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Status of the research and development of a new preservative system (EFPL) for pressure treatment of spruce in Canada
1975 - IRG/WP 348
Our work has been to develop a system which would have the stability of the ACA system and the formulation flexibility of the CCA system enabling properties such as fixation of arsenic, water repellency, appearance and cost to be controlled. Our permeability studies of spruce using a method previously developed indicated that an ammoniacal solution of copper arsenate is an excellent candidate for the treatment of spruce. Studies of the permeability of spruce sapwood microsections to CCA preservative and to an ammoniacal solution of copper arsenate proved that the ammoniacal system penetrates 1.7 to 1.8 times faster than the CCA system, in the radial direction. The permeability in the tangential direction was on the average 3.8 times better. These results were confirmed by pressure treatments of spruce lumber and spruce roundwood with both preservatives.
J Rak, M R Clarke


The applicability of life cyle analysis and alternative methods in the wood preservation industry
1994 - IRG/WP 94-50023
In the Netherlands, several case studies have been performed using the life cycle analysis method (LCA). This type of research is aimed at an inventory and classification (sometimes including also evaluation) of the environmental impacts of a product, from the raw material to waste stage ("cradle to grave" approach). In a LCA each environmental impact is assessed in terms of, for example, mass of raw material use (kg), energy consumption (MJ), emissions (COx, NOX, SOx, etc.) and final waste (in kg). The critical point in an LCA is the definition of comparable "functional units" for similar products made of different materials with different service lifes. As the LCA method has often proved to be very complex, lime-consuming, expensive and difficult to interpret and translate into practically usefull results, alternative methods are developed. Three methods are described and compared on the basis of various examples. It is hoped that this may be of use as a starting point for further discussion on the suitability of applying the LCA on (preservative treated) timber products.
P Esser, J Cramer


Summary of development of pile wrappings in Los Angeles Harbour
1987 - IRG/WP 4141
G Horeczko


Thermal treatment of wood: European Processes and their background
2002 - IRG/WP 02-40241
Recent efforts on thermal treatment of wood lead to the development of several processes introduced to the European market during the last few years. The total production capacity of heat treated wood in 2001 is estimated as approx. 165.000 m3. In the paper the different heat processes are presented. The general technology as well as scientific data on the chemical transformation of the cell wall polymers, on the biological performance, on the physical and mechanical properties of the treated wood are presented and discussed
H Militz


Scientific development for prolonging the service life of timbers by impregnating with creosote or organic solvent type preservatives in which additive has been incorporated
1977 - IRG/WP 382
Chemically impregnated wood has played a prominent part in the Telephone and Electricity Distribution Industry during the past century and there is no doubt that it will play an equally prominent part in the future. The reasons why wood poles and wooden, structures predominate, are that when adequately chemically impregnated with a recognised timber preservative to ensure the expected service life for the purpose envisaged, the timber is then fully protected against the ravages of wood destructive organisms. Furthermore, wood is endowed with many natural characteristics that make it a favourite pole and structural material. Its high strength, light weight, ability to absorb impact or shock from loads suddenly applied and ability to resist overloading for brief periods plus its well-known insulating qualities - all are important basic reasons for its predominance in pole line structure. The use of chemically impregnated timber often makes it possible to carry out a given construction programme at less cost, or to erect more structures for a given sum of money, than when more expensive construction materials are employed.
P R B D De Bruin


Preliminary attempts towards the development of a small scale termite rearing chamber. Progress report
1983 - IRG/WP 1203
The results suggest that there is no evidence that the volume of the rearing chamber plays a part in the settlement of a colony. These rearing chambers present a factor of productivity (final enumeration)/(initial enumeration) of roughly 2 after one year. 90% of the colony survived. This method of breeding can be considered as feasible and cheap.
M Argoud, J C Palla, R Sternalsky


Development of marine borers research in Sao Paulo State, Brazil
1985 - IRG/WP 4117
This paper describes some field tests which have been carried on marine sites in Sao Paulo State mainly to investigate the natural resistance of Brazilian woods and the occurrence of marine borers. Some laboratory breeding tests which are being developed are also describe
G A C Lopez


Development of a Granitgard® particulate termite barrier for use in tropical Australia
1997 - IRG/WP 97-10190
Granitgard® is superficially simple technology; graded crushed aggregate, sieved to a size range impenetrable to subterranean termites. However, behind this apparent simplicity lies a large research effort. In this paper we describe the laboratory development of a grading of Granitgard suitable for use against the wide range of termites which attack timber in northern Australia, above the Tropic of Capricorn.
D M Ewart, E R Rawlinson, A D Tolsma, G C Irvin, P R Wiggins


