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Progress report on co-operative research project on L-joint testing
1983 - IRG/WP 2192
A F Bravery, D J Dickinson, M Fougerousse


Wood preservatives: Field tests out of ground contact. Brief survey of principles and methodology
1976 - IRG/WP 269
This paper contains the following spots: 1.: The general need for field tests. 2.: Interests and limits of field tests in ground contact. 3.: Various methods in use for out-of-ground contact field tests. 4.: Fungal cellar tests are they an alternative to above-ground decay exposure tests? 5.: Conclusions....
M Fougerousse


Field tests out of ground contact in France: Definition of the test procedure and preliminary results after 18 months
1981 - IRG/WP 2161
M Fougerousse


Wood furfurylation process and properties of furfurylated wood
2004 - IRG/WP 04-40289
The first processes for “furfurylation” of wood (wood modification with furfuryl alcohol) were developed several decades ago. Furfuryl alcohol is a renewable chemical since it is derived from furfural, which is produced from hydrolysed biomass waste. Over the last decade modernised processes for furfurylation of wood have been developed. These new processes are based on new catalytic systems a...
M Westin, S Lande, M Schneider


Durability of pine modified by 9 different methods
2004 - IRG/WP 04-40288
The decay resistance was studied for pine modified by nine methods of wood modification: 1) Acetylation, 2) Treatment with methylated melamine resin (MMF), 3) Acetylation followed by post-treatment with MMF-resin, 4) Thermal modification, 5) Furfurylation, 6) Maleoylation (using water solution of MG or ethanol solution of maleic anhydride), 7) Succinylation, 8) NMA-modification and 9) modification...
M Westin, A O Rapp, T Nilsson


Short-term field test method with accelerated infection of Basidiomycetes in wood
1981 - IRG/WP 2155
In the ŠIPAD - IRC Wood Protection Laboratory an attempt has been made to develop a simple short-term method for field testing out-of-ground contact wood using accelerated infections with Basidiomycetes. This method makes it possible to obtain a preliminary assessment of a preservative's quality and to estimate the possibility of achieving promising results in more expensive long-term te...
N Vidovic


A new ground-contact wide-spectrum organic wood preservative: DNBP
1986 - IRG/WP 3358
A new organic wood preservative, which 25 years field tests have proved to be of efficiency and effectiveness comparable to CCA wood preservatives for ground-contact applications, is presented. Physical and chemical tests, supporting the long term field test results as well as indicating the characteristics of this preservative, are also presented....
W E Conradie, A Pizzi


A note on testing the efficacy of wood preservatives above ground
1995 - IRG/WP 95-20078
A number of test methods have been used to evaluate the performance of wood preservatives in above ground situations. These have included EN 113 tests following natural exposure weathering (NEWT), L-joint or T-joint tests, lap-joint tests, and decking tests. A new test referred to as the A-frame test has been developed and is under evaluation. This is based on a sandwich-type test in which a thin ...
G R Williams, J A Drysdale, R F Fox


The biological natural durability of timber in ground contact
1994 - IRG/WP 94-20051
The BRE ground contact field trials for the determination of the biological natural durability of different timber species have recently been reviewed. The data obtained from these trials have been used to appraise the different ways in which natural durability may be expressed. It is concluded that the use of the mean as a method of assigning the timber to one of five durability classes may be ac...
G A Smith, R J Orsler


Biological effectiveness of ground-contact wood preservatives as determined by field exposure stake tests
1984 - IRG/WP 3297
Field exposure tests conducted on stakes treated with different creosotes, mixtures of creosote and waxy oil as well as different CCA wood preservatives over a period of 25 years, gave the following results: The CCA preservatives provided excellent biological protection to treated stakes, especially against fungal attack. The CCA Type I, currently approved for use under South African conditions is...
W E Conradie, A Pizzi


Soft rot decay of 23 CCA-treated hardwoods from Sabah, Malaysia, in ground contact in Australia
1986 - IRG/WP 1280
The performance against soft rot decay of 23 CCA-treated hardwoods from Sabah, Malaysia, was examined after 20 months in ground contact at Pennant Hills, Australia. The results indicate that between these species soft rot decay is excluded by different levels of CCA salt suggesting that the threshold level for exclusion of soft rot in these hardwoods is a function of anatomical structure/ultrastru...
R S Johnstone


Performance of treated spruce in Canadian field test sites
1989 - IRG/WP 3506
Spruce material under test in Canadian field test sites is performing better than anticipated. From the comparison of the performance of spruce treated with various preservatives, it appears that penetration may be far more important on durability performance than the preservative itself or the retention of preservatives in the wood. However, there is still insufficient data on the influence of pe...
J P Hösli, E E Doyle


Field trials on preserved timber out of ground contact
1978 - IRG/WP 3154
This report describes two different field trials studying the performance of preservative treatments on timber exposed to the weather, but above the ground. Results are presented on the protection afforded against decay, and on the efficiency of water-repellent preservative treatments in controlling the uptake of moisture by the timber. Proposals for a standard field test system are briefly discus...
D F Purslow, N A Williams


