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Soft rot decay in acetylated wood. Chemical and anatomical changes in decayed wood
2002 - IRG/WP 02-40231
Acetylated Beech (Fagus sylvatica) and Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris) wood were studied in soil beds under laboratory conditions for longer periods. High mass losses and dynamic MOE losses were measured in non-acetylated wood and at lower weight percent gains (WPG). Rapid losses of lignin, holocellulose and ?-cellulose occurred in non-acetylated beech wood and no losses were detected at the highest WPG. Changes in chemical composition of acetylated beech wood at lower WPGs was measured. Slight changes in chemical composition of non-acetylated Scots pine wood were also observed and minor changes in acetylated wood at all WPGs; except in holocellulose. An intensive anatomical study was performed by light microscopy and SEM microscopy. The results are presented and discussed. Results showed a significant prevention of acetylation against fungal growth above 8 % and 10 % WPGs in beech and pine respectively.
B Mohebby, H Militz


Influence of CCA and TnBTO on wood decay, under different oxygen levels and various initial moisture content
2001 - IRG/WP 01-10415
Fagus sylvatica (beech) and Pinus sylvestris (Scots pine) were impregnated by TnBTO (tributyl-tin oxide) and CCA (chromated copper arsenate). In wood blocks two levels of moisture content (50% and 100% of saturation point) were used. Three levels of oxygen concentrations (10, 21, and 50%) were chosen. Treated and untreated wood were exposed to three fungi (C. versicolor a white rot, C. puteana, a brown rot, and C. globosum a soft rot). The results showed when TnBTO was used and wood samples exposed to C. versicolor between treated (TnBTO) and untreated specimens was no a big difference in weight losses. Using high moisture content (100%) in wood blocks caused very low weight losses in all treatments to be appeared. When CCA was applied decay by C. puteana was very decreased in Scots pine, therefore, there was a large difference in weight losses between treated and untreated wood. Low oxygen and high moisture content in treated samples caused wood decay by C. puteana did not occur. In the case of C. globosum effect, increasing the moisture content caused that wood decay in all specimens (treated and untreated) to be increased. However, low oxygen concentration in middle moisture content (50% SP) increased decay in beech.
S M Kazemi, R J Murphy, D J Dickinson


Effect of test site location on in-ground preservative performance after 6 years
2001 - IRG/WP 01-20231
Pinus radiata test stakes were treated with 4.1 kg/m3 of CCA and Fagus sylvatica with 6.1 kg/m3 of CCA. Both wood species were also treated with a copper plus triazole preservative (3 kg/m3 of copper) and chlorothalonil plus chlorpyriphos in oil (4.8 kg/m3 chlorothalonil). Furthermore, P. radiata was treated with ammoniacal copper plus a quaternary ammonium compound (2.6 kg/m3 copper) and a 60/40 mixture of high temperature creosote plus oil (61 kg/m3 creosote). Treated and untreated stakes were exposed in the ground at 13 sites in New Zealand and Australia for approximately 6 years. Preservative performance was significantly affected by site and there was a site-preservative interaction effect where decay hazard at a given site was dependent on preservative treatment. For pine, chlorothalonil plus chlorpyriphos, copper-azole and ACQ gave at least equivalent performance to the reference standards creosote and CCA, after approximately 6 years, at the majority of test sites. For beech, chlorothalonil plus chloropyriphos and copper-azole both gave superior protection to CCA, at the majority of test sites. In general, the results suggest that it is possible to select 3 - 4 sites that collectively pose a diverse decay hazard, representative of the majority of situations encountered by wood in service.
R N Wakeling


Hypoxylon species of the groups Papillata and Applanata on European beech in Serbia, Yugoslavia
1977 - IRG/WP 166
In the previous Document No: IRG/WP/165 under the title 'The most important characteristics of some species of the genus Hypoxylon found in Serbia, Yugoslavia', a contribution has been made regarding the importance of 4 species of this genus found in Serbia. In this paper the significance of the Hypoxylon species was emphasized in connection with their distribution and growth especially in European beech, having in view the fact that some of those appear primarily on recently felled timber of large dimensions. These species cause disintegration of the surface and in the deeper layers of wood. Among the species of the groups Papillata and Applanata there are species also of varying importance and this will be emphasized later in the paper.
M Petrovic


