IRG Documents Database and Compendium


Search and Download IRG Documents:



Between and , sort by


Displaying your search results

Your search resulted in 410 documents. Displaying 25 entries per page.


Contribution to study of the degradation caused in Pinus spp. poles used in field test
1989 - IRG/WP 1417
The study of the degradation produced by soil natural microflora on wood in contact with it in the field, has been going on for several years now. Our contribution to this aim in the present work has dealt with the possible relationship of the microorganisms in the soil. The microscopic visualization of wood colonization by the microorganisms, and the chemical analysis of the degraded wood compared with the undergraded.
M T De Troya, A Garcia, M J Pozuelo, A M Navarrete, A Cabanas


Biological degradation resistance of pine wood treated with dimethylol compounds
1989 - IRG/WP 3528
The study reports the increase of dimensional stability and biological degradation resistance of pine wood (Pinus sylvestris L) after impregnation with dimethyloldibydroxyethyleneurea. Decay resistance was determined according to BS 838:961. Nearly complete protection against Coniophora puteana, (Schum.ex Fr. Karst) weight loss of 2-3% was shown when modification, expressed as weight gain, exceeded 15%. Resistance to biological attack of modified wood is speculated to be due to modification of the wood components and cross linking with dimethyloldihydroxyethyleneurea.
C L Videlov


Chemical and biological studies of organotin treated and painted wood stakes after outdoor exposure
1987 - IRG/WP 3419
Organotin based wood preservatives containing tributyltin oxide (TBTO) or tributyltin naphthenate (TBTN) are used in Sweden mainly for double-vacuum treatments of window joinery of Pinus sylvestris. After impregnation the joinery is painted or stained in different colours. To evaluate this effect (different colours on the degree of degradation of TBTO and TBTN, effected by different temperatures in the wood), stakes of Pinus sylvestris sapwood were treated with TBTO or TBTN, painted in different colours and exposed outdoors out of ground contact.
M-L Edlund, B Henningsson


Correlation between changes in colour and chemical composition during photo-degradation of wood surfaces
2005 - IRG/WP 05-40301
Changes in colour of wood (yellowing) during photo degradation or weathering reflect chemical changes in wood. Therefore, the relationship between changes in chemical composition and CIELAB colour parameters is very important to characterize photodegradation of lignocellulosic surfaces. In this study, the changes in chemical composition and yellowing due to photo-degradation was studied by exposing wood surfaces of Pinus roxburghii (chir pine) to a xenon source. Changes in chemical composition were monitored by measuring IR and fluorescence spectra and were correlated with colour changes. A linear correlation between degradation of lignin and total colour change (E) was observed.
K K Pandey


Effects of alkali treatment on some mechanical and chemical properties of creosote treated oaks
1991 - IRG/WP 2366
To date, there is a lack of information on the effects of chemical treatment on the performance of creosote preservative treated oak sleepers. This factorial experiment was designed to analyze three main effects: species (Quercus alba and Quercus rubra) creosote treatment (treated and untreated), and alkali (NaOH) soaking (0, 1, and 10 percent). The modulus of elasticity (MOE) and fiber stress at proportional limit in compression perpendicular to grain, hardness modulus, surface hardness, alcohol-benzene extractives, hot-water extractives, 1% NaOH extractives, lignin, pentosans, holocellulose, and alpha-cellulose content were determined on specimens. The test results indicated that species, creosote treatment, and alkali soaking significantly affect both the mechanical and chemical properties of the oak sleepers.
P Chow, A J Reinschmidt, E J Barenberg, L C Chang


Study of the degradation caused by micro-organisms in Pinus sp. waterlogged wood
1989 - IRG/WP 1411
So far, the different Centers are trying the restoration and the conservation of wood structures, coming from subaquatic archeological deposits, with interest from the historic - artistic point of view. The main objective of this paper has been the determination of the decay level of Pinus sp. wood coming from a roman ship (approximately 2000 years old), where we have analyzed their physical properties, their chemical composition and the marine microorganisms (microfungi and bacteria) within.
M T De Troya, M C Escorial, J Garcia, A Cabanas


The influence of drying and chemical stress on the lignin degradation in aspen by Phanerochaete chrysosporium
1992 - IRG/WP 92-1573
Wood wafers of Populus tremuloides sapwood were incubated on common media with the white rot fungus Phanaerochaete chrysosporium (wild isolate) and subjected to cyclic drying or chemical agents (low levels of borate or trifluoperazine [a calmodulin antagonist]). After a mass loss of approximately 5.5%, wafers were dried and analyzed for acid-insoluble lignin. Those wafers containing chemical agents had statistically higher losses in lignin than controls or those subjected to a repeated drying cycle. These preliminary results suggest that it may be possible to increase lignin degradation of aspen by low level chemical treatments which do not prevent wood decay by this fungus.
E L Schmidt, Y-L Lin


