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A comparison of soft rot, white rot and brown rot in CCA, CCP, CCF, CCB, TCMTB and benzalkonium chloride treated Pinus radiata IUFRO stakes, after 9-15 years exposure at five test sites in New Zealand
1991 - IRG/WP 1485
The aim of this study was to determine if decay type varies significantly between five field trial test sites of different soil type, aspect and climate in 9-15 year old, replicate CCA, CCF, CCP. CCB, TCMTB and AAC treated IUFRO stakes. A visual on-site assessment of decay type on every test stake was made and observations confirmed by microscopical examination. Regression analyses were used to determine significant differences of percentage frequency of occurrence of each rot type between sites and preservatives. Large differences in percentage frequency of occurrence of rot type were evident between sites. One site was dominated by brown rot (85%) and two were dominated by soft rot (99 and 91%). The fourth site had intermediate proportions of brown rot (40%) and soft rot (71%) but had the second highest occurrence of white rot (32%) (highest = 37%; lowest = 11%). The fifth site was distinct in that a large proportion of stakes (69%) had both well established brown rot and soft rot. Stakes at the other four sites tended to have only one rot type. Some highly significant preservative effects were also found. Possible causes of these differences are discussed in terms of inter-site soil type, climate and other differences.
R N Wakeling


In-ground performance of two formulations of chlorothalonil after five years of exposure at three test sites in Australia
1996 - IRG/WP 96-30101
Sapwood specimens of Pinus radiata D. Don and Eucalyptus regnans F. Muell. were each treated to three retentions of each of two preservative formulations (chlorothalonil in oil; chlorothalonil plus chlorpyrifos in oil) and installed in-ground at three field test sites in Australia. Specimens were treated with each formulation to achieve 3.2, 6.4 and 12.8 kg/m³ of chlorothalonil a.i. and 3.2 + 0.2, 6.4 + 0.4 and 12.8 + 0.8 kg/m³ of chlorothalonil plus chlorpyrifos a.i. For comparison, specimens of each timber species, treated to a commercial in-ground retention of a copper-chromium-arsenic (CCA) formulation, were also installed. Treated specimens (including controls) have been rated for their condition annually for attack by subterranean termites and fungal decay using a scale ranging from 4 (sound) down to 0 (failed). After five years of exposure, mean termite and decay scores for replicate test specimens at each site reveal that the performance of all three retentions of each formulation, particularly the two highest retentions, is comparable to CCA.
J W Creffield, T L Woods, N Chew


An in-ground natural durability field test of Australian timbers and exotic reference species. Part 2: Progress report after approximately 13 years' exposure
1983 - IRG/WP 1189
The condition of heartwood specimens of Australian and exotic timber species after approximately 13 years' in-ground exposure is given. Four of the 5 test sites have a termite hazard in addition to the hazard from a range of decay fungi. Values for specimen life are given only where all replicates of a timber species have become unserviceable. Results give evidence leading to doubt about the accuracy of the tentative durability ratings previously ascribed to at least some of the species under test.
J D Thornton, G C Johnson, I W Saunders


Short term preconditioning of preservative-treated wood in soil contact in relation to performance in field trials
2000 - IRG/WP 00-20185
The effect of pre-exposure to primary colonising micro-organisms on preservative-treated wood, prior to a basidiomycete decay test, was determined by preconditioning in two soil types. Scots pine EN 113 blocks treated with 3 model systems (a triazole, a copper quaternary compound and a copper boron triazole) were leached according to EN 84 and subjected to 6 weeks and 8 weeks burial in either John Innes no. 2 (a loam-based horticultural compost) or soil from the Simlångsdalen field site in Sweden. The samples were then tested according to the method described in EN 113. Selective isolations were also performed after soil exposure and compared with those from a longer term field trial. Preconditioning lowered the effectiveness of the 2 copper containing preservatives. Some effect of soil pre-exposure could be noted with the triazole but this was limited. The fungal isolations from preconditioned EN 113 blocks and field exposed stakes were a similar mixture of soft rot and mould fungi. Bacteria were commonly isolated from the preconditioned wood. The role of these micro-organisms in the modification of the preservatives is currently being investigated.
S Molnar, D J Dickinson


