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Efficacy of some extractives from Pinus heartwood for protection of Pinus radiata sapwood against biodeterioration. Part 1: Fungal decay
1995 - IRG/WP 95-30072
Chemical compounds thought to contribute to the natural durability of heartwood of Pinus spp. were either chemically synthesised in the laboratory or extracted from the heartwood of Pinus elliottii or Pinus caribaea. These compounds included the stilbenes, pinosylvin and its mono- and di-methyl ethers, and the flavonoids, pinobanksin and pinocembrin. Small blocks of Pinus radiata sapwood were impregnated with methanolic solutions of pure compounds or heartwood extracts, to a range of retentions extending above and below the concentration of each compound known to occur in the heartwood of Pinus spp.. Fungicidal efficacy of these compounds has been evaluated by exposure of treated blocks to pure cultures of a white and a brown rot, in addition to an unsterile soil test.
M J Kennedy, J A Drysdale, J Brown


Protection of Ochroma pyramidale from fungal decay with N,N-napthaloylhyroxylamine
1998 - IRG/WP 98-30182
Fungal decay of wood in service results in billions of dollars (U.S.) in losses annually. Recent environmental restrictions, both U.S. and international, are limiting and eliminating the use of broad-spectrum, heavy metal biocides for wood preservation. Restrictions result primarily from problems with disposal. New wood preservatives need to be developed and tested which specifically target key elements in the sequence of fungal decay mechanisms. Our laboratory has been experimenting with chemicals which inhibit pectin hydrolysis during incipient brown-rot and white-rot decay in southern pine sapwood (Inter. Biodeter. Biodegrad. 39:103). In the present paper these results are extended to include the tropical hardwood Ochroma pyramidale (balsa). Balsa blocks (24x18x12mm) were exposed to two brown-rot fungi and one white-rot fungus in ASTM soil block tests for 10 weeks. CCA (6.4 km/m3 ) was compared with the calcium binding agent N,N-napthaloylhydroxylamine (NHA; 1.6, 3.2 & 6.4 km/m3 ) in leached and unleached blocks. CCA protected balsa with minimal weight loss (> 7.4%) with no leaching effects. NHA (6.4 km/m3 ) protected balsa (0.3-1.2%) weight loss but leaching raised the weight losses to 25% with the brown-rot fungus Tyromyces palustris. We conclude that NHA can protect balsa against G. trabeum and T. versicolor with comparable efficiency to CCA (leached and unleached) but not T. palustris.
F Green III, T L Highley


Mechanisms of Protection by NHA Against Fungal Decay
2002 - IRG/WP 02-10429
Treating wood with the water-borne sodium salt of N'-N-naphthaloylhydroxylamine (Na-NHA) protects wood against decay and termite damage. Initial testing indicated little or no inhibition of sapstain fungi, molds, or soft-rot fungi by Na-NHA, suggesting that the mechanism by which this compound protected wood was complex and not that of a broad-spectrum biocide. Previously, we (Green et al, 1997) suggested that the protective mechanism was due to Na-NHA complexing with calcium ions to disrupt fungal metabolism, and/or binding of Na-NHA to the calcium in pit membranes, which acts as a physical barrier to fungal colonization. More recent experiments suggest an alternate mechanism. Specifically, pKa measurements of Na-NHA show that the sodium salt will be essentially fully protonated when impregnated into SYP which is naturally acidic (pH at or below 5.5). Furthermore, the protonated form (H-NHA) was more fungicidal than Na-NHA against two white- and two brown-rot fungi, with the bioactivity approaching that of several commercial organic fungicides. The moderate fungicidal activity of H-NHA is not surprising; the compound is a polyaromatic hydrocarbon much like many of the compounds in creosote. By precipitating mainly at the pit membranes, H-NHA or Ca-NHA serves as a fungicidal barrier to inhibit fungal hyphae from spreading to adjacent cells through the pits. Studies of H-NHA combined with three commercial organic biocides showed that only one combination was synergistic, which further suggests that NHA protects wood by a biocidal mechanism rather than being simply a compound is extremely water insoluble and will thus not leach from wood in outdoor exposure. NHA may also have metal chelating and/or antioxidant properties which further assists in protecting wood. non-biocidal additive.
F Green III, W Henry, T Schultz