Natural durability of wood in ground contact - A correlation between field and laboratory tests
1985 - IRG/WP 2182
A field test is being carried out to evaluate the natural durability of 20 hardwoods. The resistance to decay and termite attack was evaluated in accelerated laboratory tests. The results of the field test after 6 years and 8 months indicate that there is not necessarily agreement between results from laboratory and field tests. It is pointed out that apart from the artificiality of the laboratory...
M S Cavalcante, G A C Lopez, R G Montagna, M E S Fosco Mucci


Calculation of preformance index of Bardac 20 (an alkylammonium compound) evaluated in a field stake test
1982 - IRG/WP 3206
Bardac 20 treated stakes have been in test for three years at the Westham Island test site near Vancouver, B.C. The Performance Index for the preservative was calculated and found to be 0.009 which infers that, at the standard retention, Bardac 20 added 0.9 y to the life of the stake. It may be concluded that when tested using a standard field stake test using ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Laws)...
J N R Ruddick


A termite field test with diffusion treated lumber
1991 - IRG/WP 3648
Douglas fir lumber, diffusion treated with concentrated sodium octaborate solutions, was tested against Coptotermes formosanus in an above ground field test wherein the samples were not exposed to a direct leaching hazard during the test period. After 2.5 years exposure, the untreated control samples were almost completely destroyed while poorly treated controls pressure treated with chromated cop...
K J Archer, D A Fowlie, A F Preston, P J Walcheski


Natural progression of decay in unrestrained, Southern pine sapwood exposed above ground
1995 - IRG/WP 95-20060
In this study, the natural progression of decay is being monitored in 2.4-m (8-ft) lengths of dimension lumber. The 2.4-m lengths are supported without restraint in a horizontal plane approximately 0.75 m above ground in a partially shaded field plot in southern Mississippi. The lumber is 100% sapwood. Prior to installation in the field, each piece was planed to exactly 38 by 89 mm² (1.5 by 3.5 i...
R C De Groot, R J Ross, W Nelson


On the occurrence of Phialophora species in preservative treated wood in ground contact
1977 - IRG/WP 163
Phialophora is a fairly large genus comprising about thirty described species. They are widespread in very diverse environments, such as soil, sea water, wood and wood pulps. Some species are known as parasites on plants and animals, including man. Phialophora species were early known for their ability to produce blue stain in timber. Later it was discovered that several species were able to produ...
T Nilsson, B Henningsson


Collaborative field trial out-of-ground contact
1982 - IRG/WP 2179
At the 12th meeting of the IRG in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia it was decided after considerable discussion that the best way to proceed with the work of the subgroup was to centre it around a co-operative field trial based on the L-joint test detailed in IRG/WP/2157. At the same time it was agreed that interested laboratories would also conduct their own methods, particularly the German planner test and ...
D J Dickinson, A F Bravery, J K Carey


Performance of preservative-treated wood not in ground contact
1975 - IRG/WP 254
Experimental sash units of Pinus strobus L. and Pinus resinosa Ait. wood were removed from a test fence at Ottawa, Canada after outdoor exposure of over 20 years. The units were superficially treated, prior to painting, with preservatives containing either copper naphthenate, pentachlorophenol or a combination of zinc naphthenate and pentachlorophenol. Results indicated that all treatments were ef...
J K Shields, J Krzyzewski


A soil-less test of treated wood
1978 - IRG/WP 2105
The objective of this work is to devise an accelerated test for preservatives to be used in places away from soil contact. There may be compounds or mixtures which will protect wood or wood derived materials from decay in such articles as sash and doors, boardwalks, steps, laminated arches and the like, and possess properties that make them preferable to the heavy-duty preservatives used for poles...
E A Behr


The remaining concentration of inorganic wood preservative components in EN 252 stakes after ground contact
2000 - IRG/WP 00-50159
In order to determine the biological efficiency and the remaining concentration of different inorganic and organic active ingredients during service, EN 252 specimens were impregnated with 3 copper based wood preservatives. The stakes were installed in the test field of the DESOWAG GmbH, Rheinberg, for at least 7 years. At the end of the field test some of these stakes were divided into 10 uniform...
E Melcher, H-W Wegen


Pentachlorophenol and tributyltin oxide - the performance of treated Pinus radiata after 12 years' exposure
1986 - IRG/WP 3361
Pinus radiata samples were impregnated with a range of light organic solvent preservatives and copper/chrome/arsenic salt and exposed with no surface coating both in and above ground for 12 years. Inspection of the test samples revealed that some formulations of light organic solvent preservatives will give good fungal protection and reduce splitting in Pinus radiata exposed externally without a s...
R S Johnstone


Field Trials with mini-stakes
2002 - IRG/WP 02-20244
In 1995 an extensive field test program with wood mini-stakes, 8 x 20 x 200 mm, was started. In these trials a large number of parameters are being evaluated, including several new wood preservatives, differently chemically modified woods and natural durability of various wood species. The test sites are three fields in Sweden for in-ground and “close to ground” testing, one subterranean termi...
M Westin, A O Rapp, Y S Hadi, T Nilsson


A test method to simulate above-ground exposure
1978 - IRG/WP 2112
The simulated above-ground exposure technique described is worthy of consideration as a simple procedure to determine the relative decay resistance of preservative-treated wood exposed to a moderate decay hazard. The method may readily be modified to allow testing of other materials such as plywood by simply enlarging the slots cut in the modified feeder strips. The method by no means completely s...
J A Butcher


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