Protection of wood for above ground application through modification with a fatty acid modified N-methylol/paraffin formulation
2007 - IRG/WP 07-40378
Hydrophobic chemical modification can be regarded as an alternative approach to conventional wood preservation using biocides in order to protect wood in hazard class 3 according the European Standard EN 335-1. A formulation containing fatty acid modified N-methylol/paraffin and an aluminium salt catalyst was used to change the material properties of wood in order to protect wood from fungal decay and deterioration through weathering. Beech wood (Fagus sylvatica) treated to weight percent gains (WPG) of 10-14% resulted in significant decrease in water uptake in a submersion test of 40-50% when compared to that of untreated wood. The treatment slightly reduced the equilibrium moisture content at 60% and 90% relative humidity by 2% compared to untreated wood. An anti-swell efficient (ASE) of 26.6% was achieved at a WPG of 15.7% and indicated a moderate dimensional stabilisation. Strength properties of treated wood were not reduced by the treatment. In addition to the improvement of water related properties, the durability towards basidiomycetes was highly increased (tested according to EN113); the weight loss at 15% WPG was lower than 3%. Infection by the blue stain fungus Aureobasidium pullulans was significantly reduced in a laboratory test due to the treatment. Outside exposure over 1 year revealed less cracking and blue stain compared to untreated wood. The results of this study show that wood modified with a formulation of fatty acid modified N methylol/ paraffin was able to protect wood applied in hazard class 3 according to the European standard EN 335-1 over a long time period without the application of conventional biocidal products.
Nguyen Hong Minh, H Militz, C Mai


Adsorption of ionic liquids by Scots pine wood (Pinus sylvestris L.) and beech (Fagus sylvatica L.): equilibrium and kinetic modeling
2010 - IRG/WP 10-20447
In this paper methods for the adsorption study of quaternary ammonium-based ionic liquids on Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and beech (Fagus sylvatica L) are presented. Kinetic and equilibrium adsorption of compounds were evaluated. The equilibrium data fitted very well to the Langmuir adsorption models. The highest correlation coefficients determined from the pseudo-second order kinetic model confirm the key role of chemisorptions in the process of thickening of ionic liquids on the wood surface. The bonding identification of the ammonium nitrates into the Scots pine and beech wood was carried out using IR spectroscopy.
J Zabielska-Matejuk, A Stangierska, M Kot


The impact of catalyst on the properties of furfurylated beech wood
2016 - IRG/WP 16-40748
European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) is a major tree species of European forest that is underexploited because of its low dimensional stability and durability. Similarly to what has been developed with radiata pine, furfurylation might be the answer to optimize the utilization of local beech wood. Beech wood furfurylation process was studied using five different catalysts: maleic anhydride, maleic acid, citric acid, itaconic acid and tartaric acid. Optimization of the furfurylation process was investigated for different catalyst and furfuryl alcohol (FA) contents, and different duration of polymerization. The following properties were studied: weight percent gain (WPG), leachability, anti-swelling efficiency (ASE), wettability, modulus of elasticity (MOE), modulus of rupture (MOR), Brinell hardness (BH), and decay durability. Tartaric acid, never investigated up to now, was retained as catalyst to optimize the furfurylation process conditions due to its efficacy compared to other catalysts. Wood modification with FA and tartaric acid as catalyst led samples with high WPG even after leaching, improved ASE and lower wettability with water. Increasing the polymerization duration increased the fixation of FA in treated wood. Most of all, treatment gave a significant improvement in mechanical properties and resistance to wood decaying fungi.
P S Sejati, A Imbert, C Gérardin, S Dumarçay, E Fredon, E Masson, D Nandika, T Priadi, P Gérardin