Biological Protection of Composite Panel from Moulds and Decay
2007 - IRG/WP 07-10612
Composite panels, such as oriented strand board (OSB), are widely used in house construction in North America. These structural panels are normally made of non-durable wood species and are susceptible to moulds and decay when exposed to wet conditions. Building envelope failures due to moulds, decay or poor construction practices can negatively impact the image of wood. To ensure durability of composite panels, the most important consideration is the use of mould- and decay-resistant wood species to prevent fungal attack. Using low environmental impact technology to improve the durability of composite products could have market-related advantages over using chemical protection products. This research aimed to explore various potential biological treatments to protect composite panels from biodegradation, and to increase durability of panels for better resistance to mould and decay infection in service.
Dian-Qing Yang, Xiang-Ming Wang, Hui Wan


Laboratory evaluation of borate amine: Copper derivatives in wood for fungal decay
2010 - IRG/WP 10-30543
The aims of this study were to evaluate borate: amine: copper derivatives in wood for fungal decay protection as well as the permanence of copper and boron in wood. Wood treated with each of four derivatives of borate:amine:copper prevented fungal decay. Disodium tetraborate ecahydrate (Borax):amine:copper derivatives with retentions of 0.61 to 0.63% after water leaching prevented decay by Gloeophylum trabeum (Gt) and 0.64% by Trametes versicolor (Tv). Leaching did not decrease decay resistance to both Gt and Tv. Disodium octaborate tetrahydrate(DOT):amine:copper derivatives with retentions of 1.14 to 2.93% after water leaching prevented decay by Gt and 0.54 to 1.19 % by Tv. Leaching decreased decay resistance to Gt but not to Tv. Higher copper and boron in disodium borax:amine:copper derivatives contributed to more decay resistance to Gt and Tv than that of DOT:amine:copper derivatives as evidenced by elemental analysis. Infrared spectra (IR ) of wood treated with 5% borate: amine: copper derivatives after water leaching showed that increased absorption at 1632-1635 cm-1 compared with the control. The increased absorption at 1632-1635 cm-1 was partly attributable to carbonyl of copper carboxylates from oxidation of hemiacetals of hemicelluloses and cellulose by copper (II) ions, and carbonyls of copper (II) quinone methides by oxidation of guaicyls by copper (II) ions. It was also partly attributable to carbonyls of copper carboxylates from hemicelluloses and phenolates from lignin through ion exchange reactions. The above oxidation and ion exchange reactions of copper with wood components may account for their efficacy and long term performance.
G Chen


Liquefied wood polyols: a bio-based preservative for protection of wood from fungal decay
2018 - IRG/WP 18-30725
The liquefaction of wood is one of promising approaches in utilization of woody waste which is generated during primary and secondary processing of wood and liquefied wood having various application including bio-based preservatives. The biological degradation of wood due to fungi is the major problem encountered in indoor and outdoor utilization of wood. In this study, woody waste recovered from wood based industry was liquefied in phenol, glycerol and polyethylene glycol as liquefying media under defined reaction condition to produce chemically active liquid. These liquefied woods were used as preservatives and its efficacy were evaluated after impregnation of wood against fungi. The level of impregnation of preservative in wood was estimated by the weight percent gain after impregnation and the changes were characterized by FTIR and NMR spectroscopy. The melia wood samples have been impregnated with liquefied wood and untreated wood sample were also exposed to a brown rot (Polyporus meliae and Oligoporus placentus) and a white rot (Trametes hirsuta (Wulf. Ex Fr.) and Trametes versicolor (L. Ex Fr.) fungus for 16 weeks under laboratory conditions as per IS: 4873 (Part I), 2008. Investigation indicated that phenolated wood inhibited fungal growth in the wood. The fungicidal traits of phenolated wood showed higher antifungal efficacy against both white rot and brown rot of wood whereas wood samples impregnated with liquefied wood in glycerol and polyethylene glycol shows insignificant effects on growth of fungus and is similar infested as to control samples. The increased fungal resistance of phenolated wood indicates liquefied wood polyols has a promising potential for treatment of wood against natural wood decaying agents. The liquefaction of wood opens up new avenues for utilization of woody waste for development of organic preservative which is environmental friendly and also provides greener and sustainable option to the world for present and coming generation.
A Kumar, G Vijaylakshmi, S Singh Chauhan


