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Termiticidal effectiveness of synthetic pyrethroids, carbaryl and chlordane in wood-block test
1985 - IRG/WP 3356
The results of some wood-block tests with allethrin, permethrin, fenvalerate, carbaryl and chlordane against Coptotermes formosanus are tabled and compared against some organophosphates, chlorpyrifos, fenitrothion, phoxim, tetrachlorvinphos and acephate. The treatment of the wood blocks was exactly as described in Document No: IRG/WP/3330. Among the pyrethroids tested, permethrin was the most effective. However this was not so effective as the organophosphates such as chlorpyrifos, phoxim and tetrachlorvinphos.
K Tsunoda


Japanese standardized methods for testing effectiveness of chemicals against termite attack
1986 - IRG/WP 1290
Japanese standard termiticide testing methods are reviewed. There are some standard testing methods provided by Japan Termite Control Association (JTCA) and Japan Wood Preserving Association (JWPA), though most of them are common to two organizations. Methods were standardized between JTCA and JWPA in 1981, and more recently examining system was established for authorizing efficacy of wood preservatives and termiticides determined by standard testing methods. English translations of Japanese standard testing methods are appended.
K Tsunoda, K Nishimoto


Laboratory bioassays with termites – The importance of termite biology
2005 - IRG/WP 05-10550
Subterranean termites are frequently used in bioassays to asses the effectiveness of insecticides or the resistance of materials. Termites which appear to be vigorous with high inherent levels of activity are often relied upon, yet at the end of the experiments survival may be very unsatisfactory, even in the favourable environment of controls. Consequently, results from such bioassays may be meaningless. Factors that can influence the vigorous performance such as: colony origin; quality of the termite supply; the physical environment; group composition and size; and the size of timber specimens, are discussed. The conclusion is that performance of a given termite source must be judged against standards and accepted levels of activity (i.e. for survival and wood consumption). Only if the experimental termites reach or exceed such minimum standards can a researcher be assured of the adequacy of the termite supply for the experiment in hand, and hence the reliability of the results of the assessment.
M Lenz


Laboratory method for testing the effectiveness of soil termiticides
1992 - IRG/WP 92-1561
In France, the protection of buildings against termites is based on a chemical treatment of wood, soil and walls. Because of the withdrawal of aldrin from the market, the need of new soil termiticides has appeared. Therefore, a laboratory method derived from Cymorek's method has been developped to assess their effectiveness. Some points are developed like the type of soil, the number of termites, the use of a reference product, the ageing tests and the evaluation criteria. Three termiticides have been tested.
M-M Serment, A-M Pruvost


Deltamethrin effectiveness against subterranean termite attack on wood under natural conditions
1989 - IRG/WP 1407
On fighting subterranean termites on wood, out of ground contact, the synthetic pyrethroid Deltamethrin shows positive aspects such as its efficiency and low mammalian toxicity. To evaluate its performance in conditions very similar to those in service use, specimens of Pinus sp were treated with solutions of Deltamethrin diluted in "white spirits" at 0.005% (w/w) and 0.01% (w/w) and exposed in a cottage higly infested with Heterotermes tenuis (Hagen, 1858) colonies. Previously to this exposition, the treated specimens were conditioned for nine months under two different environmental conditions: dry and damp. After the second inspection, performed sixteen months after the exposition to termite attack, it was found that only the specimens which had been subjected to damp conditions were attacked, most of them treated using the 0.005% (w/w) concentration level. The specimens treated but conditioned in a dry ambient were not attacked by subterranean termites.
P A Zanotto