Development of beech wood thermo-chemical modification treatments based on different vinylic derivatives of glycerol and polyglycerol
2019 - IRG/WP 19-40855
In this study, a combination between chemical and thermal wood modification has been investigated. Seven types of a low concentration of 10% aqueous additive solution of vinylicglycerol [glycerol-maleic anhydride (Gly-MA), glycidyl methacrylate (GM), and Glycerol methacrylate-maleic anhydride (GM/MA(2eq))], vinylicpolyglycerol [polyglycerol-maleic anhydride (PG-MA), polyglycerol methacrylate (PGM), and polyglycerol methacrylate-maleic anhydride (PGM/MA(3eq))], and maleic anhydride (MA) were impregnated into European beech wood (Fagus sylvatica), known for its low dimensional stability and poor natural durability. Varied with different curing temperatures at 103, 150, 200, and 220oC under inert condition, the modified wood and control were then characterized for their physical, mechanical, decay, and termite resistance properties. We found that, at the same initial weight percent gain (WPG) value (8 – 11%), mass changes (∆m) after thermal treatment, bulking (B), weight loss due to leaching (WLL), swelling (S), wettability, modulus of elasticity (MOE), and modulus of rupture (MOR) values of the additive-treated wood decreased as the curing temperature increased. In contrast, anti-swelling efficiency (ASE), decay resistance against Coriolus versicolor, and termite resistance against Reticulitermes flavipes values of additive-treated wood increased considerably for some treatments as the curing temperature increased, with better results at 200 and 220oC. In other words, the study has disclosed that the addition of some selected additives combined with thermal treatment can improve wood decay resistance and termite resistance better than untreated wood or wood with only thermally modified treatment.
M Mubarok, S Dumarcay, H Militz, K Candelier, M-F Thevenon, P Gerardin


Mechanical and biological durability properties against soft-rot and subterranean termite in the field (grave-yard test) of beech wood impregnated with different derivatives of glycerol or polyglycerol and maleic anhydride followed by thermal modification in an opened or in a closed system
2021 - IRG/WP 21-40917
This paper presents mechanical and biological durability properties in soil beg test (soft-rot test) and field test (grave-yard test) against subterranean termite of the wood modified with an aqueous vinylic derivative of glycerol/polyglycerol or maleic anhydride cured in an opened or in a closed system. Wood modification was performed through impregnation of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) with aqueous solution of polyglycerol maleate, glycerol maleate, or maleic anhydride at 10 or 20% w/w concentration, followed with curing under oven heating (OHT) at 120°C, 150°C, or 220°C in opened system or under heat pressurised steam (HPS) at 150°C in closed system. The modified woods were then characterized for their weight percent gain and mass losses after curing process, mechanical properties [modulus of elasticity (MOE), modulus of rupture (MOR), work to maximum load in bending (WMLB)], and biological durability properties against soft-rotting micro fungi in soil beg test and against subterranean termite (grave-yard test) in a tropical country. Results have revealed that almost all modified wood presented higher MOE values than untreated wood, however, MOR and WMLB decreased up to 27% and 87%, respectively. Biological durability in the soil beg test against soft-rot indicated that almost all modified wood were specified as durable to very durable wood. However, among the treatments, the wood modified with polyglycerol maleate/glycerol maleate/maleic anhydride at 20% under OHT 150°C or the wood modified at lower additive concentration (10%) under OHT 220°C presented significantly better durability against subterranean termite within a period of 328 days in the field.
M Mubarok, H Militz, S Dumarcay, I W Darmawan, Y S Hadi, P Gerardin


Collaborative soft rot tests: PRL tests of Cu/Cr/As preservative using method of Document No: IRG/WP/208
1973 - IRG/WP 223
These tests were undertaken as a preliminary to the next series of collaborative soft rot tests. An interim report has already been presented at Berlin in 1972 as Document No: IRG/WP/211
J K Carey, J G Savory


Performance of preservative-treated hardwoods with particular reference to soft rot. Report of condition of specimens installed in Victoria, Australia
1980 - IRG/WP 3155
J Beesley, R McCarthy


The most important characteristics of some species of the genus Hypoxylon found in Serbia, Yugoslavia
1977 - IRG/WP 165
M Petrovic


A method of isolating actinomycetes from decayed wood
1974 - IRG/WP 126
This paper deals with a tentative method of isolating Actinomycetes from dacayed wood.
T Haraguchi


Field tests out of ground contact in France: Definition of the test procedure and preliminary results after 18 months
1981 - IRG/WP 2161
M Fougerousse


Collaborative soft rot tests: Programme and test method
1973 - IRG/WP 229
J G Savory, J K Carey


IRG test of preservative-treated hardwoods with particular reference to soft rot. Report on condition of specimens installed in Victoria, Australia
1982 - IRG/WP 3207
J Beesley


Collaborative soft rot tests: Proposals for a standardized soil burial test
1971 - IRG/WP 201
A F Bravery