Comparative evaluation of the barrier effect against Hylotrupes bajulus L. of different types of wood preservative
1986 - IRG/WP 1307
This paper settles the difference of contact action against females of Hylotrupes bajulus the likelihood of egg-laying, the ovicide effect and the hazards of development of newly hatched larvae between some preservatives belonging to three differents types: mineral waterborne products, organic products and emulsions. The results show that against females, the action is fast with organic products, slower with emulsions and non existent with mineral products. They point out the relation between the longivity of females and the eventuality of egg-laying. With ageing, this latter become possible for almost every preservative. In the most of cases, the larvae hatch from eggs and can bore into wood until they accumulate the lethal dosis and that occurs more or less fastly. A few differences are observed for preservatives of the same category.
M-M Serment


Development of novel techniques for evaluating the feeding rate of Limnoria lignorum with specific reference to temperature influences
1999 - IRG/WP 99-10325
The faecal pellet production of Limnoria lignorum placed into repli-dish chambers containing seawater and a small chip of untreated Corsican pine (Pinus nigra) was observed. The repli-dishes were kept at a range of constant temperatures between 10 and 25°C and the number of faecal pellets produced by each of the animals was monitored. It was found that faecal pellet length generally increased with gut length and that temperature had no effect on the faecal pellet length. There was considerable variation in faecal pellet production rates, both from day to day for any particular animal and from animal to animal. Faecal pellet production rate was generally highest between 15 and 21°C and decreased above 22°C. The production of faecal pellets tended to decrease during moulting. Gut passages per day increased from 1.1 at 13°C to 3.4 at 21°C followed by a decrease to 1.6 at 25°C.
A Praël, S M Cragg, R A Eaton


Influence of bark damage on bluestain development in pine logs
1997 - IRG/WP 97-10197
Mechanized harvesting of conifers can lead to extensive bark damage, with the resulting wounds providing suitable entry points for bluestain fungi that are not associated with bark beetle vectors. However, the amount of bluestain colonisation can vary greatly between the different types of wound. To evaluate the effect of wound type seven different types of wounds were artificially created on freshly felled logs of Corsican pine. These ranged from barely visible punctures, to the removal of large strips of bark, simulating typical harvester damage. The logs were left in the field exposed to natural inocula of wood degrading fungi and assessed after 6 and 12 weeks. Results indicated that surface area of injury was not the best parameter for predicting the rate and extent of staining. Minor disruptions of the bark e.g. crushing and punctures, were sometimes associated with substantial amounts of stain development. Wounds with flaps of loosened but still attached bark were especially susceptible to bluestain colonization, but additional damage to exposed wood surfaces did not result in more stain. Stain development was strongly associated with the edges of wounds where the bark and exposed wood met. Excluding potential bluestain vectors such as bark beetles and weevils by enclosing the logs in netting did not markedly reduce stain, suggesting that micro-arthropods such as mites play an important part in disseminating bluestain fungi to wounds produced during harvesting and log extraction.
A Uzunovic, J F Webber, D J Dickinson


Development of decay in untreated, second-growth Douglas-Fir using two exposure techniques in North Queensland
1997 - IRG/WP 97-20110
The results of two exposure techniques for evaluating the development of wood decay in untreated, mill-run lumber from second-growth Douglas-fir containing both sapwood and heartwood are presented. Nominal 50 mm by 100 mm by 2.5 m (2 in. by 4 in. by 8 ft) lumber, No 2 and better, was obtained from a production run in a mill that was processing second growth, Coastal Douglas-fir in western Oregon, USA. Untreated wood members were kiln dried, then shipped to Queensland. At the Timber Research Laboratory, Indooroopilly, Queensland, two units for above-ground exposure were fabricated from each 2.5-m (8-ft) untreated member. A 600-mm (2-ft) length was cut from each end of each member. One 600-mm section was transversely bisected, forming two, 300-mm (12in.) units; the other 600-mm section was used in a separate study. The middle 1200-mm (4-ft) length was used as one exposure unit. These shorter members were then milled to form a joint with a 100-mm (4-in.) overlap. Two holes were drilled through the overlapping portions, and the two sections were bolted together. The identity of the 1200mm length and the end-matched lapped jointed section was maintained throughout the exposure. Both units were positioned on a horizontal support approximately 1 m above ground in an open field near Innisfail, Queensland. As units were installed in the field, all cut surfaces inside the joint and at the ends were brush coated with a commercially available (in Australia) copper naphthenate emulsion containing 1% copper. Decay was first detected after 2 years of exposure and it advanced rapidly during the third year. The pattern of results suggests that the weathering of the upper, exterior surface and the retention of a high moisture content by the 50-mm-thick wood, when wetted, is more important in predisposing wood to decay than is end-grain absorption of moisture. Decay ratings for the 1200-mm members were equivalent to those observed with the lapped joints. The two types of units are of equal utility in demonstrating the potential for decay in a wood material that has natural susceptibility to decay.
J Norton, S Kleinschmidt, R C De Groot, D Crawford


