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Working Group I Sub-group 5 'Insects in dry wood'. Plan for data sheets
1982 - IRG/WP 1173
S Cymorek


Insects in dry wood (other than termites)
1977 - IRG/WP 153
S Cymorek


Working Group I 'Biological Problems' Sub-group 'Insects in dry wood (other than termites)', Scope of work
1976 - IRG/WP 152
S Cymorek


On the problem "House Longhorn Beetle" in hardwoods and an aid to distinguish between Hylotrypes bajulus and Hesperophanes cinereus larvae
1981 - IRG/WP 1141
S Cymorek


Changed susceptibility of the chemically and thermally degraded spruce wood to its attack by the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans
1999 - IRG/WP 99-10322
In buildings, some intentional or unintended situations can occur at which some wood products are exposed to aggressive chemicals and also to higher temperatures. Occasional activity of fungi on such pre-attacked wood products can be either higher or lower. This paper deals with changes in the susceptibility of spruce wood (Picea abies L. Karst.) to attack by the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans, ...
L Reinprecht


List of Members of IRG and contributing workers proposed for membership in IRG/WP/ - I - Sub-group 5
1976 - IRG/WP 154
S Cymorek


Minutes of WG I, Sub-group 5 Insects in dry wood
1983 - IRG/WP 1220
IRG Secretariat


Documentation on Merulius (Serpula) lacrimans (Wulf.) Fr. according to the "Model Questionnaire for preparation of monographic cards for wood-destroying fungi"
1972 - IRG/WP 108
J Segmüller, O Wälchli


Questionnaire on the most important wood-destroying insects in your country and/or state
1980 - IRG/WP 1125
S Cymorek


How to keep coated wood structures sufficiently dry to avoid damage caused by rot
1991 - IRG/WP 2376
During the last ten years, a new type of problems with wood rot has emerged in Scandinavia. Thousands of houses have been damaged by wood rot attaching to the exterior wood panel. This paper provides an overview of finished and ongoing work in order to identify the cause of these problems. In field tests, the moisture conditions were measured in panels coated with different paint systems. The infl...
S Hjort


Fungal resistance of smoke-dried Cryptomeria japonica wood
1998 - IRG/WP 98-40118
Performance of smoke dried wood on fungal resistance was studied. The maximum temperature of the smoke seasoning was 80-90°C in the drying room and 70-80°C within the wood for 6 days during the treatment for 15 days. Decay resistance of smoke-dried Cryptomeria japonica wood was evaluated using a brown rot fungus, Tyromyces palustris. Weight losses of untreated wood, smoke-dried wood, and smoke-d...
K Yamamoto, I Momohara, T Nishimura


Treating Eucalyptus tereticornis wood with boron: Optimizing treatment conditions
2005 - IRG/WP 05-40309
Even though Eucalyptus tereticornis wood is suitable for small timber purposes, being non-durable, it needs to be treated with preservative chemicals. As it is a heavy, hard and difficult to treat species, the possibility of using diffusible boron compounds was investigated. The present study explored the effect of impregnation conditions such as treatment schedule, concentration of treatment solu...
T K Dhamodaran, R Gnanaharan


Bifenthrin, a new insecticide for the control of termites and wood-boring insects
1995 - IRG/WP 95-30076
Bifenthrin, a new insecticidal compound Bifenthrin has been extensively tested, to determine its potential use to control termites and other wood destroying insects. Bifenthrin is effective at extreme low rates which can minimize human and environmental exposure to the product. Results of tests carried out by several research institutes and by FMC in different countries will be presented. The phys...
G Rustenburg


Volumes and weights of different CCA-C treated wood poles, anchor logs and crossarms of REB at air dry condition
1996 - IRG/WP 96-40073
Researches revealed the unit volumes and weights at air-dry condition (12% MC) of different poles, anchor logs and crossarms species of REB from this world. The softwood products are lighter than hardwood products. Inversely the unit volumes of softwood poles are higher than those of hardwood poles. Red pine (Pinus resinosa), radiata pine (Pinus radiata), blue pine (Pinus wallichiana), fir (Abies ...
A K Lahiry


The dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans, its growth and damaging of wood
2004 - IRG/WP 04-10511
The dry rot fungus (Serpula lacrymans) is one of the most dangerous wood rotting fungi, especially in the built environment. In our mycological laboratory more experiments with this fungus have been carried out aimed at:- its growth under stable and variable climatic conditions, - its possibility to attack either natural wood of different species and also modified wood primary pre-treated with ...
L Reinprecht