Collaborative soft rot tests: Interim report on PRL tests of Cu/Cr/As preservative using method of Document No: IRG/WP/208
1972 - IRG/WP 211
Preservative: Tanalith CT.106 - Results obtained with beech are given in the table and indicate a toxic limit of 16.7-19.2 kg/m³ - The initial soil moisture content was adjusted to 27.8% (the water holding capacity). Noticeable drying out has occurred in some of the test bottles.
J G Savory


A direct method for testing plywood and particle boards against fungal decay
1984 - IRG/WP 2214
A method directly inspired from the French standard testing method of the resistance of particle boards against fungal decay (AFNOR N° 51.295 May 1980) is described. But in that experimentation, the infestation is localized and realized in non sterile conditions. Small blocks of Fagus sylvatica (60 x 20 x 10 mm³) used as " inoculates " are infested with basidiomycetes, in Kolle flask for 4 to 6 weeks, then tightly pressed against the middle part of the test specimens (190 x 15 x 15 mm³). The lower part of the inoculates is plunged in vermiculite kept constantly humid by water containing a selective fungicide. After twelve weeks of exposure in non sterile conditions, in a green house with constant temperature around 20°C, the test specimens are then submitted to a static bending test until fracture. The comparison of the fracture-stress between control test specimens and the specimens exposed to wood rotting basidiomycetes permits to evaluate the resistance of the studied materials against fungal decay.
L N Trong


Collaborative experiments in testing the toxicity of wood preservatives to soft rot fungi
1970 - IRG/WP 25
Eight Institutes from seven countries, Austria, England, France, Germany, Holland, Sweden and Switzerland have collaborated in an attempt to assess the suitability of various laboratory test procedures for acceptance as standard methods of determining the toxicity of wood preservatives to the cellulose-attacking micro-fungi which cause 'soft rot' of wood. Pure culture methods with Chaetomium globosum have been tested together with soil burial methods in which the mixed fungus flora of unsterilised local soils has been used as inoculum. The results obtained with a copper/chrome/arsenate preservative have been presented and discussed. It is concluded that the information available is not yet adequate to permit definition of a reliable standard test method. The work has however demonstrated the unsuitability of Chaetomium globosum as a test organism in pure culture tests on softwood and has given indications that soils low in organic matter content may be most suitable for mixed culture tests.
J G Savory, A F Bravery


The effects of heat treament on the specific gravity of beech and spruce wood
2003 - IRG/WP 03-40254
The effects of heat treatment on specific gravity of beech (Fagus orientalis) and spruce wood (Picea orientalis) naturally grown and intensively used in forest products industry in Turkey were studied. The wood samples were cut into 2 x 2 x 3 cm. Heat treatment was than applied to the wood samples at four different temperatures (130 °C, 150 °C, 180 °C and 200 °C) and three different durations (2 h, 6 h and 10 h) under air atmospheres. The results indicated that the specific gravity values treated by heating generally exhibited a decrease with increasing the exposure durations and temperatures compared to the untreated wood samples.
S Yildiz, Ü C Yildiz, G Colakoglu, E D Gezer, A Temiz


Collaborative field experiment: Analysis of copper and chromium in stakes of the four reference timbers
1982 - IRG/WP 3213
The stakes analysed belong to the Swedish set of the four reference timbers of the collaborative field experiment (Document No: IRG/WP/367). Before the field exposure 60 mm were cut off the end of each stake. This was done in order to be able to carry out chemical analyses as well as different types of testing. Some of the material has been used in softrot tests (Document No: IRG/WP/1151).
T Nilsson


Proposed test procedure to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of a copper/chrome/arsenic preservative in seawater
1975 - IRG/WP 411
R A Eaton


IRG test of preservative-treated hardwoods with particular reference to soft rot. Report on condition of specimens installed in Victoria, Australia
1983 - IRG/WP 3269
G C Johnson, J D Thornton


Accelerated wood decay in a soil bed test under greenhouse conditions compared with a stake test under field condition
1991 - IRG/WP 2384
The rate of decay of oak, beech, Douglas fir, pine and spruce stakes in an outside test field were compared with the decay rate of the same species in a greenhouse soil-bed test. Strength loss after four and six months respectively was measured by determining the compression strength parallel to the grain. The results show that all species, strength loss in the greenhouse was 2 to 4 times higher than under field conditions. The rate of strength loss correlates with the rate of weight loss.
J E Polman, S G Michon, H Militz


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