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Fungicidal activity of some organic solvents, copper carboxylates and their complexes with 2-aminoethanol
1997 - IRG/WP 97-30136
We evaluated the activity of eight organic solvents against wood - rotting fungus Trametes versicolor in order to choose the most appropriate one for rapid screening tests of some copper(II) carboxylates and their adducts with 2-aminoethanol. Their activity against the selected fungus was classified in the following order: chloroform > N,N-dimethylformamide > acetonitrile > methanol > dimethyl sulfoxide > ethanol > acetone. The non-polar white spirit did not dissolve in the growth medium and the results could not be directly compared with the results for other solvents. As an appropriate solvent for screening of the tested copper(II) carboxylates, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was chosen. Minimal inhibitory concentration against Trametes versicolor of the screened carboxylates was in the concentration range of 1x10-4 to 1x10-3 mol/l. Coordinated amine ligands slightly, and not significantly, decreased fungicidal properties of the tested carboxylates.
M Petric, F Pohleven


Fungicidal properties of boron containing preservative Borosol 9
2004 - IRG/WP 04-30348
The fungicidal properties of new boron containing wood preservative Borosol 9 is described in this paper. These properties were of particular interest as this new boron containing preservative, exhibit very good performance against wood damaging insects. But because the tested boron formulation contain also nitrogen compounds, we wanted to verify if nitrogen as a nutrient could promote growth of wood rotting and blue stain fungi. Fungicidal activity of the boron based wood preservative Borosol 9 was evaluated according to the standard EN 113 procedure. Samples made of Norway spruce were brushed two times with 10% aqueous solution of Borosol 9, air dried, steam sterilized and exposed to the following wood rotting fungi: Coniophora puteana, Gloeophyllum trabeum and Lentinus lepideus. After 16 weeks of exposure the specimens were isolated and their mass losses were determined. After this respective period, the treated wood samples lost on an average less than 1 % of their initial mass. Parallel to this experiment, blue stain testing according to the EN 152-1 procedure was performed. Specimens brushed with Borosol were for six weeks exposed to blue stain fungi Aureobasidium pullulans and Sclerophoma pithyophila. After testing period the specimens were isolated and anti blue stain efficacy was determined visually. Both tests showed that Borosol 9 has fungicidal properties. Preservative, containing the boric acid - alkanolamine complex did not enhance fungal decay or growth. On the contrary, they showed high activity against wood decay and blue stain fungi.
G Babuder, M Petric, F Cadež, M Humar, F Pohleven


Fungicidal activity of some new water borne copper octanoate based formulations
1999 - IRG/WP 99-30198
Four new water borne formulations for preservation of wood were prepared: the composition of Cu(II) octanoate, 2-aminoethanol (ethanolamine) and water; the composition of complex of Cu(II) octanoate with nicotinamide, 2-aminoethanol and water; the one of Cu(II) octanoate, organic boron complex, 2-aminoethanol, dimethyl sulfoxide and water and finally, the mixture of Cu(II) octanoate, diazene, 2-aminoethanol and water. Fungicidal activity of these new formulations against Trametes versicolor, Antrodia vaillantii and Coniophora puteana was determined by filter paper and mini-block test methods. Compared to the commercially used wood preservative containing Cu(II) naphthenate / Cu(II) 2-ethylhexanoate, the new compositions have stronger fungicidal activity. The strongest biocidal activity was exhibited by the formulation with a Cu(II) octanoate/nicotinamide complex.
M Petric, M Pavlic, F Pohleven, P Segedin, B Kozlevcar, S Polanc, B Stefane, R Lenarsic


