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Extending the useful life of creosoted electricity distribution poles in service
1993 - IRG/WP 93-50001-16
Creosoted transmission poles have provided good service over many decades in a whole range of environments. The use of save biocides for secondary treatments has the potential to extend the life of such poles. These techniques, together with a full understanding of the modes of failure, make it possible to establish new strategies to further improve the environmental benefits of treated wooden poles.
D J Dickinson, B Calver


The evaluation of the occurrence of soft rot in creosoted wooden poles
1988 - IRG/WP 1368
The occurrence of soft rot decay in creosoted wooden poles for overhead power lines was investigated by collection of field samples, their subsequent microscopic examination and statistical analysis of the data collected. Examination of samples collected from 296 poles revealed that approximately 15% of the pole population studied (Eastern Electricity Board) showed the presence of soft rot decay. Further, it was found that of undated poles, (those emplaced before 1953,) 17% displayed soft rot attack.
A Wylde, D J Dickinson


The secondary treatment of creosoted electricity poles with fused boron rods
1988 - IRG/WP 3485
After preliminary trials selected poles were treated at the groundline with fused boron rods. Early samplings showed that movement was slow in the dry heartwood but after six years the distributions obtained indicate that the system has merit for the treatment of the heartwood of poles in service.
D J Dickinson, P I Morris, B Calver


Electricity pole treatments - Wedding Bells State Forest. Inspection September 1983
1985 - IRG/WP 3334
A survey to study the extent of soft rot in hardwood poles in N.S.W. was commenced in 1975. The results of the survey, published in 1982, indicated that a number of factors contributed towards soft rot attack on poles in service. A detailed rest on pole treatments and maintenance procedures was established in 1976, at a site in Wedding Bells State Forest near Coffs Harbour. The site selected was known to have a high fungal and termite hazard. The layout of the pole stubs and treatments given at this and subsequent installations is shown in Appendix 1. Inspections of the poles are being carried out on a regular basis, the last inspection being in September, 1983. A representative number of poles were also examined from those installed and treated in March and October, 1979, and November, 1980. Interest stimulated by these tests has resulted in an increasing number of local and overseas suppliers of protective applications to poleswanting to test their products at this site, the last new installation being in October, 1983.
R S Johnstone, R H Eldridge


Growth inhibitory effects on blue-stain fungi of applied electricity fields
1996 - IRG/WP 96-10167
Exploratory laboratory experiments on the effects of electricity on two blue stain fungi Aureobasidium pullulans and Ceratocystis piceae on wood revealed that a potential gradient of 1 V/cm corresponding to a current of 15 mA (DC), applied without interruption during a 2 week experimental period, leads to an inhibition of the growth of these fungi. Germination is somewhat more sensitive than mycelial growth. Experiments also revealed that a potential gradient of 10-25 V/cm applied for 30 sec, 3 times every 24 h also inhibited the growth of Aureobasidium pullulans. The mechanism by which electricity exerts its growth inhibiting effect on blue stain fungi on wood is presently unclear.
J Bjurman