Comparison of laboratory termite test methods
2007 - IRG/WP 07-20365
Seven standardized laboratory tests with termites were evaluated. The bioassays were made in accordance with EN 117, SAA32 E08, SAA32 E09, Ebw 02, the American Wood-Preservers’ Association (AWPA) Standard E1-97, the Japan Wood Preserving Association (JWPA) Standard 11 (1) and The Protocols for Assessment of Wood Preservatives. Two different wood preservatives each in three concentrations and additional untreated controls were tested. The test species was Reticulitermes spp., one of the most important economic genera of subterranean termites in Europe. Results and observations about evaluation and practicability of these investigations are used for a proposed ISO laboratory test for preservatives. After the introduction, we provide an overview of the biology, distribution and economic effect of the pests. Results indicate that the wood preservatives acid copper chromate (ACC) and didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC), which were tested at retentions of 1.50 kg/m3, 3.00 kg/m3 and 6.00 kg/m3 , have different thresholds (mass loss of lower than five percent) to prevent attack by Reticulitermes spp. ACC showed thresholds between 3.00 kg/m3 and 6.00 kg/m3 in most tests. With DDAC, the threshold level was achieved at retentions between 1.50 kg/m3 to 3.00 kg/m3. We conclude that a laboratory test duration of four weeks with a termite group of 150 to 200 workers and a medium sample dimension of approximately 25 x 25 x 6 mm is sufficient.
H-U Kruschinski, W Unger, A F Preston


JWPA method for testing effectiveness of surface coatings with preservatives against decay fungi
1981 - IRG/WP 2164
In 1979 JWPA established a new method for testing effectiveness of surface coatings in accordance with practical use of preservative-treated lumber. Comparing the new testing method with JIS A 9302, a few new trials - size of wood specimen, weathering procedure, and decay-test procedure - are incorporated.
K Tsunoda


IRG/COIPM INTERNATIONAL MARINE TEST - to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of water-borne salt preservatives in sea-water. Progress Report 2: Report of treatment and installation in Australia
1978 - IRG/WP 440
The purpose of this test and the procedures to be followed have been fully set out in documents distributed by the International Research Group on Wood Preservation and numbered IRG/WP/414 and IRG/WP/420. The prescriptions set out in these two documents have been closely followed.
J Beesley


IRG/COIPM INTERNATIONAL MARINE TEST - to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of water-borne salt preservatives in sea-water. Progress Report 13: Report of fourth inspection (36 months) in Australia
1981 - IRG/WP 481
This report presents the results of the fourth inspection of the IRG/COIPM International Marine Test specimens installed in Sydney Harbour in December, 1977. The inspection took place on 9th December, 1980, after 36 months exposure. Full details of the treatment and installation of the specimens, as well as results of the first three inspections (after 6, 12, and 24 months exposure), have been presented in earlier reports. All inspections of this test have been carried out in accordance with the Working Plan (see IRG/WP/414) except for an X-ray examination of the specimens. This facility is not available at the test station. In conformity with the provisions of the Working Plan, the fifth and sixth replicates of the whole test (i.e. those specimens with '5' or '6' as the final digit of their serial number) were recovered and returned to the United Kingdom after 6 months and 24 months of immersion. Thus, only four replicates remain to be examined at this and ensuing inspections.
J Beesley


Effectiveness of "Gang-Nail" plates in preventing splitting of Eucalyptus poles and Brazilian hardwood sleepers
1984 - IRG/WP 3262
This paper presents the results of some tests carried out with an anti-splitting device, placed on the end surfaces of Eucalyptus spp utility poles and Brazilian hardwood sleepers at the beginning of an air-drying period. The type of device used, a "Gang-Nail" plate, reduces significantly the splits at the end-surface of poles, but reduces only a little the splits occurring in sleepers.
A M F Oliveira, J A C Sodré, O B Neto


IRG/COIPM INTERNATIONAL MARINE TEST - to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of water-borne salt preservatives in sea-water. 2nd Interim Report
1981 - IRG/WP 477
Three reference wood species - Alstonia scholaris, Fagus sylvatica and Pinus sylvestris, untreated and treated with 3%, 6% and 10% CCA and CCB solutions were supplied to all participants for submergence at local sites. Regular examination of samples is being carried out - 6 months, 12 months and then annually for 7 years.
R A Eaton