Preliminary attempts towards the development of a small-scale termite rearing chamber
1982 - IRG/WP 1148
The paper suggests how to prepare a small-scale rearing chamber for termites which might be used for testing the effectiveness of possible termiticides. A technique for breeding the termites is suggested.
M Argoud, J Mocotte, R Sternalsky


Development of a method for testing wood preservatives with soft rot fungi
1975 - IRG/WP 250
Although the first publications on experimental soft rot attack date back 20 years ago, so far no test method for evaluating the efficacy of wood preservatives against soft rot attack (Ascomycetes and Fungi Imperfecti) has been generally accepted. The reasons are diverse and the shortcomings and the disadvantages of the methods described are well known and have repeatedly been discussed. The soil burial method developed by G. THEDEN (1961) using non-sterilised soils with their natural flora of micro-organisms is said to be poorly reproducible. One possibility to work with clearly defined test fungi and easily reproducible test conditions was developed and described by P. KAUNE in the BAM as the vermiculite burial method. For the further development of this method, in the past years numerous investigations have been made in the BAM to select test fungi and define a test arrangement. Their results will be summarised below.
M Gersonde, W Kerner-Gang


A baiting technique to monitor the development and control of decay in transmission poles
1981 - IRG/WP 2149
P I Morris, D J Dickinson


Development of an Australasian protocol for assessment of wood preservatives
1994 - IRG/WP 94-20043
The Australasian Wood Preservation Committee (AWPC) is currently developing a suite of assessment procedures (protocols) for the biocidal efficacy of wood preservatives for approval in Australasia (Australia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Fiji). Protocols are being prepared for the six hazard levels recognised in the relevant standards of member countries and represent the minimum procedures required to provide biocidal efficacy data which may be needed to obtain preservative approval and registration by the appropriate regulatory authorities. The protocols cover a combination of laboratory and/or field testing. This document presents a brief outline of the proposed format of the protocols.
W D Gardner, H Greaves, M E Hedley, K J McCarthy, J Norton


Wood preservative development: Have we learnt anything, and where will it take us?
1994 - IRG/WP 94-30054
This paper addresses the disparate approaches to the development and approval of wood preservatives used in a number of regions, and the implications of the test requirements, or lack thereof, on the likely performance of the subsequent treated wood in service. The test methodologies and performance criteria used in various regions will have long term consequences for the future of the wood preservation industry in the affected areas. Potential positive and negative impacts of such influences and change are also addressed.
A F Preston


Development on Damage Functions of Wood Decay for Building Envelope Design
2005 - IRG/WP 05-10556
For the hygrothermal analyses of building envelope systems for insulation design, we tried a natural decay test of wetted wood specimens without any inoculation of fungi. Three principal experimental types: under steady-state conditions (Experiment A), at a cyclic water dripping under Non-steady conditions (Experiment B) and at a cyclic water dipping under-steady conditions (Experiment C), were carried out for this purpose. After these tests, each specimen was determined its longitudinal compression strength. The detection of decay was checked this standard strength value by species according to Japanese building code and its corrected value by these moisture contents. As the results of the Experiment A, some fungal growth was observed within 10 weeks at the moisture contents of levels between 30wt% and 70wt%. As the results of the Experiment B, the simulated condition of short time condensation in summer was observed fungal growth but not affected decay problems within 124 weeks. As the results of the Experiment C, the simulated condition of periodical wetting as under floor or bottom of cladding was not observed any decay.
H Suzuki, Y Kitadani, K Suzuki, A Iwamae, H Nagai


The development of a screening method for the activity of pyrethroids against wood boring marine crustaceans, Limnoria spp
1978 - IRG/WP 443
The present work is concerned with the develepment of a suitable bio-assay technique to determine the biological activity (contact action) of pyrethroids against Limnoria spp. Estimates of the toxicity of three pyrethroids, permethrin, cypermethrin and decamethrin (the structures of which are shown in Fig. 1.) to the marine borer have been obtained.
D Rutherford, R C Reay, M G Ford


