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Utilisation of carbohydrates by stain fungi in agar culture
1998 - IRG/WP 98-10248
Stain fungi are often defined by their ability to utilise the starch and free sugars found in ray parenchyma cells, and their inability to utilise other wood constituents. However, several species of stain fungi produce bore holes in wood cell walls. This suggests that enzymatic activity capable of degrading structural polysaccharides and/or lignin is associated with the growth of the appressorium...
J Snow, P Vinden, S M Read


Differential susceptibility of living and dead timber to colonisation by sapstain and mould fungi
1998 - IRG/WP 98-10288
Field studies have revealed that when timber is irradiated (i.e. killed) it is more susceptible to colonisation by mould fungi than sapstain fungi. By comparison, freshly sawn timber shows very little mould colonisation, tending to be colonised by sapstain fungi. It appears, therefore that the physiological state of the wood may influence the pattern of colonisation. A laboratory trial was underta...
J R Williams, D J Dickinson, J F Webber


Phenol oxidase activity and one-electron oxidation activity in wood degradation by soft-rot deuteromycetes
2007 - IRG/WP 07-10615
Wood degradation, one-electron oxidation activity as assayed by ethylene generation from 2-keto-4-thiomethylbutyric acid (KTBA), and phenol oxidase activity were measured in cultures of six deuteromyce fungi, with glucose or wood as the carbon source. The four fungi that degraded Japanese beech wood had higher one-electron oxidation activities in wood-containing cultures than in glucose-containing...
H Tanaka, M Yamakawa, S Itakura, A Enoki


Which fungi cause sapstain in Canadian softwoods?
1998 - IRG/WP 98-10285
The Canadian forest products industry suffers considerable losses in revenue due to fungal stains. There is an increased awareness that more complete knowledge about the causal organisms might help solve the problem. A first step was to initiate a thorough survey of bluestain fungi in Canada. Systematic sampling was done at seven selected sawmills in six Canadian provinces. In summer 1997 fresh lo...
A Uzunovic, Dian-Qing Yang, P Gagné, C Breuil, L Bernier, A Byrne


Targeting fungal proteinases to prevent sapstain on wood
1995 - IRG/WP 95-10097
Discoloration of wood, caused by a variety of sapstaining fungi, leads to periodic losses in the Canadian lumber export industry. Proteolytic enzymes are thought to be necessary for retrieval of nitrogen during fungal growth on wood. The major extracellular proteinase of Ophiostoma piceae, a representative sapstaining fungus, was purified to homogeneity and its inhibition pattern characterised. Cl...
L D Abraham, D E Bradshaw, A Byrne, P I Morris, C Breuil


The 1999-2000 annual report for the IRG - Wood Preservation in Egypt
2000 - IRG/WP 00-40188
The wood destroying insects in Egypt are belonging to several families of Coleoptera, Lepidoptera and Isoptera. Imported woods are treated by The Agricultural Quarantine or the authorized companies. The materials used for protection as pre-treatment are the same of the treatment. They are Bromide methyl, copper or fluoride salts, organo-phosphorus compounds, pyrethroides, creosote or creosodial. A...
S I M Moein


Characterisation of growth and stain of different groups of sapstain fungi on lodgepole pine
1999 - IRG/WP 99-10326
Canada is the world's largest exporter of softwood lumber. These softwood shipments are susceptible to a variety of wood-inhabiting fungi that can lead to sapstain discolouration, which in turn decrease the product value. Furthermore, the presence of these microorganisms may be unacceptable to the importing countries. The objective of this work is to assess the sapstaining capability and ...
C Fleet, C Breuil, A Uzunovic, A Byrne


Effect of methylene bisthiocyanate on morphology and ultra-structure of a sapstain fungus, Ophiostoma floccosum
2003 - IRG/WP 03-10471
In vitro effects of methylene bisthiocyanate (MBT) on hyphal morphology and ultrastructure of Ophiostoma floccosum were examined using differential interference contrast, epifluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Differential interference contrast microscopy suggested that MBT caused rapid changes to the morphology of O. floccosum resulting in excessive formation of vacuoles and...
T Singh, B Kreber, R N Wakeling, A Stewart