The evaluation of synergistic effects of chemicals on fungicidal efficacy in crossed-paper tests
1991 - IRG/WP 2383
The mixing effects of wood preservatives were evaluated using the crossed-paper technique. Two filter paper strips (0.7 x 8 cm²) were treated by soaking with different chemicals [fungicides, a termiticide (chlorpyrifos or phoxim), a surface-active agent, a synergistic agent, and a stabilizer], and placed at right angles to each other on a fully grown mycelial mat of a test fungus in a Petri dish. When the four organoiodine fungicides were incorporated with chlorpyrifos or surface active agent, only 3-iodo-2-propynyl butyl carbamate (IPBC) showed the desirable synergistic effect against every wood-decaying fungus tested. Other fungicides did not always tend to produce the synergistic effect with the addition of a surface active agent. 4-Chlorophenyl-3-iodopropargyl formal (IF-1000) appeared to indicate an undesirable antagonistic effect when mixed with either chlorpyrifos or a surface active agent. 3-Bromo-2, 3 diiodo-2-propenylethyl carbamate (EBIP) did not show any synergistic action by mixing with chlorpyrifos and/or a surface active agent, although the fungicidal enhancement was induced satisfactorily by mixing the fungicide with chlorpyrifos, a stabilizer and/or a synergistic agent, especially against Tyromyces palustris and Coriolus versicolor. Similarity of the results obtained in the present investigation and in the previous laboratory decay tests leads to the conclusion that the crossed-paper technique is suitable for the evaluation of the mixing effect of chemicals on fungicidal efficacy.
Dong-heub Lee, K Tsunoda, M Takahashi


A laboratory method for assessing the effectiveness of fungicides in preventing the spread of decay fungi within packages of unseasoned lumber
1983 - IRG/WP 2202
To study the deterioration caused by decay fungi in the laboratory, a method for testing fungicides for their effectiveness in preventing spread of decay was devised. Some experiments using this method are reported here.
A J Cserjesi, E L Johnson, A Byrne


CEN Draft (38 N 460E) Standard: Test method for determining the protective effectiveness of a preservative in the marine environment
1986 - IRG/WP 4132
This European Standard describes a marine test method which provides a basis for asseasing the effectiveness of a wood preservative used to prevent attack of timber in sea-water by marine borers. The method is only suitable for testing preservatives which are intended to prevent attack by marine wood boring organisms of treated timber for use in more or less permanent contact with sea-water. It is not suitable for assessing the effectiveness of preservatives against micro-organisms. The main objective of the method described is to evaluate the relative effectiveness of a wood preservative applied by vacuum/pressure impregnation. For this reason permeable timbers are used throughout so that the protective efficacy of various retentions of the preservative can be determined. However, it is recognized that modifications of the method may be used for other purposes, e.g. to determine the relative efficacy of a preservative treatment or to determine the natural durability of the heartwood and sapwood of a selected timber species. The method is primarily intended for testing in temperate waters where Teredine and Limnoria borers dominate. However, it is also capable of being used in tropics where attack by Pholads and specific Crustacean borers may be very destructive. It has to be considered that the test has to be run for a minimum period (usually for 5 years or until the point of failure) before any interpretation of the results can be made. Variations in the test conditions can be expected from one test site to another depending on temperature, salinity, population density of the various borer species etc. This will inevitably influence the general rate of attack. However, by comparing the results obtained for samples treated with the test product with those obtained with a reference preservative and those obtained with untreated control samples, the relative protective effectiveness of the product tested can be evaluated.
G Castan


Microcapsule formulation of fenitrothion as a soil termiticide
1991 - IRG/WP 1478
The efficacy and the mode of action of a microcapsule formulation of fenitrothion against Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki were investigated. The physicochemical property that this formulation does not allow the active ingredient to diffuse through the capsule wall contributed to a long lasting efficacy and safety for the men spraying. The residual effect of the fenitrothion microcapsule in soil was revealed as well as that of chlordane in the laboratory test. It was clarified that the transmission of poisoning through the worker's self- and mutual grooming behavior contributed to the efficacy of this formulation. And it was suggested that the transmission of poisoning of fenitrothion through mutual grooming led to the collapse of a colony.
H Teshima, T Itoh, Y Abe