Sequential exposure of borate treated Douglas-fir to multiple Formosan subterranean termite colonies in a 40-week field test
1993 - IRG/WP 93-10006
Douglas-fir boards (ca. 74.5 g) pressure-treated with disodium octaborate tetrahydrate (DOT) retentions of 0 (controls), 0.88, 1.23, 1.60, or 2.10% (weight/weight) DOT were sequentially exposed to four active field colonies of Formosan subterranean termites, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae), in an above-ground field test. Samples were placed in contact with each colony for 10 weeks, with oven-dry weight losses determined between exposures, for a total termi exposure period of 40 weeks. Feeding activity differed among termite colonies, with the control wood samples having mean weight losses of 1.3-15.1% of their initial weight during each individual 10-week termite exposure. The two lower borate retentions (0.88 and 1.23% DOT) were virtually equal efficacy, with mean wood weight losses during each individual 10-week exposure ranging from 1.2-4.6%. Feeding was negligible at the two higher borate retentions, with mean wood weight losses from termite feeding during each 10-week period ranging from 0.7-1.3% with 1.60% DOT, and 0.3-0.9% with 2.10% DOT. Total cumulative wood weight losses over the 40 week exposure were: 10.2% (0.88% DOT), 8.7% (1.23% DOT), 3.6% (1.60% DOT), and 2.4% (2.10% DOT).
J K Grace, R T Yamamoto


Copper naphthenate-treated Southern Pine pole stubs in field exposure. -Part 2: Chemical characterization of full size pole stubs 12 years after treatment
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30246
This study examines the influence of pre-treatment and post-treatment steaming on the character and physio-chemical nature of copper naphthenate in hydrocarbon solvent treated pine in larger, pole diameter, pole stub-length samples. This work is the continuation of two projects that began almost a decade ago. Previous reports indicated that certain morphological changes might occur in small laboratory steamed samples of copper naphthenate treated southern pine. Toluene-methanol extraction, UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) were used to investigate the nature and properties of the copper naphthenate present in the wood after 12 years of exposure. The formation of solid cuprous oxide occurred regardless of pre- or post-steaming conditioning.
H M Barnes, D P Kamdem, M H Freeman


Biological effectiveness of ground-contact wood preservatives as determined by field exposure stake tests
1984 - IRG/WP 3297
Field exposure tests conducted on stakes treated with different creosotes, mixtures of creosote and waxy oil as well as different CCA wood preservatives over a period of 25 years, gave the following results: The CCA preservatives provided excellent biological protection to treated stakes, especially against fungal attack. The CCA Type I, currently approved for use under South African conditions is not inferior to the CCA Type II during long-term ground-contact exposure if the active elemental contents and effective retentions are taken into consideration. The creosotes provided good protection against termite attack but showed fairly poor fungal resistance during long-term ground-contact exposure under wet conditions. The addition of waxy oil greatly improved the effectiveness of creosotes against fungal attack. The CCA preservatives proved to be a better overall ground-contact preservative compared with the creosotes.
W E Conradie, A Pizzi


Development of decay in untreated, second-growth Douglas-Fir using two exposure techniques in North Queensland
1997 - IRG/WP 97-20110
The results of two exposure techniques for evaluating the development of wood decay in untreated, mill-run lumber from second-growth Douglas-fir containing both sapwood and heartwood are presented. Nominal 50 mm by 100 mm by 2.5 m (2 in. by 4 in. by 8 ft) lumber, No 2 and better, was obtained from a production run in a mill that was processing second growth, Coastal Douglas-fir in western Oregon, USA. Untreated wood members were kiln dried, then shipped to Queensland. At the Timber Research Laboratory, Indooroopilly, Queensland, two units for above-ground exposure were fabricated from each 2.5-m (8-ft) untreated member. A 600-mm (2-ft) length was cut from each end of each member. One 600-mm section was transversely bisected, forming two, 300-mm (12in.) units; the other 600-mm section was used in a separate study. The middle 1200-mm (4-ft) length was used as one exposure unit. These shorter members were then milled to form a joint with a 100-mm (4-in.) overlap. Two holes were drilled through the overlapping portions, and the two sections were bolted together. The identity of the 1200mm length and the end-matched lapped jointed section was maintained throughout the exposure. Both units were positioned on a horizontal support approximately 1 m above ground in an open field near Innisfail, Queensland. As units were installed in the field, all cut surfaces inside the joint and at the ends were brush coated with a commercially available (in Australia) copper naphthenate emulsion containing 1% copper. Decay was first detected after 2 years of exposure and it advanced rapidly during the third year. The pattern of results suggests that the weathering of the upper, exterior surface and the retention of a high moisture content by the 50-mm-thick wood, when wetted, is more important in predisposing wood to decay than is end-grain absorption of moisture. Decay ratings for the 1200-mm members were equivalent to those observed with the lapped joints. The two types of units are of equal utility in demonstrating the potential for decay in a wood material that has natural susceptibility to decay.
J Norton, S Kleinschmidt, R C De Groot, D Crawford