Variation in Canadian bluestain fungi: Tolerance to DDAC and DOT
1999 - IRG/WP 99-10303
Bluestain in Canadian wood products results in significant and unpredictable losses each year. In order to develop rational methods to eliminate or reduce the sapstain problem, a more complete knowledge of the causal organisms must be gained. This includes a knowledge of the variability in tolerance of different fungal species and strains to commercially used chemicals. In British Columbia, the ma...
J Dubois, A Byrne, J E Clark, A Uzunovic


The leachability and specificity of the biological protection of timber using Scytalidium sp. and Trichoderma spp
1986 - IRG/WP 1302
The results of field experiments, using biological control against internal decay of creosoted poles, are briefly reviewed and the evidence concerning the leachability of the antibiotics produced by these species is presented. A pure culture miniblock decay test on biological control treated pine sapwood is described and the results compared to previously published data. The protection against Len...
P I Morris, N A Summers, D J Dickinson


Marine performance of preservative treated Southern pine panels. Part 2: Exposure at Mourilyan Harbour, Queensland, Australia
2000 - IRG/WP 00-10337
Southern yellow pine panels treated with ACQ type B, ACQ type A, CCA type C, creosote, and copper naphthenate have been exposed at Mourilyan Harbour, north Queensland, Australia for almost 6 years. These panels have been inspected and rated for fouling and attack by Teredinid, Limnoria, Martesia, and Sphaeroma during this exposure. After 70 months exposure, overall performance of ACQ type B was eq...
A R Zahora, A F Preston, K J Archer, S Kleinschmidt


Copper-resistant fungi on pressure impregnated wood in Denmark
1994 - IRG/WP 94-10078
The occurence of Amorphotheca resinae Parbery and its asexual stage Cladosporium resinae (Lindau) de Vries on CCA and CCB treated wood has previously been shown. In the autumn 1993 some other blue stain fungi were found on CCP and CCB treated pine timber, such as Ophiostoma minus (Hedgc.) H. and P. Sydow, Ophiostoma pilifera (Fr.) H. and P. Sydow and Ophiostona piceae (Munch) H. and P. Sydow. The ...
J Bech-Andersen, S A Elborne


The yeast Pichia sp. As a short-term biological control agent to fungal spoilage of sawn softwood timber
2000 - IRG/WP 00-10362
Previous work has found isolates of the yeast Pichia to be a successful biological control agent toward moulding of fruits. An isolate was tested for the ability to protect sapwood of Pinus sylvestris timber against visual degrade by surface growth of moulds and staining fungi. Successful protection of autoclaved wood sprayed with a mixture of common wood moulding fungi was achieved when the yeast...
C Payne, H J Staines, A Bruce


The use of immunofluorescence labelling for detecting Ophiostoma piceae in radiata pine
1998 - IRG/WP 98-10268
The primary objective of the current investigation is to understand fungal interactions of dominant sapstaining fungi in radiata pine using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). In the current paper, an immunofluorescence labelling technique was developed for detection of Ophiostoma piceae using a monoclonal antibody. The primary antibody was labelled with Oregon green 514 Goat anti-mouse Ig...
Ying Xiao, B Kreber, C Breuil


Biological control of sapstain fungi in wood
1996 - IRG/WP 96-10158
Sapstain fungi can cause serious damage to wood and wood products, resulting in a significant economic loss for the wood products industry. The purpose of the present investigation was to determine whether the sapstain in wood caused by sapstain fungi could be biologically controlled. Biological control of sapstain fungi in wood was demonstrated in field trials with nonpigmented isolates of Cerato...
S C Croan


Laboratory evaluation of chlorothalonil formulation for stain and mold control on rubberwood and maple
1998 - IRG/WP 98-30175
We evaluated the efficacy of several chlorothalonil and carbendazim fungicides (F1 and F2), etc. in the control of mold and stain fungi on rubberwood and maple. The results showed that these formulations effectively inhibited the selected fungal species such as Aspergillus niger, Penicillium sp., Trichoderma sp. (P71H), Aureobasidium pullulans, Ceratocystis minor (C-188), Ceratocystis pilifera (RW...
Mingliang Jiang, T L Highley, L Ferge, T L Woods