Wood Protection in China
2009 - IRG/WP 09-30516
The wood protection has been recognised in ancient China, and has made the tremendous contribution to the knowledge and techniques of wood protection. The paper mainly introduced the development and situation of China wood protection industry, including industry organization, policy guidance, standardization system, quality supervision, training, technical exchange, project HYPERLINK "http://dj.iciba.com/extension/" \t "_blank" extension and so on. These works will rapidly promote the development of China wood protection industry.
Zhongwei Jin


Strategy development in 2008/2009
2008 - IRG/WP 08-60265
J Norton


Status of Wood Protection in Slovenia
2010 - IRG/WP 10-40491
Status of wood protection in Slovenia is described in this document. The most important factors that influence use of wood in our country are outlined. Furthermore, there are companies that formulate wood preservatives, their products and wood impregnation facilities are listed as well.
M Humar


Der Fall Lyctus. Skizzen über Auftreten, Bedeutung und Bekämpfung eines Holzwurms
1980 - IRG/WP 1100
Lyctus brunneus (Steph.) and allied species cause severe damage to wood throughout the world and inflict losses on producers, the trade, industries and craftsmen. Starch-containing wood is liable to attack. The history of the accidental introduction of this wood-destroyer into West-Europe and the causes for this are outlined, biological requirements for the attack as well as developments for Lyctus-control are outlined considering results of new investigations. To day the exent of damage by Lyctiides excercises an influence on timber reserves and on the usage of light timber species.
S Cymorek


Fungal Stain Development in Canadian Hardwood Logs
2004 - IRG/WP 04-10505
In most sawmills around the world, trees are harvested into logs and stored in the forest or in a log yard for a period of time before being sawn into lumber. These logs may be attacked by various pigmented fungi, which results in staining of the wood. Since hardwood species are used to a great extent in furniture manufacturing and in the making of other valuable wood products, the reduction of wood staining in these species has a significant economic impact. This study investigated storage time limits in sawmill yards for the major Canadian hardwood species, with and without water sprinkling. Sugar maple, yellow birch, and white birch trees were selected and felled in summer and winter and transported to two sawmills in Quebec, Canada. At each site, one group of logs was dry-stacked and another was stored under water sprinkling in the sawmill yard. Until October, inspections of dry-stacked logs were conducted every 2 weeks and the water-sprinkled logs were inspected every 4 weeks. The logs were cut into discs and wood moisture content was measured; fungal stain and check development were also examined. The results showed that 3 weeks after harvesting, fungal stain had not occured on summer-harvested sugar maple or yellow birch logs. Minor staining was measured in logs of both species after 5 weeks in storage. Significant staining was found after 7 weeks of storage and serious staining occurred after 9 weeks or more of storage. After 13 weeks in storage, most sapwood of the dry-stacked logs was stained. Log ends had more staining than internal sections. On exposed wood without bark protection, most fungal infections started within 5 weeks of felling. However, after 5 weeks of storage, when wood moisture content had decreased to a certain level, thus providing less protection, staining fungi began to attack bark-covered wood. The results of the second trial showed that winter-harvested logs were more resistant to fungal stain than summer-harvested logs. Moreover, those harvested in the winter did not sustain much staining the following spring. Until the end of June of the following year, only 1.9% wood of dry-stacked sugar maple logs, 2.2% wood of yellow birch logs, and 2% wood of white birch logs were stained. Stain development in the logs increased rapidly in July and August. White birch was most affected by stain, followed by yellow birch, and, finally, sugar maple. Water-sprinkled logs were well protected from stain. Check development on logs under the two storage methods showed that, in dry storage, sugar maple logs developed more physical checks than the yellow birch and white birch. Most checks formed on the ends rather than in internal sections of the logs. Water sprinkling limited check formation on all logs. Fewer checks developed in winter-harvested logs (site two) than in summer-harvested logs (site one).
Dian-Qing Yang, M-C Bisson


Development of a turbidity method for the determination of water repellent in CCA treatment solutions
2000 - IRG/WP 00-40177
The use of aqueous water repellent emulsion formulations has increased significantly in the wood treatment industry. These are primarily used to enhance the weathering characteristics of wood products treated with water borne preservatives systems used in exterior above ground exposures. However, they are also used in pole treatments to improve the climbing characteristics and in low VOC millwork treatments. With the increase in water repellent treated wood production there was a requirement to develop analytical methods for the determination of the water repellent concentration in treatment solutions for quality control at wood treatment facilities. Various methods were examined for the determination of water repellent emulsions in wood treatment solutions. Of the methods considered the turbidity method was found the best suited for routine quality control at treated wood production facilities. The effects of emulsion concentration and particle size on the turbidity measurements were evaluated.
P J Walcheski, L Jin


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