New boron-based biocides for the protection of wood
2002 - IRG/WP 02-30283
Boric acid and other simple inorganic oxides of boron are amongst the oldest wood preservatives currently in use. Their relatively low toxicity and broad-spectrum activity are just some of their desirable characteristics. The primary disadvantage associated with conventional boron-based preservatives is their lack of permanence in exposed applications. A collaborative project between CSIRO and the Centre for Green Chemistry is developing new complexes for wood protection based on boron. The approach involves the binding of boron with specifically designed ligands that interact with the wood constituents to reduce leaching. Accelerated weathering trials and cellulose paper bioassays have been used as a means of assessing the performance of large numbers of complexes, and building up qualitative structure-property and structure-activity relationships. The results obtained to date have been promising, with significant improvement in leach resistance and increased biological activity. This paper will discuss the approach adopted and the results obtained thus far. For reasons of confidentiality, some details of the complexes cannot be disclosed.
D G Humphrey, P J Duggan, E M Tyndall, J M Carr, L J Cookson


Diazenes and some organic complexes of boron as potential fungicides for preservation of wood
1999 - IRG/WP 99-30197
Screening for fungicidal activity represents the first step in searching for new active components with enhanced environmental profile in comparison with traditional wood preservatives. Diazenes, their salts, and the salts of the corresponding semicarbazides, as well as several complexes of boron, were screened for fungicidal activity against wood decay fungi Trametes versicolor, Coniophora puteana and Poria monticola. Activity was exhibited by two diazenes and two salts - tetrafluoroborates. Efficacy of both tetrafluoroborate derivatives was additionally confirmed by a mini-block test. In comparison with diazenes, substances from the group of boron complexes with 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds showed enhanced fungicidal activity.
M Petric, B Paradiz, J Stern, F Pohleven, S Polanc, B Stefane, R Lenarsic


Protection of hard and softwood through Neem leaves extracts and oil - A direction towards development of eco-friendly wood preservatives
2006 - IRG/WP 06-30394
Conventional wood preservatives like CCA and CCB are facing lot of criticism all over the world. It is essential to address the problem in view of environment protection. Eco-friendly wood preservatives may be considered as one option. The present study is an expolartion of neem leaves and seed oil against wood decaying fungi and termites. Azadirachta indica A. Juss, commonly known as neem is one of the most widely recognized and extensively studied plant specie of Indian sub-continent. Every part of the tree has been thoroughly evaluated for its marked activity against insects, microbes, pests etc. and has gain world-wide recognition as potential therapeutic agent. Neem is considered to be a store-house of various biologically active compounds such as azadirachtin, salanin, nimbin, quercetin etc. all of them are reported to possesses marked antifeedant, anti-microbial and anti-bacterial activity. The activity of alcoholic extract against wood decaying fungi i.e. Postia placenta and Trametes versicolor in hardwood i.e. Populus deltoides and softwood i.e. Pinus roxburghii at different concentrations revealed 4 to 7 fold protection of wood over to control. 80-82% protection was observed in samples of hard and softwood treated with leaves extracts when subjected against wood destroying termite i.e. Microcerotermes bessoni in laboratory. Neem oil at various concentrations protected hard and softwood efficiently against fungi i.e. upto 4 to7 fold over to control. Hard and softwood samples treatred with neem oil exhibited only 9-10% of weight loss by termites in laboratory whereas 95% damage was recorded in control samples. Present study shows that further work on neem oil and leaves extracts is required to develop potential eco-friendly wood preservative.
S Dhyani, S Tripathi


Synthesis of novelty borate compounds for wood preservatives: Laboratory test of leachability and decay resistance
2010 - IRG/WP 10-30520
A novel series of ammonium tetraphenylborate (ATB) and borate chemical compounds (BBC) were synthesized as wood preservatives. The leaching rates and decay resistance of boron formulations containing ATB and BBC were conducted. The laboratory leaching results showed that boron leaching rate of treated wood by ATB formulations was from 2.1% - 6.7%, while that of BBC formulations from 23.3% -59.0%. BBC could inhibit Gloeophyllum trabeum and Phanerochaete chrysosporium at all the concentrations by laboratory inhibition zone test. Mass loss of masson pine (Pinus massoniana), sapwood treated by BBC1 and BBC2 solutions were 1.4% - 2.6% (by Gloeophyllum trabeum) and 2.5% - 3.8% (by Coriolus versicolor) at the retention around 7.0kg/m3.
Zhiqiang Li, Mingliang Jiang, Xingxia Ma