Effect of felling time related to lunar calendar on the durability of wood and bamboo -Fungal degradation during above ground exposure test for 2 years- (Preliminary report)
2005 - IRG/WP 05-20311
Current study was carried out to know whether the felling time of trees and bamboos based on lunar calendar affects natural durability of felled wood-bamboo or not. Each of one sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) tree of 28 years old and one Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla) of around 3 years old was cut 12 times between February and December in 2003. Six sets of sugi tree and bamboo were felled in a day during “Hassen” period and the other 6 sets of them were also felled in a nearby non-“Hassen” day. There is a belief that “Hassen” should be avoided to perform destructive works such as cutting trees. “Hassen” lasting 12 days based on lunar calendar appears 6 times every year. After felling sample trees and bamboos, these specimens were subject to outdoor exposure at above ground level for 2 years. Properties of specimens such as moisture contents, mould and fungal resistance were examined periodically for 2 years. There was no clear difference in the degree of mould growth on the surface between specimens felled in a “Hassen” day and those felled in a non-“Hassen” day in the same month. The felling seasons, however, influenced the growth of mould on the surface of wood and bamboo clearly, which has been traditionally known in many cases. Fungal degradation evaluated by visual observation and the depth of pin penetration using Pilodyn during 2 years exposure was not affected by not only “Hassen” or non-“Hassen” also seasons when tree and bamboo felled.
K Yamamoto, S Uesugi, K Kawakami


Comparison of decay rates of preservative-treated stakes in field and fungus cellar tests. Results after 40 months fungal cellar exposure
1983 - IRG/WP 2200
Decay rates of preservative-treated Pinus radiata stakes during 40 months exposure in the FRI fungus cellar were compared with those of similarly treated material in a field test. Decay rates in the fungus cellar were from 4 to 100 times higher than in the field, although for the majority of preservatives the rate was between 7 and 12 times higher. The lag phase before onset of decay, noticeable with most of the preservatives in the field test, was largely eliminated in the fungus cellar. Possible reasons are given for inconsistencies in relative rates of decay of preservatives in the two tests.
M E Hedley


Correlation between different international standard assessment procedures with termites. Part 1: Field exposure
1983 - IRG/WP 1198
Ramin treated with copper-chrome-arsenic (CCA), pentachlorophenate and lindane, each at three retentions, and three other untreated timbers were assessed in the field against Coptotermes lacteus and Nasutitermes exitiosus. Replicate specimens were exposed around five mounds of each termite species over a period of five years in south-eastern Australia. The field results provided the basis for judgement of corresponding laboratory trials conducted accordingly to the standard procedures of Europe, U.S.A. and Australia. In the field none of the wood preservative treatments with-stood termite attack for the full period of five years, not even CCA at the highest retention of 2.3 kg/m³. Merbau and Jarrah were the most resistant timbers but there was noticeable variation between trees.
M Lenz, C D Howick, N Tamblyn, J W Creffield, M Westcott


