treatment of timber.
Y Sugai, K Hamada, M Kitada, K Tomoi


Ten year field test with a copper-borate ground line treatment for poles
1993 - IRG/WP 93-30017
A wood preservative paste consisting of borax and copper naphthenate has been tested to determine its efficiency in protecting wood from decay fungi and insects. The paste was applied to polyethylene-backed wraps that were fastened to the below-ground portions of unseasoned southern pine pole stubs. After 4 years of exposure in Mississippi, the untreated control stubs were completely deteriorated. The below-grade portions of the treated stubs remained sound after nearly 6 years of exposure due to movement of copper and diffusion of the borate throughout the cross section. Borate and copper also moved vertically in the stubs and was present in sufficient amounts to protect sections of the stubs as high as 3 feet above grade. After 9 years of exposure, the below-grade portions of the treated stubs had limited areas of decay and no termite damage; the majority of the cross section remained sound. Wood analysis indicated that concentrations of borate in the sound areas were about 1/10 the estimated toxic threshold. A visual examination and push test indicated that the treated stubs continued to be protected at groundline after 10 years of exposure. It is hypothesized that the continued protection of the below-grade portions of the stubs against both decay fungi and subterranean termites is the result of copper-borate complexes that have formed in the wood.
T L Amburgey, M H Freeman


Durability of wood in the area of wood-inhabiting termites in Slovenia
1981 - IRG/WP 1139
This report describes a research dealing with resistance and durability of five different species of wood. The experiment was made in natural conditions in the Slovene area of wood-inhabiting termites. The results of our experimental field, which correspond to the results of the former laboratory experiments, show a very weak resistance of spruce-wood, fir-wood, and beech-wood. They also show their short durability /up to two years/, if they are exposed to all natural external influences. Pine wood shows a better resistance; the most resistant of them is oak-wood. However, the results of the experimental field indicate a possibility of prolonging the durability of these species of wood by a preventive protection made by chemicals.
L Kervina


A Preliminary Report on the Properties of Engineered Wood Composite Panels Treated with Copper Naphthenate
2005 - IRG/WP 05-40294
This paper reports on our preliminary investigation of the properties of randomly oriented strandboard which had waterborne or powdered copper naphthenate (CuN) incorporated into the board during manufacture. When compared to zinc borate-treated controls (ZnB), the mechanical properties of strandboard (MOR, MOE, work-to-maximum load, internal bond strength) were not adversely affected by treatment with either form of copper naphthenate. In general, values for mechanical properties followed the trend untreated controls > waterborne CuN = powdered CuN > ZnB. Water absorption and dimensional properties followed a similar trend. This preliminary study suggests that CuN is a viable alternative treatment for engineered wood composites.
J W Kirkpatrick, H M Barnes


Copper naphthenate: An analysis of the materials found in the worldwide marketplace using a new analytical technique
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30224
Naphthenic acid has been recovered from products of petroleum refining for well over 100 years. The metal soaps, specifically copper and zinc naphthenate, have been evaluated and used as commercial wood preservatives for in excess of 60 years. Most of the early data supporting the continued use of copper naphthenate as a wood preservative was based on materials manufactured from naturally occurring naphthenic acid derived from petroleum. Recent work investigating pesticide label claims for materials asserting to be naphthenic acid salts of copper has in fact shown the presence of many synthetic carboxylic acids as substitutes for naphthenic acid. Additionally, some earlier efficacy studies indicated that non-naphthenate salts of copper actually seemed to promote decay in laboratory tests. This work investigates several sources of copper naphthenate in commercial markets and investigates a novel analytical technique and a modification of this technique to characterize the copper naphthenates found in commercial use worldwide. The basic analytical technique was recently published as an appendix to the American Wood Preservers' Association P-5 (Methods for Chemical Analysis) Sub-Committee annual report to assure compliance with the AWPA P8 Standard.
J A Brient, R E Moyer, M H Freeman, H Jiang


Diffusion of a copper naphthenate/boron paste through Douglas fir heartwood
1991 - IRG/WP 3671
Groundline wraps are an important portion of the remedial treatment strategies for protecting utility poles in North America from surface decay. The compositions of these wraps have recently shifted away from pentachlorophenol and creosote to formulations containing copper naphthenate and boron. These formulations have not yet been extensively tested, although the chemicals have been used for many years in other applications. Radial and longitudinal diffusion of the components of a copper naphthenate/boron paste was studied in Douglas-fir heartwood blocks at 30 and 60% moisture content. Longitudinal orientation and higher moisture levels resulted in greater diffusion of both components. Boron diffused faster than copper naphthenate over the 6 month test period, but the degree of copper movement was substantial. The results suggest that this copper/boron paste can readily diffuse through normally refractory heartwood. Field trials are underway to evaluate the biological efficacy of this formulation.
P G Forsyth, J J Morrell


Serviceability of copper naphthenate-treated poles
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30214
Copper naphthenate-treated poles in service were inspected for deterioration, penetration, retention, and serviceability. The study to date has included poles in all hazard zones in the United States. Poles installed by 12 different utilities and eight different treating companies are included in the survey. Both southern pine and Douglas-fir poles and distribution and transmission poles are included in the survey. Only two of the surveyed poles were considered failures, indicating that properly treated copper naphthenate poles are performing satisfactorily.
H M Barnes, M H Freeman, J A Brient, C N Kerr Jr


