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Evaluation of new creosote formulations after extended exposures in fungal cellar tests and field plot tests
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30228
Although creosote, or coal tar creosote, has been the choice of preservative treatment for the railroad industry since the 1920s, exuding or "bleeding" on the surface of creosote-treated products has been one incentive for further enhancements in creosote production and utility (Crawford et al., 2000). To minimize this exuding problem, laboratories such as Koppers Industries Inc., USA, and Commonw...
D M Crawford, P K Lebow, R C De Groot


Further progress towards a cleaner creosote treatment - Summarised report
1984 - IRG/WP 3304
This document provides an up-dated progress report on our development of pigment emulsified creosote (PEC) used as a cleaner alternative to conventional high temperature creosote. A range of commodities (both hardwood and softwood) has now been satisfactorily treated in pilot plant and full scale commercial operations. Both brown (PEC 30B) and white (PEC 30W) formulations have been used. In additi...
H Greaves, C-W Chin, J B Watkins


Clean creosote - its development, and comparison with conventional high temperature creosote
1983 - IRG/WP 3235
Pigment emulsified creosote (PEC) is presently being tested and shows considerable stability in terms of water content, pigment level, pH, viscosity, rheological behaviour and microscopy. Timber samples from several eucalypt species have been treated with PEC and side matched samples treated with conventional high temperature creosote (HTC). The PEC treated specimens showed higher weight retention...
C W Chin, J B Watkins, H Greaves


Biosorption of metals for wood waste effluent clean up
1997 - IRG/WP 97-50090
The common filamentous fungi can sorb metal ions from aqueous solutions. The biosorption of metal ions like copper Cu2+, chromium Cr6+ and arsenic As5+ by dead fungal mycelia was investigated. Two industrial fermentation byproducts are tested: Mucor miehei and Aspergillus oryzae. The adsorption of metal ions depends on parameters such as chemical treatment of fungi before biosorption (acid or basi...
S Legay, G Labat