Moisture condition in treated wood exposed outdoors. A progress report
1989 - IRG/WP 3533
Wood treated with water-borne preservatives, mainly CCA (copper/chromium/arsenic), CCB (copper/chrome/boron) or CC (copper/chrome) is often said among users in Sweden to absorb more water than untreated wood. In laboratory tests this statement has not been confirmed but no field tests have been carried out in Sweden to study this phenomenon. In 1986 a project was started to compare water absorption during outdoor exposure between wood stakes of pine (Pinus sylvestris) and spruce (Picea abies) both untreated and treated with different preservatives. For comparison stakes of different species were included as well as painted pine stakes. Equilibrium moisture content in humid environment was tested for untreated pine-stakes and stakes treated with CCA and ammoniacal copper preservatives.
M-L Edlund, C E Sundman


Co-operative research project on L-joint testing. Progress report to March 1984
1984 - IRG/WP 2211
Each participant was intended to expose L-joints in the main trial on 1 April 1983 and the first sampling, after 8 months exposure, was to be undertaken on 1 December 1983. Some participants have had to vary this schedule. Results are presented from CTFT (France) and PRL (United Kingdom). These show a greater effectiveness by the double vacuum treatments compared with the 1 minute dip treatments. However, results from the two locations differ particularly in the incidence and type of Basidiomycetes isolated.
J K Carey, A F Bravery


An in-ground natural durability field test of Australian timbers and exotic reference species. Part 5: Extensive data from a site where both decay and termites are active. Results from a full-replicated set of heartwood specimens from each of ten myrtaceous hardwoods after 18, 19 and 20 years' exposure - A discussion paper
1988 - IRG/WP 2324
Extensive data are presented on the decay situation, the termite situation and the decay-termite associations; all gathered from a fully-replicated set of heartwood specimens of 10 hardwood timbers after 18, 19 and 20 years' exposure in the ground at a single test site, i.e. a semi-arid steppe site. Sixteen tables are presented in addition to the one table providing the rating data; the latter representation of specimen condition being essentially all the data normally being recorded from field tests, whether these be of natural durability or preservative treated specimens. The authors give this "extra" data to show the type of information obtainable as a result of applying both mycological and entomological expertise to field assessments. Instead of discussing these results. the authors wish to generate some discussion by asking questions such as - is some of all of this information of value? - What additional/alternative information would interested scientists wish to see with respect to the most durable timbers in a test such as that examined in this report?
J D Thornton, G C Johnson, J W Creffield


International comparison of three field methods for assessing the in-ground termite resistance of materials - highlights after two years
1999 - IRG/WP 99-20157
First-year results of a comparative study, evaluating the in-ground termite resistance of a range of materials, including CCA and ACQ-treated timbers, using the below-ground exposure, ground contact and graveyard methods against diverse termite faunas were provided in IRG/WP/98-20132. Further annual inspections have confirmed early trends and identified notable differences between sites and methods. Termites have contacted specimens more frequently at tropical sites, irrespective of the method, and in below-ground exposure trials, irrespective of site. Overall, levels of fungal decay have been low. Fungal decay was more prevalent in specimens using the ground-contact and graveyard methods. Notable levels of termite attack have been recorded for some CCA- and ACQ-treated Pinus radiata specimens at the retention of 2kg/m3, after two years or only one year (Phuket, Thailand). Some specimens of the durable timber bald cypress (Taxodium distichum) have sustained significant levels of termite attack and fungal decay.
M Lenz, J W Creffield, A F Preston, B M Kard, C Vongkaluang, Y Sornnuwat


Effect of angle of exposure on degradation of radiata pine during weathering trials
1988 - IRG/WP 2301
The importance of angle of exposure on the degree of weathering of materials has not been adequately resolved. In conventional tests, specimens are exposed at an angle of 45° facing the equator, but more recently experiments on polymeric materials have suggested that an angle of 0° may be preferable since this angle maximises levels of received ultra-violet radiation. In this paper the degradation of Radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) during weathering was assessed at 5 angles of exposure (0°, 45°, 60°, 70°, 90°) over 50 days by measuring changes in weight and chemical composition. In order to confirm previous observations measurements of received ultra-violet radiation (< 320 nm) at these angles of exposure were also made using polysulphone polymer film dosimeters. Roth weight loss and chemical data indicate that degradation of Radiata pine during weathering was negatively correlated (p < 0.001) with increasing angle of exposure. The implications of these findings for the conduct of weathering trials are discussed.
P D Evans