Liquefaction - a functional way to manage CCB containing post-consumed wood?
2012 - IRG/WP 12-50288
The need for increased use of renewable resources put quite some attention to liquefaction of biomass, including wood. Several possible applications of liquefied wood as an alternative to petroleum based derivatives have been considered in recent years. In this paper, possibilities of wood liquefaction to manage post-consumed CCB (copper, chromium, boron) containing wood are considered, with a focus on investigations of fungicidal properties of liquefied wood with and without CCB. It was found out that liquefied CCB containing poplar and spruce wood did not exhibit sufficient protective efficacy against the following fungi: Trametes versicolor, Hypoxylon fragiforme, Gloeophyllum trabeum and Antrodia vaillantii. It is also believed that turning of liquefied wood with CCB into another products, such as adhesives, coatings or plastics, to extend service life of wood that had been protected by CCB, is most likely not an attractive solution. However, liquefaction could be interesting as the first step in detoxification of spent CCB (copper, chromium, boron) treated wood.
M Petrič, F Budija, D Hrastnik, M Humar, B Lesar


In vitro fungicidal activity of Tunisian essences extracts against Coriolus versicolor and Coniophora puteana
2014 - IRG/WP 14-20544
Bark of six Tunisian species including cork oak (Quercus suber L.), eucalyptus camaldulensis, alder (Alnus glutinosa), Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis), nut pine (Pinus pinea) and Chelfi pomegranates (Punica granatum) were tested against two rot-fungi: Coriolus Versicolor (for leafy trees) and Coniophora Puteana (for conifers) according to an adaptation of the European guidelines (NF EN 113, 1986). Five concentrations from 0 to 5 % (g bark sawdust per g culture medium) were tested for each species. Results showed that for the concentration range tested, no Coriolus Versicolor’s radial growth inhibition was observed in the presence of cork oak, eucalyptus camaldulensis and alder glutinosa. Besides, an antifungic activity was obtained in the presence of Aleppo pine and nut pine where Coniophora Puteana’s radial growths were about 87 % and 59% respectively at the end of the fungal essays. Comparing to other species tested, an important antifungic activity of pomegranate’s sawdust was obtained, where Coriolus Versicolor’s radial growth was only about 12% at a concentration of 5%. This activity is related to phenolic compounds concentration, where pomegranate barks are the richest in phenolic molecules in comparison with other species. This result is confirmed by the total polyphenols determination by Folin-Ciocalteu reagent of pomegranates barks extracted with hot water (260.86 ± 3.30 mg GAE/ g DW). HPLC-DAD analysis of the aqueous extract, allowed the characterization of polyphenolic molecules and it seems that punicalagin B, and ellagic acid, which are the major phenolic compounds (1.51 % and 6.59 % respectively), may have an important roles in antifungal properties. Chelfi Pomegranate barks can be considered as a potential raw material and its phenolic aqueous extract could be tested for wood preservation as a green alternative towards synthetic antifungic molecules.
L Lajnef, N Ayed, B Charrier


Preliminary study of the fungicidal and structural variability in copper naphthenates and naphthenic acids
1996 - IRG/WP 96-30114
Copper naphthenates, an oil-borne wood preservative listed by the American Wood-Preservers' Association (AWPA), is manufactured by complexing copper(II) with naphthenic acids. Prior to AWPA listing as a wood preservative, field experiments showed that copper naphthenates generally had good stability and were active against wood-destroying organisms. Recently, however, there have been reports of some copper naphthenate-treated poles rapidly failing. One possible explanation for the varying effectiveness could be that the structure, and resulting biological activity, of the naphthenic acids used to make copper naphthenate may vary. To test this hypothesis several naphthenic acids and copper naphenates were obtained and their fungicidal activity against three wood-destroying fungi measured. In addition, the chemical structure of the naphthenic acids were examined by proton- and carbon- NMR. Different activities were observed, especially against a copper-tolerant fungus. Some apparent correlations were seen between the fungicidal activity and chemical structures for the few samples studied.
T Schultz, D D Nicholas, L L Ingram Jr, T H Fisher