Deterioration of wood viewed from iron nail
1991 - IRG/WP 2368
Deterioration of nail was graded by a five - rank numerical - rating. The rating of nail moisture content and decay of wood were inspected in a mortal-wall of 34-year-old house. The wood was mostly in decay, when the rating of the nail was above about 4, and the moisture content was above about 20%. Nailed wood specimens kept in several humidity room of 20°C for 4 years showed that the rating of the nail was about 3 in the wood with moisture content 20%. A curve of the rating of the nail against the service year was obtained from the inspection of 524 nails in the mortal-wall. This curve could be a standard life curve of the nail in mortal-wall in the central part of Japan. The curve obtained by connecting the points (4 years, rating 3) and (34 years, rating 4) may be a wood decay warning line in terms of high moisture content. Shear tests for deteriorated nailed joints showed that the load was expressed as function of the slip and the amount of the rust of the nail. The nail used for bevel siding wall is more likely to be influenced by the environmental factors. From the inspection of the nail, the northerly wind was found to be influential to the deterioration the nail in an area of Tokyo.
H Imamura


Chemical and biological investigations of double-vacuum treated windows after 5 years in service
1983 - IRG/WP 3219
In 1980 The Swedish Wood Preservation Institute initiated an investigation to study the degradation of TBTO and possible fungal attack in double-vacuum treated window joinery in service during 5 years. A hospital in Gothenburg was chosen that was built during 1969 to 1976. Both untreated and double-vacuum treated windows of Pinus sylvestris were used. A brown alkyl oil type paint (Nordsjö system Rubbol S) was used for the surface coating. The double-vacuum treatment was carried out with Vascol EWR 52A according to a specification that in 1977 became preservation class B, Swedish Standard SIS 05 61 10, viz. at least 10 mm penetration of the sapwood and a retention of approximately 50 kg/m³ sapwood (approx. 0.1% m/m TBTO). In April 1981 approximately 200 windows, treated and untreated, were inspected. From 12 treated windows, then about 6 years old and exposed to weathering for 4.5 to 5.5 years, samples were taken for chemical and biological analyses, the objective being to find out to what extent the TBTO had been degraded but also to get an idea what species of micro-organisms had invaded the wood and if the protection against decay was still sufficient.
J Jermer, M-L Edlund, B Henningsson, W Hintze, S V Ohlsson


Biological degradation resistance of wood acetylated with thioacetic acid
1983 - IRG/WP 3223
Chemically, modification of wood is being considered as an alternative to conventional preservation by toxic chemicals. Acetylated wood has been reported to be quite resistant to most biodegrading organisms at weight percent gains (WPG) around 15-19. The conventional acetylation techniques with acethic anhyrdride result in generation of acetic acid. However, acetylation with thioacetic acid overcomes this problem. Since different reagents may be reacting with hydroxyls located on different wood components, preliminary investigations on the resistance of wood acetylated with thioacetic acid were carried out. Tests against a brown rot fungus (Poria monticola) were carried out using soil block method with chir, a softwood. The wood exhibited good resistance to this fungus at WPG around 18. Resistance tests against a substerranean termite species Microcerotermes beesoni using forced feading method showed fairly good resistance at WPG around 13. Tests against softrot attack in a running cooling tower, however, did not show any resiastance upto a WPG of 14.
S Kumar, S C Agarwal


Chemical and biological investigations of double-vacuum treated windows after 7½ years in service
1985 - IRG/WP 3339
Earlier investigations of double-vacuum treated windows after five years in service have shown that tributyltin oxide (TBTO) degrades to di- and monobutyltin compounds and that the resistance of the wood against decay decreases. An investigation 2.5 years later of the same windows shows that the degradation of TBTO proceeds fast. After 7.5 years in service only 15-35% of the remaining organotin compounds consisted of TBTO. A clear correlation between the percentage of TBTO in the wood and decay resistance of the wood was found.
M-L Edlund, J Jermer, B Henningsson, W Hintze


Effect of fungal degradation on the chemical composition of acetylated beech wood
2003 - IRG/WP 03-40267
This study investigated the impact of fungal attack on the chemical composition of acetylated wood. Beech wood acetylated to different degrees was exposed to decay by the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor under solid-state fermentation conditions. Laboratory soil-bed assays were also conducted to study the degradation of acetylated wood by soft rot fungi and other soil-inhabiting microorganisms. Changes in the chemical composition of untreated wood and acetylated wood following exposure to fungal attack were examined by wet chemical analysis, as well as FT-IR and CP/MAS 13C-NMR spectral methods.
H Militz, Dong-won Son, L Gómez-Hernández, R Sierra-Alvarez