BRE Experience in monitoring decay in out-of-ground exposure trials
1995 - IRG/WP 95-20077
The outdoor field trial has always been regarded as the ultimate test of performance for assessing the effectiveness of a wood preservative. For this reason, the Building Research Establishment (BRE) has invested much effort in such trials over many years. Emphasis in early trials was on ground contact tests which were the basis both for assessing the likely performance of a preservative in protecting posts and poles, and for classifying a timber&apos;s natural resistance to fungal decay. When preservation of timber in the building and construction industry assumed greater importance, the emphasis was placed on the development of out-of-ground field trials to provide data on the likely performance of exterior joinery work in buildings. For these tests, the exposure conditions provided a less severe hazard for out-of-ground timber than for wood permanently in contact with the ground. Out-of-ground trials have been running at BRE since 1967 (Orsler and Smith, 1993) initially using T-joints and L-joints and later the window joinery test rig was established to provide conditions close to those in buildings (Purslow, 1975). All the early trials were assessed only by visual assessment for decay. Later still, small L-joints with a coating (the methodology which was used as the basis for EN 330) were used for a comprehensive study to establish the pattern of colonisation by microorganisms and associated changes to the wood. It was established that the basidiomycete fungi ultimately responsible for the decay are the climax of a colonisation sequence of a range of types of fungi plus bacteria (Carey, 1980). In an attempt to give early indications of long term performance, colonisation by basidiomycetes and changes in the porosity of the wood during exposure have been used as the basis for assessing performance relative to that of a reference preservative (1.0% tri n-butyltin oxide). Hyphen joints were introduced (Orsler and Holland, 1993) for studies of preservative distribution.
J K Carey, R J Orsler


Copper naphthenate-treated Southern Pine pole stubs in field exposure: - Part 1: Gradient & biodeterioration analysis 12 years after treatment
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30242
Naphthenates have been used for the preservation of timber and cellulose since their original identification in Russia in the early 1880&apos;s as part of a series of petroleum characterizations. Later work in the development of copper naphthenate as a heavy-duty preservative for poles led to the development of various treating cycles similar to other oil-borne systems. Recent work concerning the post treatment steam conditioning of copper naphthenate treated southern pine has determined that some amorphous copper naphthenate is converted to a crystalline cuprous oxide. In small laboratory tests, this was later determined to be less efficacious than copper naphthenate. This paper reviews the performance of actual pole-diameter stubs placed in a high hazard location containing both termites and potential for early decay attack. Various treating cycles were used to treat the pole stubs in this test including various post-treatment conditioning methods.
H M Barnes, M H Freeman


Leaching of active components from preservative-treated timber - Ongoing research: Status after approx. 4 months’ out-door exposure
2003 - IRG/WP 03-20276
The Danish Technological Institute is together with manufacturers of active ingredients and formulators of wood preservatives running a project aiming at finding realistic leaching rates from preservative treated wood in hazard class 3 (above ground). The project is focussed on developing a field trial method for investigating leaching. According to BPD hazard assessment has to be carried out for biocide products and a part of that includes possible environmental impact of preservative treated wood. Leaching of active ingredients from treated wood has to be measured and assessed. Several organisations (CEN, OECD and others) are in progress of developing laboratory leaching test methods. In order to give more realistic data for leaching of active ingredients it is important to study natural exposure. According to recent publications (IRG/WP 01-50171), it appears to be a significant difference between natural leaching and laboratory leaching methods and a relative comparison is, therefore, needed. Data from close to practice applications are important in order to support products in the BPD. Furthermore, the results are needed to provide benchmarking data to allow other laboratory or accelerated leaching data to be put into perspective. The results from the project are intended to serve as part of the basic documentation for leaching of active ingredients in hazard class 3. Panels are exposed outdoors under natural conditions at the field trial at Danish Technological Institute and the leachate is collected and monitored by chemical analysis of the active ingredients. The project is ongoing and the paper presents results from approximately 6 months of exposure. The study includes commercially available organic and in-organic fungicides using 4 different application methods: pressure-, vacuum-, flow-coat- and supercritical treated wood. Different test set-ups are investigated and the results obtained from outdoor exposure will be compared with a laboratory test method (CEN/OECD). Furthermore, the laboratory method suggested by CEN/OECD is evaluated and suggestions for improvement are stated.
N Morsing