The evaluation of synergistic effects of chemicals on fungicidal efficacy in crossed-paper tests
1991 - IRG/WP 2383
The mixing effects of wood preservatives were evaluated using the crossed-paper technique. Two filter paper strips (0.7 x 8 cm²) were treated by soaking with different chemicals [fungicides, a termiticide (chlorpyrifos or phoxim), a surface-active agent, a synergistic agent, and a stabilizer], and placed at right angles to each other on a fully grown mycelial mat of a test fungus in a Petri dish. When the four organoiodine fungicides were incorporated with chlorpyrifos or surface active agent, only 3-iodo-2-propynyl butyl carbamate (IPBC) showed the desirable synergistic effect against every wood-decaying fungus tested. Other fungicides did not always tend to produce the synergistic effect with the addition of a surface active agent. 4-Chlorophenyl-3-iodopropargyl formal (IF-1000) appeared to indicate an undesirable antagonistic effect when mixed with either chlorpyrifos or a surface active agent. 3-Bromo-2, 3 diiodo-2-propenylethyl carbamate (EBIP) did not show any synergistic action by mixing with chlorpyrifos and/or a surface active agent, although the fungicidal enhancement was induced satisfactorily by mixing the fungicide with chlorpyrifos, a stabilizer and/or a synergistic agent, especially against Tyromyces palustris and Coriolus versicolor. Similarity of the results obtained in the present investigation and in the previous laboratory decay tests leads to the conclusion that the crossed-paper technique is suitable for the evaluation of the mixing effect of chemicals on fungicidal efficacy.
Dong-heub Lee, K Tsunoda, M Takahashi


Fungicidal combination products
1987 - IRG/WP 3426
Due to the increased pressure on some of the established fungicides used in wood preservation, possible alternative products become more interesting. The requirements for new chemicals are mainly lower toxicity and greater environmental acceptability. However the efficacy to target organisms should be as good as that of the currently used ones, preferably better. A possibility for progress in this direction could be fungicidal combination products showing broader spectrum of efficacy and synergistic effects. Mixtures of tributyltin compounds with Furmecyclox and K-HDO respectively are tested for this purpose. Toxic values with and without artificial ageing (wind-tunnel exposure and leaching) were determined. Investigations have been made with coating-formulations in order to test penetration, evaporation and the influence of UV-radiation. Aqueous formulations were tested for special purposes such as the treatment of freshly cut timber and the protection of brickwork. The results obtained are very promising, especially regarding long term durability. Further investigations mainly with the aqueous formulations including other test fungi and field trials are necessary to confirm the suggested application as wood preservatives.
H A B Landsiedel


Boron treatments for the preservation of wood - A review of efficacy data for fungi and termites
1994 - IRG/WP 94-30037
Boron treatments have been used for many decades for protection of timber from biological attack and also as a fire retardant treatment. In recent years there has been an increased interest in boron treatments as an option for protection of structural timbers' e.g. timber framing used in termite risk areas. This paper reviews efficacy data for both fungi and termites relevant to this end-use.
J A Drysdale


Temperature influence on the growing velocity and cellulolytic activities of Poria placenta strains from several locations
1986 - IRG/WP 2263
The differences observed on the FPRL 280 Poria Placenta strain at several Research European Laboratories for determining up the fungicide effectiveness of wood preservative has carry us to do a comparative study about the cellulolytic activity and growth velocity of each of this strains at different temperatures (22, 24 and 28°C). The results show significative differences when the temperature is changed.
A M Navarrete, M T De Troya