Micromorphological and chemical characteristics of waterlogged archaeological bamboos excavated from the Yellow Sea
2012 - IRG/WP 12-10785
Bamboos have widely used as documentation material in Far Eastern countries such China, Korea and Japan. In particular, bamboo slips as documentation material were extensively used even after the wide spread of paper in those countries. A large number of bamboo slips have been excavated from the shipwreck since 2009 in Korea. Understanding the cause of deterioration of ancient bamboos is crucial for developing technology of restoring artifacts of historical and cultural value. When compared to archaeological wood, it is very seldom to find the research work on the ancient bamboo artifacts. In particular, examinations on the waterlogged archaeological bamboo works are rare. The work presented is on bamboo slips which were excavated from a shipwreck. Various microscopical techniques and chemical methods were employed to characterize the waterlogged archaeological bamboos which had been submerged for more than 800 years in the ocean of Yellow Sea. Erosion bacteria were the most important degraders of waterlogged archaeological bamboo cell walls with occasional TEM images indicating presence also of bacterial tunneling. Chemical analyses showed that cellulose and hemicelluloses were extensively degraded with an indication that lignin was also degraded to some extent.
Mi Young Cha, Yoon Soo Kim


The iron reduction by chemical components of wood blocks decayed by wood rotting fungi
2021 - IRG/WP 21-10979
Brown-rot fungi, a group of wood rotting fungi, is well known to be one of major microorganisms that cause the deterioration of wooden buildings in Japan and have been considered to use chelator-mediated Fenton (CMF) reaction in concert with hydrolytic and redox enzymes for degradation of wood cell wall. CMF can be described as a non-enzymatic degradation system that utilizes hydroxyl radicals produced by the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with ferrous iron in the presence of chelator, and therefore, the reduction process of ferric iron present in wood cell walls is one of the key reactions in this process. To date, various candidates such as low-molecular weight aromatic metabolites produced by fungi, proteins, and lignolytic products have been proposed as iron-reducing compounds. In addition, lignin polymer has been also reported to have the ability of iron reduction although detailed mechanism is not still unknown. In the present study, the authors investigated the iron reduction with wood flour, which was expected to contain both a part of soluble compounds and cell wall polymers, using ferrozine assay in order to obtain the knowledge of iron reduction mechanism. We show that iron reduction capacity by decayed wood samples was higher than that by the samples of sound wood.
R R Kondo, Y Horikawa, K Ando, B Goodell, M Yoshida


Microbiological degradation of wooden piles in building foundations
1988 - IRG/WP 1370
White rot, soft rot and bacterial attack have been detected in softwood piles under buildings. In some cases bacteria were found to be the main degradation organisms in the studied piles. The water content of degraded piles was very high. The compression strength was quite low also in the piles deteriorated by bacteria. The density of wood was very variable, and the degree of degradation could not be evaluated according to density analyses.
L Paajanen, H Viitanen


Biological screening assays of wood samples treated with creosote plus chemical additives exposed to Limnoria tripunctata
1980 - IRG/WP 408
Laboratory methods for exposure of treated wood coupons to Limnoria tripunctata are described. Chemical additions to creosote were screened using this method. Three pesticides, Endrin, Kepone, and Malathion proved particularly effective. The addition of varying percentages of naphthalene to creosote using several treatment methods are currently being assayed. Results to date show that the coupons treated by the empty cell method have better performance than those prepared by the toluene dilution method. The naphthalene coupons treated by the full cell method show no attack after six months' exposure.
B R Richards, D A Webb


The effect of certain wood extractives on the growth of marine micro-organisms
1977 - IRG/WP 438
S E J Furtado, E B G Jones, J D Bultman


Fungal and bacterial attack of CCA-treated Pinus radiata timbers from a water-cooling tower
1991 - IRG/WP 1488
Transmission electron microscopy of decaying CCA-treated Pinus radiata timbers from an industrial water cooling tower showed presence of a thick biofilm covering some areas of the wood. The biofilm contained various morphologically distinct forms of microorganisms embedded in a slime. The study provided evidence of the activity of soft rot fungi and tunnelling and erosion bacteria in wood cells. The extent of damage to wood cells due to microbial activity varied, combined fungal and bacterial attack having the most damaging impact.
A P Singh, M E Hedley, D R Page, C S Han, K Atisongkroh