The performance of metal-chromium-arsenic formulations after 32 to 38 years' in-ground exposure in Australia
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30240
Two trials of metal-chromium-arsenic preservatives were exposed in-ground in Australia. In Trial 1, Pinus radiata stakes treated with Boliden K.33, Boliden S.25, Celcure A, Tanalith C and Tanalith CA were installed at Sydney and Narrandera in 1961/1962. In Trial 2, P. radiata and Eucalyptus regnans sapwood were treated with Celcure A, Celcure A21-N, Celcure A 21-O and Tanalith CA (new) and installed at Sydney and Innisfail in 1966/1967. In Trial 1, all metal-chromium-arsenic preservatives at 8 and 12 kg m-3 gave median specimen lives in excess of 35 years. As none of the stakes treated to 12 kg m-3 with Boliden K.33, Celcure A, Tanalith C or Tanalith CA had become unserviceable, the minimum guarantee period for these preservatives is greater than the present exposure periods. In Trial 2, the four CCA preservatives when impregnated into P. radiata sapwood at 12 kg m-3 gave median specimen lives at Sydney of greater than 32.5 years. With E. regnans sapwood treated to 12 kg m-3, only Celcure A 21-0 gave a median specimen life at Sydney of greater than 32.5 years. At the high decay and termite hazard site of Innisfail, Celcure A 21-0 protected the eucalypt better than any of the other CCA formulations.
G C Johnson, J D Thornton, J Beesley


Pentachlorophenol and tributyltin oxide - the performance of treated Pinus radiata after 12 years' exposure
1986 - IRG/WP 3361
Pinus radiata samples were impregnated with a range of light organic solvent preservatives and copper/chrome/arsenic salt and exposed with no surface coating both in and above ground for 12 years. Inspection of the test samples revealed that some formulations of light organic solvent preservatives will give good fungal protection and reduce splitting in Pinus radiata exposed externally without a supplementary surface coating. Tributyltin oxide performed poorly in the test compared to pentachlorophenol which gave relatively good protection under both hazard conditions. Copper/chrome/arsenic salt was clearly the most effective.
R S Johnstone


Evaluation of teak sawdayst Tectona grandis L Fil as a potential source to obtain a natural wood preservative in Colombia
2004 - IRG/WP 04-30356
Plantation Teak (Tectona grandis L. Fil) has been tested as a possible source of natural wood preservatives due to the known excellent durability of old-growth teak wood. Field tests (ground proximity termite and above ground simulated decking exposures) were established in Colombia in April 2003 at two different test sites with different climates (Tropical Dry and Rain forest). Teak heartwood extracts were obtained using Soxhlet extraction with chloroform-methanol and methanol-ethanol as solvents, for two different mixtures at three different concentrations. Sapwood stakes of Patula pine (Pinus patula) and Globulos eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus) were vacuum pressure impregnated with these extracts, and control stakes were impregnated with CCA Type C and ACQ Type D at two nominal retentions (1 and 4kg/m3). The test sites have been found to be very active for both decay and termites. After only 9 months exposure termite attack has been observed from four species (Nasutitermes, Heterotermes, Triangularitermes, Velocitermes), and several basidiomycetes fungi have also been isolated from the test samples (Trametes, Schisophyllum, Poria). The results show that up to 100% of the samples have been subject to fungal attack, although in most samples only superficial trace attack has occurred in the exposure period. In contrast, termite attack has been rapid, primarily on the eucalyptus samples, which are suffering substantial degradation.
A Castillo, Y Cabrera, A F Preston, R Morris