Changes in the degree of decay of lignocellulosic substrate used in a screening test of fungicidal wood preservatives
1977 - IRG/WP 287
This report contains results of investigations aimed at: a) determination of the effect of the kind of substrate and species of test fungus on quantitative changes in used samples prepared from spruce cardboard, and b) comparison of the threshold fungicidal values of come fungicides determined with accelerated method, with values obtained by block method. During performed investigations, the method described in Document No.: IRG/WP/262 was used. Assesment of decomposition degree was based on the loss of weight and amount of NaOH consumption by the substrate.
K Lutomski


Movement of boron from fused boron rods implanted in Southern pine, Douglas fir, red oak, and white oak timbers
1995 - IRG/WP 95-30061
This paper reports the distribution of boron from fused boron rods installed into six-inch (15.2 cm) square timbers of Douglas-fir, Southern Pine, red oak and white oak exposed aboveground. The composition and size of rods was: sodium borate and sodium borate-copper oxide (8.5 x 100 mm²); sodium borate-copper, sodium borate and boric oxide-copper oxide (12 x 76 mm²). The boric acid equivalent was roughly monitored by the curcumin/salicylic acid color test and the presence of copper was detected by the chrome azurol-S reagent. One year after installation of rods, movement of boron was determined by application of curcumin dye to increment cores removed at various distances from the site of boron rod installation. A portion of a sodium borate treated Southern Pine timber was also analyzed by spraying curcumin dye on sawed longitudinal and transverse sections. At 2 years, one foot sections were removed from all timber species, sawed as above, and boron and copper detection reagent sprayed on the sawed surfaces. Movement of copper from rods in all timbers was virtually nil. Both transverse and longitudinal movement of boron from rods was greatest in Southern pine which also had the highest moisture content. Movement of boron was next best in red oak. There was little movement of boron away from the rods in white oak and Douglas-fir.
T L Highley, L Ferge


Localization of oxalate decarboxylase in the brown-rot fungus Postia placenta
1996 - IRG/WP 96-10161
Oxalate decarboxylase, the enzyme that breaks oxalic acid down into formic acid and carbon dioxide, was recently detected in mycelial extracts of the brown-rot fungus Postia placenta. Differential centrifugation was used to demonstrate that the enzyme is loosely associated with the hyphal surface. Enzyme activity can be removed by washing the hyphae with a low pH buffer. Only low levels of activity were detected in soluble and membrane-bound intracellular fractions. The presence of the enzyme on the hyphal surface and possibly in the hyphal sheath supports the hypothesis that this brown-rot fungus actively regulates the pH and oxalic acid concentration of its environment.
J A Micales


Studies on the biological improvement of permeability in New Zealand grown Douglas fir
1983 - IRG/WP 3231
This report outlines progress towards optimizing conditions for water storage of New Zealand grown Douglas fir with the aim of improving permeability to water-borne preservatives, in particular CCA. Small scale laboratory tests are in progress but the need to scale up to potential commercial applications is being considered. Mixed populations of bacteria isolated from 10 week water sprinkled Douglas fir are being used to inoculate green, sterile timber. Environmental parameters such as pH, temperature and nutrient status are controlled to evaluate optimum conditions of growth, enzyme production and pitmembrane degradation leading to permeability improvement.
K J Archer


Differences in feeding activity among colonies of Formosan subterranean termite Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki
1983 - IRG/WP 1202
Feeding activities of 7 colonies of the Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, were examined. Wood-consumption rates among colonies differed significantly, ranging from 23.80-78.48 mg/g/day. This large intraspecific variation raised a question of whether differences in feeding activity reported for other termite species were due to interspecific differences. When rates were expressed as mg wood consumed by one g termite per day (mg/g/day), termites of larger body weight appeared to consume less wood. This negative correlation, however, was not significant when rates were expressed as mg wood consumed by an individual per day (mg/worker/day).
N-Y Su, J P La Fage


Fungicidal and termiticidal effectiveness of alkylammonium compounds
1983 - IRG/WP 3232
This paper is related to effectiveness of several AAC's against wood decay fungi and termites by Japanese standardized test methods.
K Tsunoda, K Nishimoto