Results of chemical analyses in the field of wood preservation in the Bundesanstalt für Materialprüfung
1973 - IRG/WP 321
The results of qualitative and quantitative chemical analyses of wood preservatives are often the basis for evaluating the various works in the field of wood preservation. In the past 10 to 15 years a number of such works was carried out in the Bundesanstalt fur Materialprüfung, Berlin-Dahlem, dealing with the identification and effectiveness of wood preservatives and with methods of wood preservation. Fundamental realisations were made which will be summarised below. It seems advisable to differentiate between inorganic and organic chemical wood preservatives and methods of analyses. These are two distinct fields which differ also with regard to the analytical techniques applied.
H J Petrowitz


The decay resistance of chemically modified aspen composites to the white rot fungus Coriolus versicolor (L.) Quelet
1998 - IRG/WP 98-40122
Chemical modification of Aspen wood (Populus tremula L.) in the form of solid wood, veneers and sawdust was undertaken by a two step procedure consisting of esterification with maleic anhydride (MA) and subsequent oligoesterification with MA and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) or allyl glycidyl ether (AGE). Modified wood was thermoplastic and was thermally formed by hot-pressing to produce veneer or solid wood samples with smooth glossy surfaces, while plastic-like wafers were obtained by hotpressing modified sawdust. Chemical modification alone was shown to enhance the biological resistance of Aspen to decay by Coriolus versicolor. In addition, hot-pressing enhanced decay resistance of both unmodified wood and esterified wood veneer samples, although no improvement was found by hot pressing oligoesterified wood. The most effective treatment for the improvement of decay resistance was chemical modification of the sawdust in conjunction with hot-pressing. A microscopic examination of chemically modified and control samples following exposure to the fungus showed more extensive colonisation and decay in untreated, unpressed samples.
M C Timar, A J Pitman, M D Mihai


Effect of medium-term degradation of beech wood by erosive (Phanerochaete chrysosporium) and lignin-selective (Ceriporiopsis subvermispora) strains of white rot fungi on its selected physical properties
2004 - IRG/WP 04-40292
At the Faculty of Wood Sciences and Technology a fungal delignification of normal and tension beech wood by erosive and lignin-selective strains white-rot fungi has been studied. The pre-treatment of both kind of wood samples was accompanied by partial delignification and apparent changes of their physical properties influencing the polar liquids penetration.
R Solár, S Kurjatko, M Mamonová, J Hudec


Protocol for evaluation and approving new wood preservative
1985 - IRG/WP 2159
M E Hedley, J A Butcher


Di-sodium fluorophosphate, a new fluorine containing, water-borne wood preservative
1986 - IRG/WP 3373
The physical, chemical properties of Di-sodiumfluorophosphate (Na2PO3F) are compared with those of a trade-mark SF-salt. The opposition of biological activity and toxicological data showed that Di-sodiumfluorophosphate may be a suitable alternative to SF-salts ( based on MgSiF6).
D Seepe, W Metzner


Ultra-structural observations on the degradation of wood surfaces during weathering
1987 - IRG/WP 2280
Radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) sapwood was converted into blocks with a transverse face about 5 mm square and measuring 8 mm longitudinally. Transverse (T.S.), Radial (R.L.S.) and Tangential (T.L.S.) surfaces were prepared and specimens exposed to the weather inclined at 45° facing equatorially for periods of between 20-60 days. After 30 days exposure erosion of the middle lamella was observed followed after 40 days exposure by extensive separation of individual fibres at the interface of the middle lamella and secondary wall. Degradation of the S2 layer of the cell wall revealed corrugations orientated parallel to the fibre axis suggesting preferential removal of cell wall components. Further degradation proceeded by progressive delamination and checking of the S2 and erosion of the S3 cell wall layer. In addition to the above changes preferential degradation of the rays was observed in radial (R.L.S.) and tangential (T.L.S.) longitudinal surfaces.
P D Evans, S Thein


Resistance of Alstonia scholaris vestures to degradation by tunnelling bacteria
1992 - IRG/WP 92-1547
Electron microscopic examination of vessels and fibre-tracheids in the wood of Alstonia scholaris exposed to tunnelling bacteria (TB) in a liquid culture showed degradation of all areas of the secondary wall. The highly lignified middle lamella was also degraded in advanced stages of TB attack. However, vestured pit membranes and vestures appeared to be resistant to degradation by TB even when other wall areas in Alstonia scholaris wood cells were severely degraded. The size comparison indicated vestures to be considerably smaller than TB, and we suspect that this may primarily be the reason why vestures in Alstonia scholaris wood were found to be resistant to degradation by TB.
A P Singh, T Nilsson, G F Daniel


Next Page