Leaching of Boron - more than 3 years of field exposure
1997 - IRG/WP 97-30143
The diffusibility of Boron in wood and thus the ability of its leaching is known since long. Nevertheless quantitative data on this process are only rarely available. To overcome this lack of information field exposure tests were started with beam-segments treated with pure boric acid and poles treated with CCB. In addition some of the beam-segments were surface-treated with a varnish to investigate the long-term protective effect of a surface coat on leaching of Boron. Detailed data of more than three years of field exposure are now available and will be presented. 46% and 15%, respectively, of the initial Boron content were leached from the uncoated and the coated beam-segments. The poles lost about 30% of Boron, 1,3% of Copper and 0,05% of Chromium.
A Peylo, H Willeitner


Environmentally benign wood preservatives based on organic biocide antioxidant combinations: A brief review of laboratory and field exposure results and discussion of a proposed mechanism
2004 - IRG/WP 04-30335
The combination of various organic biocides with commercial antioxidants generally increased the biocides’ efficacy 2-3 fold against wood-destroying fungi in short-term laboratory decay tests, and some positive results have been obtained after 2-4 years of outdoor exposure. The two antioxidants principally examined, propyl gallate and butylated hydroxytoluene, are low cost and, since both are food additives, benign. The biocides studied have either been examined as potential wood preservatives or are used in commercial wood preservative systems. The purpose of this paper is to: 1) briefly summarize our prior laboratory decay results; 2) briefly discuss results obtained so far from outdoor exposure tests, both above-ground and ground-contact exposure; 3) discuss differences in results between laboratory decay tests and the outdoor exposure data; and 4) propose a mechanism by which antioxidants could protect wood.
T Schultz, D D Nicholas, W Henry, C Pittman, D Wipf, B Goodell


International comparison of three field methods for assessing the in-ground resistance of preservative-treated and untreated wood to termites and fungal decay – Summary of observations after five years
2003 - IRG/WP 03-20261
Results are presented from a five-year study conducted in five locations in Australia, Thailand and the USA. Three methods of exposure were assessed (below-ground, graveyard and ground contact) for evaluating the in-ground termite and decay resistance of Pinus radiata D. Don sapwood stakes that had been vacuum pressure impregnated with CCA (Type C) and ACQ (Type D) each at two nominal retentions (2 and 4 kg/m3), and of outer heartwood stakes from five trees of the durable North American Baldcypress, Taxodium distichum (L.) Rich. The termite attack and fungal decay ratings, based on the loss of cross section of the stakes, declined more rapidly at the three tropical sites in southern Thailand (Phuket) and in northern Australia (Darwin) compared to the two more temperate sites in southern USA (Gulfport, Mississippi) and southern Australia (Griffith, New South Wales). Depending on the type of preservative treatment (detailed for termites only) the three different assessment methods yielded either similar trends (ACQ 2 kg/m3; baldcypress) or outcomes varied with site and method (CCA 2 kg/m3; CCA 4 kg/m3) or the three assessment methods could be ranked from most to least effective in the same sequence across all sites (ACQ 4 kg/m3). Treatments or type of timber elicited different responses from the local termite fauna (from readily contacted by termites to avoidance). These responses can be modified by the way specimens are presented to termites. Average [n = 15] termite attack ratings (1st value Australian, 2nd value ASTM rating) after 5 years in the tropics (T) and non-tropics (NT) were: CCA 2 kg/m3 T = 4.3/6, NT = 6.7/8; CCA 4 kg/m3 T =5.5/7, NT = 7.4/9; ACQ 2 kg/m3 T = 4.4/6 , NT = 6.9/9; ACQ 4 kg/m3 T = 5.4/7, NT = 7.1/9. Baldcypress was more durable in the USA and Thailand (slight attack) and least durable against Mastotermes darwiniensis Froggatt in Australia (moderate attack). Fungus decay ratings (1st value Australian, 2nd value ASTM rating) after 5 years were: CCA 2 kg/ m3 T = 5.1/7, NT = 7.9/9; CCA 4 kg/m3 T = 6.1/8. NT = 7.8/9; ACQ 2 kg/m3 T = 5.2/7, NT = 6.7/9; ACQ 4 kg/m3 T = 5.6/8, NT = 7.7/9. Baldcypress results varied with source tree and test method.
M Lenz, J W Creffield, T A Evans, B M Kard, C Vongkaluang, Y Sornnuwat, A F Preston


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