Fungal Stain Development in Canadian Hardwood Logs
2004 - IRG/WP 04-10505
In most sawmills around the world, trees are harvested into logs and stored in the forest or in a log yard for a period of time before being sawn into lumber. These logs may be attacked by various pigmented fungi, which results in staining of the wood. Since hardwood species are used to a great extent in furniture manufacturing and in the making of other valuable wood products, the reduction of wo...
Dian-Qing Yang, M-C Bisson


Serpula lacrymans, The Dry Rot Fungus and its Tolerance towards Copper-based Wood Preservatives
2005 - IRG/WP 05-10555
Serpula lacrymans (Wulfen : Fries) Schröter, the dry rot fungus, is considered the most economically important wood decay fungus in temperate regions of the world i.e. northern Europe, Japan and Australia. Previously copper based wood preservatives were the most commonly used preservatives for pressure treatment of wood for building constructions. Because of a suspicion about tolerance toward cop...
A C Steenkjær Hastrup, F Green III, C A Clausen, B Jensen


Proposing innovative technologies in the control of dry-wood insects
1985 - IRG/WP 1262
This paper discusses the social-economic problems involved in the biological evaluation of dry-wood insects with particular reference to Nigeria. It also discusses prospects of applying non-conventional methods of control against such insects, integrating these with the conventional preservatives as a control strategy. This discussion follows attempts made to identify the major dry-wood insects in...
M O Akanbi


Respiration measurement of dry-rot
1995 - IRG/WP 95-10095
Methods for measuring the production of carbondioxide from wood infected with the dry-rot fungus were evaluated. By enclosing whole wood blocks and measuring the concentration of gas in the headspace by gas chromatography, an exponential increase in the concentration of CO2 was observed for at least 2 months. This technique could therefore present a method for evaluating various treatments of dry-...
L Toft


Durability aspects of (hydro)thermal treated wood
2000 - IRG/WP 00-40160
Samples of several wood species were treated in a two steps process, subsequently hydrothermal and dry heat-treated, by the so-called PLATO-process and analysed for their resistance against fungal attack. Both PLATO-treated and dry heat-treated specimen were prepared and analysed, in order to study the influence of moisture during hydrothermal treatment of wood. The resistance against all of the s...
B F Tjeerdsma, M Stevens, H Militz


Preliminary testing of an improvised wood preservative mixture applied against dry wood beetles
1986 - IRG/WP 1308
An improvised wood preservative mixture was preliminarily tested in situ against some dry wood beetles which had infested structural timbers in a semi-finished building. The results obtained should encourage further research towards mobilizing/improvising locally available resources in the face of scarce standard wood preservatives, against the background of a dilemma in wood utilization in the de...
M O Akanbi, E M Bayode, A A Alabi, J Gbadebo


A new type of biocide suitable for use in different fields of wood preservation
1993 - IRG/WP 93-30014
A new type of polymeric biocides was developed containing quaternary ammonium and boron ester groups as active structure elements, to overcome the disadvantages of AAC's in wood preservation use and to utilise their good performance due to a broad efficacy against fungi on the other hand. The new biocides called polymeric betains have been tested in laboratory and field tests and especial...
V Barth, H Härtner


Effects of steaming heat treatment of wood on the stimulation of termite feeding
1997 - IRG/WP 97-10212
At the 26th IRG conference, we reported that steamed Japanese larch heartwood samples were suffered a serious attack by subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus both in choice and no-choice feeding tests. This is possibly caused by the yield of termites stimulants in the wood samples resulting from the steaming process. Since the steaming heat treatment has often been applied to other several ...
S Doi, Y Kurimoto, M Takahashi, T Yoshimura


Laboratory tests on the residual effects of pyrethroids against termites thirteen years after application
1994 - IRG/WP 94-30056
This paper is in continuation to a series of articles published on the work being developed in Brazil regarding the feasibility of using photostabl synthetic pyrethroids against termites. Tests were carried out to compare the efficacy of five synthetic pyrethroids with the traditional organo-chlorinated pesticide, chlordane. Wooden blocks were impregnated with alcohol-based solutions of the above-...
A M F Oliveira


Gypsum effects on ‘dry rot’ wood degradation as a function of environment
2007 - IRG/WP 07-10624
‘Dry rot’ fungi are a unique group of brown rot fungi that can degrade wood away from ground contact where other fungi fail to colonize. Successfully occupying this niche is partially due to efficient water and nutrient transport, but mobilizing elements, notably calcium (Ca) and iron (Fe), from adjacent building materials has also been implicated in their success. Here we report a series of t...
J Schilling, J Jellison


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