Using X-ray scattering to elucidate the mechanisms behind the moisture and fungal decay resistance of epoxybutene modified wood
2019 - IRG/WP 19-40854
Chemical modification of the hydroxyl groups of wood can improve the properties of wood by providing moisture and biological resistance, as well as dimensional stability. Southern pine solid wood was chemically modified to various weight percentage gains (WPG) with epoxybutene (EpB, 8%-38% WPG). After modification, specimens were extracted with a toluene: ethanol (2:1) solution for 2 hours or water leached for 2 weeks. The equilibrium moisture content (EMC) at 30%, 65% and 90% relative humidity (RH) and 27 C was determined on all specimens. Laboratory soil block decay evaluations against the brown-rot fungus Gloeophyllum trabeum was performed and weight loss calculated by mass loss. Biological efficacy was found, and the biological resistance correlated with the lowering of the equilibrium moisture content, suggesting that the mechanism of efficacy was due to moisture exclusion. To assist in understanding the mechanism of effectiveness, small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) were both performed. Preliminary WAXS results showed that the modification did not significantly change the cellulose crystalline lattice parameters. Preliminary SAXS results showed that epoxide addition led to an increased polydispersity in the microfibril alignment and broader microfibril angle distributions, thus, suggesting that modification may target regions outside the microfibrils. Further experimentation is underway to confirm these results.
R E Ibach, N Plaza


Questionnaire - Fungal decay types
1985 - IRG/WP 1265
T Nilsson


An attempt to evaluate wood resistance against fungal decay in non-sterile conditions by measuring the variation of resistance to bending test
1988 - IRG/WP 2308
The main object of this work was to determine the variation of strength on large test specimens of wood (800 x 45 x 45 mm³) when exposed to accelerated fungal attacks close to natural conditions, out of test vessels. The modulus of elasticity (MOE) and the modulus of rupture (MOR) have been assessed. Thereby, the natural resistance of the wood species to fungal decay, the efficiency of preservative as well as the treatment applied are discussed. The wood tested is a guianese secondary species (Couma guianensis). The fungi tested are two guianese strains of brown and white rot. The exposure time is 12 weeks. No mould contamination has been recorded by use of a selective fungicide. The results obtained show that it is possible to infest in nonsterile conditions large wood specimens. Furthermore, modulus of rupture appears to be the most reliable criterion. The investigation, that requires limited equipment and staff could be performed in any tropical research station as it has been done at CTFT, French Guiana center.
L N Trong


A direct method for testing plywood and particle boards against fungal decay
1984 - IRG/WP 2214
A method directly inspired from the French standard testing method of the resistance of particle boards against fungal decay (AFNOR N° 51.295 May 1980) is described. But in that experimentation, the infestation is localized and realized in non sterile conditions. Small blocks of Fagus sylvatica (60 x 20 x 10 mm³) used as " inoculates " are infested with basidiomycetes, in Kolle flask for 4 to 6 weeks, then tightly pressed against the middle part of the test specimens (190 x 15 x 15 mm³). The lower part of the inoculates is plunged in vermiculite kept constantly humid by water containing a selective fungicide. After twelve weeks of exposure in non sterile conditions, in a green house with constant temperature around 20°C, the test specimens are then submitted to a static bending test until fracture. The comparison of the fracture-stress between control test specimens and the specimens exposed to wood rotting basidiomycetes permits to evaluate the resistance of the studied materials against fungal decay.
L N Trong


Termite and decay protection - A superficial barrier field test
1983 - IRG/WP 3257
Samples of Pinus radiata were given a superficial barrier treatment and installed in the ground at two sites for five years to observe termite and fungal attack. The three best treatments of the series were Denso petroleum tape, Koppers hot dip tar enamel, and Arquad 2C/75 alkyl ammonium compound. As new fungicides and insecticides become available they are being added to the test using the same system of treatment and exposure.
R S Johnstone, W D Gardner


Efficacy of anhydrides as wood protection chemicals - II. Performance against soft rot fungi
1998 - IRG/WP 98-30174
Pine sapwood modified with various anhydrides and with butyl isocyanate was tested for its resistance to soft rot decay. Small stakes were exposed for 20 months in unsterile soil in a fungal cellar test. Wood modified with butyl isocyanate performed better than any of the anhydrides tested, with a threshold level of protection (less than 3% weight loss) at 12% weight percent gain (WPG). Stakes acetylated to 15% WPG did not give complete protection against soft rot. Stakes modified with alkenyl succinic anhydride showed increasing resistance to soft rot with WPG up to about 10% WPG, above which no further improvements were evident. Succinic anhydride and phthalic anhydride treated stakes showed little or no noticeable protection.
S C Forster, M D C Hale, G R Williams