Some data on the activity of alternative fungicides for wood preservation
1985 - IRG/WP 3333
Data from laboratory tests against basidiomycete fungi are presented for 9 alternative fungicides in organic solvent formulations and also in water for one product. Results are compared with data for reference preservatives, tributyltin oxide, copper and zinc naphthenates and pentachlorophenol. Of special interest is the apparently better than additive effect of mixing tributyltin naphthenate and Xyligen B, and the promising performance of Armoblen 480, a novel organic solvent formulation of n-alkyl coco-derived quaternary ammonium compounds.
A F Bravery, J K Carey


Laboratory evaluation of metallic naphthenates as wood preservatives
1991 - IRG/WP 3654
Fungicidal and termiticidal efficacy of copper and zinc naphthenates was appraised according to Japanese standardized laboratory testing methods. Copper and zinc naphthenates succeeded in protecting wood from decay fungi at retentions of 0.5 and 1.0 kg/m³ as metal, respectively. [JIS A 9302 (1976)] when they were applied to vacuum/soak impregnation [JIS A 9301 (1976)]. With respect to the fungicidal performance in superficial treatment, copper naphthenate was sufficiently effective at a treating strength of 2% as Cu and zinc naphthenate was at 3% as Zn after mild weathering cycles prescribed in JWPA Standard 1 (1979). Their termiticidal effectiveness was satisfactory at 1-2% in wood block tests [JWPA Standard 111) (1981)] in which Pine sapwood specimens treated by brushing were exposed to subterranean termites for three weeks.
K Tsunoda, M Sakurai


Preservation of robinia wood (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) stakes by vintners
1982 - IRG/WP 3194
This work discusses decay resistance of robinia wood to fungi Trametes versicolor (L.ex Fr.) Pil. and Coniophora puteana (Schum. ex Fr.) Karst., and also the possibility of influencing its resistance by means of chemical protection. The results showed that natural resistance of robinia wood to these two different agents of wood decay is not the same. It is much less resistant to the fungus Coniophora puteana (Schum. ex Fr.) Karst. than to the fungus Trametes versicolor (L. ex Fr.) Pil. Under certain conditions resistance and, consequently, durability of robinia wood can be increased, if it is impregnated with a chemical using the basis of copper-napthenate.
R Benko


Copper naphthenate-treated Southern Pine pole stubs in field exposure: - Part 1: Gradient & biodeterioration analysis 12 years after treatment
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30242
Naphthenates have been used for the preservation of timber and cellulose since their original identification in Russia in the early 1880's as part of a series of petroleum characterizations. Later work in the development of copper naphthenate as a heavy-duty preservative for poles led to the development of various treating cycles similar to other oil-borne systems. Recent work concerning the post treatment steam conditioning of copper naphthenate treated southern pine has determined that some amorphous copper naphthenate is converted to a crystalline cuprous oxide. In small laboratory tests, this was later determined to be less efficacious than copper naphthenate. This paper reviews the performance of actual pole-diameter stubs placed in a high hazard location containing both termites and potential for early decay attack. Various treating cycles were used to treat the pole stubs in this test including various post-treatment conditioning methods.
H M Barnes, M H Freeman


Tendency of the preservative use for impregnation industries in Japan
1998 - IRG/WP 98-50101-05
In Japan, since 1997, the acceptable limit of the arsenic in the waste water become to 0,1 mg/l and the additional regional severer restriction can be established. In this reason, Japanese wood preservation industries intend to use other than CCA, like DDAC, ACQ, Tanalith CuAz, copper-naphthate and zinc-naphthenate, as replacing from CCA. In Jan-June 1997, the share of CCA preservatives was less than 30% in contradiction to over 90% in Jan-June 1996.
K Suzuki


International collaborative laboratory comparison of two wood preservatives against subterranean termites: Update
1994 - IRG/WP 94-20032
It was agreed by members at the termite workshop at the 24th annual meeting of IRG in Orlando, USA, in May 1993 to initiate an international subterranean termite laboratory bioassay to compare the various preferred termite protocols used by IRG termitologists. The author was nominated to co-ordinate this comparative laboratory evaluation of two wood preservatives (CCA and Cu-naphthenate) against the subterranean termites used as test termites in the various countries. Solutions of these two wood preservatives will be prepared and impregnated into Pinus radiata wood blocks to obtain loadings of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 kg/m³ respectively. All preservative treatments will be carried out at the Division of Forest Products in Melbourne. After treatment, blocks will be dispatched to the participating researchers who will subject these specimens to attack by their test termite species. The method of comparative evaluation will be expressed using a standardised unit, namely, the amount of wood consumed (mg) per gram of termite per day per loading of wood preservative. Any termite mortality will be recorded over the test period. Apart from the intrinsic value of comparing protocols used by the various termite researchers, it is hoped that the results will assist the wood preservation industry in evaluating an economic lethal threshold level for potential wood preservatives in preventing attack and damage by major subterraneaan termite species found in the different countries. This paper reports the organisation of this collaborative study to date, lists the collaborators, and the preparation of the treated wood specimens. Delay in treatments have been experienced due to technical delays in the treatment plant. The results of the entire study will be presented to all IRG members when completed.
J R J French


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