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A method for screening termite baits using Coptotermes lacteus mounds
1984 - IRG/WP 1237
A method with several variations designed to rapidly screen potential bait substrates using Coptotermes lacteus mounds is described. The equipment used in this method is relatively inexpensive, readily prepared in the laboratory, and easily installed into active mounds in the field. Bait substrates are in continuous contact with a 'high termite hazard', and may be monitored with ...
J R J French, P J Robinson


What can DNA fingerprinting, aggression tests and morphometry contribute to the identification of colonies of the Formosan subterranean termite
2000 - IRG/WP 00-10371
Multilocus DNA fingerprinting, aggression tests and morphometry were compared to evaluate their potential for the identification of colonies of the Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) in Hawaii. DNA fingerprinting separates the termites from all studied collection sites. Since the genetic similarity between termites from different collection sites lies...
C Husseneder, J K Grace


Sequential exposure of borate treated Douglas-fir to multiple Formosan subterranean termite colonies in a 40-week field test
1993 - IRG/WP 93-10006
Douglas-fir boards (ca. 74.5 g) pressure-treated with disodium octaborate tetrahydrate (DOT) retentions of 0 (controls), 0.88, 1.23, 1.60, or 2.10% (weight/weight) DOT were sequentially exposed to four active field colonies of Formosan subterranean termites, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae), in an above-ground field test. Samples were placed in contact with each colony fo...
J K Grace, R T Yamamoto


Differences in feeding activity among colonies of Formosan subterranean termite Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki
1983 - IRG/WP 1202
Feeding activities of 7 colonies of the Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, were examined. Wood-consumption rates among colonies differed significantly, ranging from 23.80-78.48 mg/g/day. This large intraspecific variation raised a question of whether differences in feeding activity reported for other termite species were due to interspecific differences. When rates were...
N-Y Su, J P La Fage


Implications for comparability of laboratory experiments revealed in studies on the variability in survival and wood consumption between colonies of Coptotermes acinaciformis (Froggatt) (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae
1983 - IRG/WP 1196
(Summary of paper 1193) Groups of Coptotermes acinaciformis, originating from six colonies, three taken from each of two localities, 1500 km apart, in northern Australia (Townsville, Darwin) were kept at population densities of 0.005, 0.01 and 0.02 g termites/mL. Survival and wood consumption of the groups after 8 weeks followed a similar pattern in the colonies from both collection areas. Groups were least vigorous at the lowest population density; their performance reached a maximum at a population density of 0.01 g/mL. The subsequent decline in vigour was less marked as the highest population density was approached. However, the actual values for survival and wood consumption varied widely between colonies, irrespective of their origin. It is recommended that in all laboratory experiments which use survival and wood consumption as indicators of termite vigour, controls of a favourable as well as an unfavourable food type are included which would serve to monitor the vigour of the termites. Results from termite sources whose vigour falls below a certain threshold value would have to be treated with caution and could not be used in definative data, as e.g. in defining critical retentions of wood preservatives.
M Lenz


Yeasts associated with the infrabuccal pocket and colonies of the carpenter ant Camponotus vicinus
2000 - IRG/WP 00-10335
Yeast associations in three colonies of Camponotus vicinus were examined in two different areas of western Oregon. We sampled the exo-cuticle, infrabuccal pocket contents of worker ants, interior galleries of each colony and detritus and soil in the area adjacent to the nest. Samples were plated on yeast-extract-malt-extract agar augmented with 1M hydrochloric acid and incubated at 25°C. Yeasts w...
M E Mankowski, J J Morrell


Field test results for the elimination of subterranean termite (Coptotermes formosanus) colonies by a bait system containing the IGR hexaflumuron
1997 - IRG/WP 97-10222
Field studies were conducted at Chichijima (Ogasawara Islands, Tokyo) to determine the effectiveness of a termite bait system (commercial name: Sentricon* system) containing hexaflumuron (Insect Growth Regulator: IGR) in the elimination of subterranean termite (Coptotermes formosanus) colonies. The level of subterranean termite activity on Ogasawara Islands is high resulting in extensive damage to...
K Suzuki, Y Morita, K Yamauchi


How predictive are laboratory experiments for assessing the effects of chitin synthesis inhibitors (CSI) on field colonies of terrnites? - A comparison of laboratory and field data from Australian mound-building species of termit
1996 - IRG/WP 96-10143
A singular advantage of using mound building species of termite is their directly accessible nest. This allows evaluation of control methods by accurate assessment of the effects at the colony level. The mound building species Coptotermes acinaciformis (Froggatt) and Nasutitermes exitiosus (Hill) were used to test the CSI, hexaflumuron, in laboratory and field trials. Laboratory results showed tha...
M Lenz, P V Gleeson, L R Miller, H M Abbey