Preventive action against fungal decay: A comparative experiment on the effects of natural and artificial infection of wood by Basidiomycetes
1981 - IRG/WP 2160
M Fougerousse


A short note on fungal decay in K33-treated poles
1982 - IRG/WP 1169
Soft rot cavities and erosion of the lumen have been found in K33-treated Pinus sylvestris poles from the years 1956-66 by microscopic studies. Poor treatment quality has been proved for some of these poles. The microscopy showed an unusual pattern of attack, and pre-treatment decay is suspected but not yet proved. Sounding the poles and using the Pilodyn indicated decay, but poking did not. Quantification of the attacks was possible only by microscopic studies.
H Friis-Hansen


Evaluation of the decay caused by Chaetomium globosum Kunze, in the course of time
1987 - IRG/WP 2288
The main research done on soft rot has been directed to determining, by microscopic study, the different stages of penetration into the wood of the fungi that cause it. On the basis of the information furnished by this research, in this work we have tried to quantify its effect, by evaluating the weight loss caused by Chaetomium globosum Kunce in wood of Pinus sylvestris L. and Fagus sylvatica L. in the course of time. The results obtained corroborate the existence of succesive stages of decay which is shown by large differences in the weight loss.
M T De Troya, A M Navarrete


Estimation of service life of durable timber species by accelerated decay test and fungal cellar test
2002 - IRG/WP 02-20249
Many kinds of durable wood species for outdoor uses has been imported from all over the world to Japan. However information on the natural durability of these species is not sufficient to estimate the service life of them in the climate of Japan. Highly durable species such as Jarrh, Teak, Ipe, Ekki, Selangan batu, Red wood, Western red cedar showed no significant percent mass losses by accelerated decay test according to the JIS Z2101, but some of them are degraded during fungal cellar test for 4 years . The decay rating (0:sound to 5:totally decayed) of them after 4 years exposure was 1.0, 2.0, 0.0, 1.0, 0.0, 2.3, 5.0 respectively. This results indicated that the conventional accelerated decay test could not evaluate the natural durability of these highly durable species at all. Solid wood specimens treated with boiling water at 120? for one hour are subjected to the same JIS test, and the obtained percent mass losses of these species are 1.2, 2.9, 1.9, 3.8, 4.7, 17.5, 0.0 % by a brown rot fungus, Fomitopsis palustris, and 17.5, 14.3, 3.3, 8.2, 4.2, 0.0, 18.3 % by a white rot fungus, Trametes versicolor respectively. Pre-treatment of solid wood specimens for removal of heartwood extractives before a accelerated decay test would be an effective way to evaluate the natural durability of highly durable species in a laboratory.
K Yamamoto, I Momohara


Use of fluorescent-coupled lectins as probes for studying fungal degradation of wood
1986 - IRG/WP 1288
The ability of the fluorescent-coupled lectins wheat germ agglutin (WGA) and Concanavalin A (Con A) to react with selected Basidiomycetes, Ascomycetes, and Fungi Imperfecti was evaluated using pure cultures of 35 fungi grown on malt extract agar. WGA, which binds specifically to the n-acetylglucosamine residues found in fungal chitin, reacted with nearly all hyaline fungal structures but did not react with dematiaceous (dark) structures. Several reasons are suggested for this variation. Con A, which is specific for a-D-mannosyl and a-D-glucosyl residues, reacted with about one half of the fungi that reacted with WGA. This variation in reactivity may be useful for studying simultaneous degradation by morphologically similar fungi having different lectin specificities. The results indicate that WGA is a useful probe for studying fungal degradation by non-dematiaceous fungi particularly at the early stages of decay.
J J Morrell, R L Krahmer, L C Lin


Copper based water-borne preservatives: The use of a thin section technique to compare the protection of wood by copper based preservatives against soft-rot and bacterial decay
1987 - IRG/WP 2286
This paper describes the techniques developed and gives examples of results obtained for the performance of copper based wood preservatives against both the bacterial and fungal hazards.
A M Wyles, D J Dickinson


