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Ekki heartwood - is “Durable”
2002 - IRG/WP 02-10444
Severe decay damages of bridges made of ekki (Lophira alata Banks) wood which is classified as a durable species in the EN 350:2 as already reported at the 31 IRG annual meeting. This paper deals with results of long-term decay tests of ekki heartwood specimens using 3 isolates (Loweporus tephroporus 2 strains and a fungus of other sp. from damaged ekki bridges) and Trametes versicolor as a reference. Sound ekki heartwood specimens, sized 20(T) x 20(R) x 5(L) mm were used. References were Japanese beech (Fagus crenata) specimens having the same dimensions. Oven dry weights of the specimens were measured at 60 oC for 48 h before and after the decay process. Nine replications of specimens were used per set. The procedure of decay test was about the same as that of the JIS Z 2101. All the test fungi including T versicolor decayed ekki heartwood in the case of long-term exposure (more than 6 months) using the appropriate nutritional condition under optimum temperatures. These facts suggest that the results of standardised decay test methods should be carefully interpreted.
S Doi, R Itoh, S Horisawa


Severe decay damages of bridges made of ekki (Lophira alata) wood known as a durable species
2000 - IRG/WP 00-10383
Bridges made of ekki (azobe, bongossi, Lophira alata Banks et Gaertn.) timbers were severely decayed only 10 years after the construction possibly caused from no maintenance for the periods. The reason of no maintenance is due to the misunderstandings on wood durability against wood-decaying fungi. Some civil-engineers and architectures understand "durable species" means "absolutely decay-durable species." They recently like to use durable wood species imported from abroad instead of domestic wood treated with preservatives because Japanese policies and civic insistences avoid to use wood preservatives to maintain natural environment and human health. This paper deals with the details of the typical decay damages of wooden bridges.
S Doi, T Sasaki, Y Iijima


Alternative timbers to Iroko (Milicia excelsa) for various end-uses: Ghana’s offer
2004 - IRG/WP 04-10518
There are hundreds of timber species indigenous to Ghana and several exotic species have been extensively planted. The timber industry in Ghana is very important to the country’s economy. Despite its small size relative to the world trade in timber products, it has the potential to be a driving force in the development of the Ghanaian economy. The industry is currently going through a period of change and restructuring which is largely brought about by the need to address the issues of a reducing resource and to use the available resource more efficiently and to greater economic benefit by promoting the lesser used species as alternatives to the over-exploited primary species and also by developing the tertiary processing sector. Iroko (Milicia excelsa) is one of the primary species currently facing extinction and Dahoma (Piptadanistrum africanus), Ekki (Lophira elata), Kusia (Nauclea diderrichii) and Papao (Afzelia bella) are lesser-used species being promoted as good alternatives to Iroko for various end uses. Properties (mechanical, biological) and volumes of these species are compared to those of Iroko.
S A Amartey, Zeen Huang, A Attah