Estimation of oral toxicity of boron as a bait toxicant and the trophallactic effects between individual members of termite colonies.
2003 - IRG/WP 03-10495
In recent years, because of the favourable environmental characteristics of boron, researchers in the wood preservation industries have refocussed on the use of boron as a major wood preservative against wood-destroying insects. Currently the greatest use of boron compounds is in remedial treatments. Boron has been found to have slow-acting toxicity against subterranean termites. Because of thi...
B M Ahmed


Intraspecific variability in feeding capacity of Coptotermes acinaciformis (Froggatt) (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae)
1983 - IRG/WP 1175
This paper describes laboratory studies to evaluate the comparative feeding capacity within and between five mound colonies of Coptotermes acinaciformis (Froggatt). Matched specimens of mountain ash, pine and coachwood were exposed to five replicate 10 g groups of termites from each colony source. After an initial 8-week exposure period, all groups were assessed for vitality and continued feeding ...
C D Howick, J W Creffield


Implications for comparibility of laboratory experiments revealed in studies on the variability in survival and wood consumption between colonies of Coptotermes acinaciformis (Froggatt) (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae
1983 - IRG/WP 1193
Groups of Coptotermes acinaciformis originating from six colonies, three taken from each of two localities 1500 km apart in northern Australia (Townsville, Darwin), were kept at population densities of 0.005, 0.011 and 0.02 g termites/mL. Survival and wood consumption of the groups after 8 weeks followed a similar pattern in the colonies from both collection areas. Groups were least vigorous at th...
M Lenz


Intrigue Dust - A new method of eradicating subterranean termite (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) colonies
2001 - IRG/WP 01-10396
Arsenic trioxide is used by pest controllers in Australia to eradicate subterranean termite colonies. In 2000 Bayer Australia introduced Intrigue Termite Dust as a more environmentally acceptable alternative. Intrigue, containing 80% triflumuron, a chitin synthesis inhibitor, disrupts the moulting process in termites. Dusted termites return to the nest and pass around triflumuron via mutual groomi...
W Madden


Comparison of various types of bait containers designed to aggregate large numbers of foraging subterranean termites from natural populations in below-ground mound colonies
1995 - IRG/WP 95-10116
At Walpeup in the semi-arid mallee country of north-west Victoria (350 km from Melbourne), there are several indigenous subterranean termite species, none of which build above-ground mound colonies but build their colonies below-ground and/or in trees. This paper describes a baiting experiment in which three types of bait containers were compared in their ability to aggregate large numbers of fora...
J R J French, B M Ahmed


The gaseous environment of Coptotermes lacteus mound colonies before and after mirex treatment
1989 - IRG/WP 1396
While monitoring the halocarbon and hydrocarbon emissions from a dry sclerophyll eucalypt forest in central Gippsland, similar emissions were collected from within several Coptotermes lacteus mound colonies. Samples of the gases (hydrocarbons) from within the mounds were collected before, during and after treatment with mirex-treated wood-decay blocks. All the mirex-treated mounds died within two ...
J R J French, R A Rasmussen, D M Ewart, M A K Khalil


The development of a field testing technique using Coptotermes lacteus mounds in Australia
1985 - IRG/WP 1270
A method to rapidly screen potential bait substrates placed around Coptotermes lacteus mounds is described. A perforated P.V.C. conduit is buried in a shallow trench in a rectangular arrangement around an active mound. Seven P.V.C. holders containing cork baits are inserted vertically into the conduit around the mound. Within three weeks following installation of the baits around five mound coloni...
J R J French, P J Robinson


Estimating the size of subterranean termite colonies by a release-recapture technique
1980 - IRG/WP 1112
The technique is described and the results of an exploratory field trial are presented. The colony size estimate from weekly termite collections varied considerably, but nevertheless permitted assigning termites at three locations to three categories of greatly different colony size. The sizes of the three estimates were much greater than anticipated and included a multimillion termite complex of ...
G R Esenther


The “wire-loop slicing technique” for the rapid field collection of large numbers of Coptotermes acinaciformis termites from above-ground mound colonies
2006 - IRG/WP 06-10583
This technique of rapidly slicing through an above-ground C. acinaciformis mound colony with a steel wire-loop attached to a vehicle allows the collection of large numbers of termites. The sliced mound topples onto a tarpaulin arranged on the ground, the outer wall layers break away in large segments, and the carton materials incorporating the termites are readily collected and transferred to larg...
B M Ahmed, J R J French


Elimination of colonies belonging to higher termite group using insecticide bait: A short review
2018 - IRG/WP 18-10908
Controlling termite infestation by using baiting method is gaining popularity around the world. Lower group of termites particularly belonging to the genus Coptotermes have proven to be easy to control by this method due to their nature of feeding. However termites belonging to higher group, such as those under Termitidae were initially thought to be a challenge as they mostly fed on fungal garden...
P Dhang