Effect of felling time related to lunar calendar on the durability of wood and bamboo -Fungal degradation during above ground exposure test for 2 years- (Preliminary report)
2005 - IRG/WP 05-20311
Current study was carried out to know whether the felling time of trees and bamboos based on lunar calendar affects natural durability of felled wood-bamboo or not. Each of one sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) tree of 28 years old and one Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla) of around 3 years old was cut 12 times between February and December in 2003. Six sets of sugi tree and bamboo were felled in a day during “Hassen” period and the other 6 sets of them were also felled in a nearby non-“Hassen” day. There is a belief that “Hassen” should be avoided to perform destructive works such as cutting trees. “Hassen” lasting 12 days based on lunar calendar appears 6 times every year. After felling sample trees and bamboos, these specimens were subject to outdoor exposure at above ground level for 2 years. Properties of specimens such as moisture contents, mould and fungal resistance were examined periodically for 2 years. There was no clear difference in the degree of mould growth on the surface between specimens felled in a “Hassen” day and those felled in a non-“Hassen” day in the same month. The felling seasons, however, influenced the growth of mould on the surface of wood and bamboo clearly, which has been traditionally known in many cases. Fungal degradation evaluated by visual observation and the depth of pin penetration using Pilodyn during 2 years exposure was not affected by not only “Hassen” or non-“Hassen” also seasons when tree and bamboo felled.
K Yamamoto, S Uesugi, K Kawakami


Defining fungal decay types - Final proposal
1988 - IRG/WP 1355
The term soft rot is proposed for all forms of decay caused by Ascomycetes and non-basidiomyceteous Fungi imperfecti. The terms brown rot and white rot should be used only for decay caused by Basidiomycetes. Brown rot is characterized by extensive depolymerization of the cellulose and limited lignin degradation. White rot is characterised by significant degradation of the lignin component in wood.
T Nilsson


Flow charts for termite and decay tests to determine the natural durability of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don)
2008 - IRG/WP 08-20385
This paper deals with the experimental flow charts that were used for determination the effects of fungal decay and termite attack on Sugi heartwood during the course of the study of “Comparative studies of natural durability of Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don) among the geographic cultivate”, which was carried out by Usta et al (2006).
I Usta, S Doi


The leachability and specificity of the biological protection of timber using Scytalidium sp. and Trichoderma spp
1986 - IRG/WP 1302
The results of field experiments, using biological control against internal decay of creosoted poles, are briefly reviewed and the evidence concerning the leachability of the antibiotics produced by these species is presented. A pure culture miniblock decay test on biological control treated pine sapwood is described and the results compared to previously published data. The protection against Lentinus lepideus (Fr. ex Fr.) Fr. conferred on wood blocks by Scytalidium sp. and Trichoderma sp. was found to be completely removed by 24 hours Soxhlet leaching. Weight losses caused by Coniophora puteana (Schum ex Fr.) Karst were not reduced by prior colonisation of blocks with the potential biological control fungi. The significance of this finding is discussed in the light of the high frequency of isolation from poles of wood rotting basidiomycetes other than Lentinus lepideus and the latest results of a six year old field experiment.
P I Morris, N A Summers, D J Dickinson


The resistance of wood coated with different solvent-borne paints against colonisation by decay fungi
2009 - IRG/WP 09-40468
This paper examines different solvent-borne paints characteristics and their decay resistance when applied on pine wood surface. It was determined by the standard ENV 839 procedure. The part of samples were subjected to accelerated ageing according to the EN 84 standard. The discussed commercial paint systems were typical stains or penetrating oil-based products, with or without biocides.
B Mazela, P Hochmańska


Performance if internal remedial treatments to arrest fungal attack in poles and large timbers
2018 - IRG/WP 18-40834
Internal remedial treatments have been used to arrest internal fungal attack in utility poles and other large timbers. Water diffusible systems and volatile fumigants have both been used for this purpose. While both work, it is important to understand the performance attributes of each system. This paper reviews the literature on both systems and makes recommendations for future research.
J J Morrell


Comparison of decay rates of preservative-treated stakes in field and fungus cellar tests. Results after 40 months fungal cellar exposure
1983 - IRG/WP 2200
Decay rates of preservative-treated Pinus radiata stakes during 40 months exposure in the FRI fungus cellar were compared with those of similarly treated material in a field test. Decay rates in the fungus cellar were from 4 to 100 times higher than in the field, although for the majority of preservatives the rate was between 7 and 12 times higher. The lag phase before onset of decay, noticeable with most of the preservatives in the field test, was largely eliminated in the fungus cellar. Possible reasons are given for inconsistencies in relative rates of decay of preservatives in the two tests.
M E Hedley


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