Questionnaire for Volume 2 of the basidiomycete monographs
1985 - IRG/WP 1254
12 monographs of wood destroying basidiomycetes were published in volume 1. Volume 2 includes the following 17 basidiomycetes: Antrodia serialis, Chondrostereum purpureum, Climacocystic borealis, Fomitopsis pinicola, Hyphoderma tenue, Lentinus degener, Lentinus squarrulosus, Paxillus panuoides, Phellinus contiguus, Poria xantha, Pycnoporus sanguineus, Rigidoporus vitreus, Serpula himantoides, Sistotrema brinkmannii, Stereum sanguinolentum, Trametes corrugata
T Nilsson


Some tests on ES - AS 11, a novel anti-sapstain formulation, and its properties
1987 - IRG/WP 3399
The results of some tests with the formulation ES - AS 11 are given. The formulation is an attempt to improve the performance of an anti-sapstain chemical by: 1) increasing its penetrability 2) uniquely combining its active ingredients. Very short times of treatment (dipping not longer than 5 seconds), low concentrations of active ingredients, and lower toxicological and environmental risks may be a promising result.
U Straetmans


Antifungal activity of a stilbene glucoside from the bark of Picea glehnii
2001 - IRG/WP 01-10402
Stilbene glucosides are widely distributed as phenolic extractives in the bark of Picea glehnii, a commercially species planted in the northern area of Japan, and its content reaches to more than 10% by the dried weight of the bark. Although antifungal activities of these compounds have been reported, the mechanism of growth inhibition is still unclear. Isorhapontin (5,4'-dihydroxy-3'-methoxystilbene-3-ß-D-glucoside) is the major constituent of the stilbene glucosides in the bark of P. glehnii. In the present work, the relation between metabolism and antifungal activities of isorhapontin for the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium and the wood staining fungus Trichoderma viride was investigated. Inhibition of fungal growth was obviously depending on the conversion of isorhapontin to the aglycone isorhapontigenin (3'-methoxy-3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene) by ß-glucosidic activities in the cultures. Exogenous addition of ß-glucosidase also enhances the antifungal activity of isorhapontin. Moreover, less than 100 ppm addition of the stilbene aglycone isorhapontigenin is sufficient to inhibit the growth of both fungi. However, further metabolism of isorhapontigenin was observed after prolonged incubation of the fungi and resulted in detoxification.
S Shibutani, M Samejima


Feasibility of AE (Acoustic Emission) monitoring for the detection of the activities of wood-destroying insects
1992 - IRG/WP 92-2416
The feasibility of acoustic emission (AE) as a nondestructive testing method for the detection of the wood destroying insects was investigated. AEs were detected from the wood specimens under feeding attack of sugi bark borers or powder-post beetles. However, the feasible monitoring area of an AE sensor is influenced by the attenuation of AE amplitude, so that this could be a problem in the practical AE measurements, especially with wood specimens of higher moisture content.
Y Fujii, Y Imamura, E Shibata, M Noguchi


Amines – Promising Wood Preservatives
2002 - IRG/WP 02-30287
Environmental concerns require a new approach in the field of wood protection. Band of many traditional wood preservatives has lead to intense researches for new environmental-friendly wood preservatives. Amines seem to be promising substitutes for classical biocides. Fungicidal and leaching resistance as well as some other chemical analysis of beach and Norway spruce samples treated with ethanolamine, triethanolamine or ammonia was examined. Initially, percentage of fixed nitrogen in samples was established. Afterwards fungicidal resistance against Trametes versicolor and Gloeophyllum trabeum were determined according to the standard laboratory test EN 113. Finally, leaching resistance was performed according to the modified standard EN 1250 procedure. We found out that the mayor part of amines remained in wood and did not evaporate from it. The results indicated that amine treated wood increased resistance against wood decay fungi. On the other hand amine treated wood was not found suitable for use in hazard class 4, since amines were leached out of the wood.
M Humar, F Pohleven, Š Kesnar, P Kalan


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