IRG/COIPM INTERNATIONAL MARINE TEST - to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of water-borne salt preservatives in sea-water. Progress Report 10 from Naos Island, Panama
1980 - IRG/WP 462
Blocks of 3 wood species, Beech (Fagus sylvatica), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Alstonia (Alstonia scholaris) were exposed at site number 12 at Naos Island, Panama on March 8, 1978 by John R. DePalma. The arrangement of the panels in the exposure site is as shown in Figure 1.
D W French


Laboratory evaluation of chemicals as termiticides
1986 - IRG/WP 1293
Laboratory procedures are described for screening chemicals against subterranean termites. Fast-acting compounds with persistent termiticidal activity are identified in tests using a soil substrate, and slower-acting bait toxicants are evaluated in a series of tests using cellulose substrates.
S C Jones


IRG/COIPM INTERNATIONAL MARINE TEST - to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of water-borne salt preservatives in sea-water. Progress Report 8: Panama test results
1980 - IRG/WP 458
Summary of damage to ITRG test stakes by pholadidae and teredinidae at the Panama test site - 8 Mar. '78 to 11 Oct. '79
J R De Palma


Evaluation of the effectiveness of three microbiocides in the control of sapstains
1982 - IRG/WP 3212
Results of field test on the effectiveness of BUSAN 30, CAPTAN, FOLPET against mould and sapstain in Pinus elliottii are presented. The viability of use of FOLPET in Brazil as an alternative to sodium pentachlorophenate is also discussed.
S Milano, J A A Vianna Neto


Test procedure to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of different preservatives in sea-wate
1975 - IRG/WP 414
R A Eaton


Effectiveness and synergistic effects between copper and polymer betaine
1996 - IRG/WP 96-30097
Different formulations of "Copper Amine" and Polymer Betaine were studied. During laboratory tests a synergism between both active ingredients against soft rot and dry rot has been found. The efficacy against soft rot according to the "BAM method" and the European Standard ENV 807 depends only on the amount of copper. Long term tests in a fungus cellar for determining the relative protective effectiveness in ground contact show similar results as CCA-treated wood.
H Härtner, V Barth


Termite standards questionnaire survey
1987 - IRG/WP 1324
J R J French, J P La Fage


The effectiveness test of chemicals against Serpula lacrymans
1984 - IRG/WP 2222
The effectiveness tests of wood preservatives against Serpula lacrymans were conducted in accordance with Japan Industrial Standard A 9302 and Japanese Wood Preserving Association Standard No. 1. Also, the soil treatment test against this fungus was carried out with two chemicals. The preservatives tested without Creosote oil (out of JIS) had sufficient preservative effect against Serpula lacrymans. Flutolanil for soil treatment had full effect for suppression of the hyphal growth of Serpula lacrymans onto the soil surface.
S Doi


Testing of termiticides in soil by a new laboratory method with regard to Phoxim for replacement of chlorinated hydrocarbons
1986 - IRG/WP 1292
In comparison to chlorinated hydrocarbons insecticides of the compound classes organophosphates, carbamates and pyrethroids were tested according to an earlier described soil-test in the laboratory. The following termite-species were used: Heterotermes indicola, Reticulitermes santonensis and in addition Reticulitermes flavipes, Reticulitermes lucifugus, Reticulitermes speratus and Coptotermes formosanus (Rhinotermitidae). The method gives reliable results. Criteria for evaluation are mortality and penetration of the termites into the treated soil. According to this test organophosphates, specially phoxim, have a good potential to replace chlorinated hydrocarbons.
R Pospischil


A comparative field test of the effectiveness of anti-sapstain treatments on radiata pine roundwood
1986 - IRG/WP 3376
Peeled radiata pine posts were sprayed with one of six antisapstain formulations, with and without a wax water-repellent additive, to evaluate the protection given by each treatment. After 3 months' outside storage the best treatments tested were 4% product Busan 30, 2% product Busan 1009, and 2% active sodium pentachlorophenoxide (NaPCP) with 1.5% borax. After 6 months' storage posts sprayed with Busan 30 were of sounder appearance than those sprayed with Busan 1009 or NaPCP plus borax. The effect of a water repellent on the moisture content of posts and on the severity of the fungal degrade was variable between treatments and requires further research.
J A Drysdale, R M Keirle


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