Laboratory tests on light organic solvent preservatives for use in Australia. - Part 6: Soft rot resistance of three fully formulated preservatives on different timber substrates
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30245
The above-ground soft rot resistance of substrates treated with three fully formulated light organic solvent preservatives (Cuprivac Green WR, Impresol WR 205 and Vacsol) was studied using a modified vermiculite burial method. The substrates were sapwood of Pinus elliottii and P. radiata and heartwood of Eucalyptus regnans, Pseudotsuga menziesii, Shorea sp. (a lower and a higher density source) an...
G C Johnson, M A Tighe, J D Thornton


Using DNA probes to characterize the metabolic pathway of pigment production in several wood-staining fungi
1996 - IRG/WP 96-10146
During shipment and storage, lumber is susceptible to sapstain, a wood discoloration caused by fungi. Currently kiln drying and chemical applications are used to control sapstain. However, the chemicals used to protect wood have a broad range of action, and so can affect other organisms. In addition, in Canada most of these chemicals are under temporary registration. Thus there is a need to develo...
R Eagen, S Riecken, J Kronstad, C Breuil


Transformation of Ophiostoma picea and Trichoderma harzianum with green fluorescent protein (GFP)
2003 - IRG/WP 03-10477
While microbial colonization of wood is presumed to be characterized by a myriad of interactions between numerous organisms, studying these processes is often difficult owing to the opaque nature of the wood and the inability to readily distinguish among the many species colonizing the material. One method for enhancing the ability to distinguish organisms is to induce specific proteins in one or ...
Ying Xiao, L M Ciuffetti, J J Morrell


Monitoring the potential biological control agent Cartapip
2000 - IRG/WP 00-10365
Attempts to biocontrol woodstain caused by Ophiostoma species led to the development of an O. piliferum colorless mutant - Cartapip (AgraSoL). The mutant's ability to prevent sapstain of stored logs and lumber is tested in a variety of field trials in Germany, England, Canada and New Zealand. To carry out biocontrol field trials, users have to obtain a permit from a regulatory agency and ...
S Schröder, K Sterfinger, Seong Hwan Kim, C Breuil


Localized induction of hemlock brownstain by Ophiostoma piceae
1995 - IRG/WP 95-10106
Hemlock brownstain, a coloration disfiguring western hemlock and amabilis fir, causes economic loss in the high-value Canadian export lumber market. Recent work by the author has suggested that wood-sapstaining fungi can induce the formation of brownstain. Ophiostoma piceae, the most frequent staining fungus on western hemlock lumber in B.C., was chosen as a model to investigate fungal participati...
B Kreber


Natural resistance of Bamboo (Bambusa sp.) to marine wood-borers in Goa waters (India)
1993 - IRG/WP 93-10032
The paper deals with the natural durability of Bambusa sp. against the attack of marine wood-borers in Goa waters. Test specimens of this species were completely destroyed within a short period of nine months due to severe attack of borers indicating its very low natural resistance. Wood-borers involved were Martesia striata (Linnaeus), Nausitora hedleyi Schepman and Lyrodus pedicellatus (Quatrefa...
L N Santhakumaran, S G Sawant


Natural durability of 4 different Larix species tested in soil contact
2002 - IRG/WP 02-10434
Importers of Siberian Larch claimed to have a material which can replace pressure treated wood in soil contact. This gave reason to investigate the durability of 4 different Larix species (L. decidua, L. sibirica, L. decidua x sibirica, L. gmelini var ologenis) coming from 7 different origins in comparison with sapwood of Pinus sylvestris untreated as well as pressure impregnated with retentions o...
A O Rapp, H Viitanen, T Nilsson


Laboratory tests on the natural durability of timber methods and problems
1984 - IRG/WP 2217
In literature a large variety of test methods is mentioned to examine the natural resistance of timber against fungal attack. This concerns the kind of sampling as well as the test procedure, the test fungi, the duration of test, and the classification of the resistance according to the test results. These variations, however, are of great influence on the test result. Long term exposure will lead...
H Willeitner


Integrated protection of freshly sawn lumber using Bacillus subtilis and selected fungicide
1997 - IRG/WP 97-10235
Bioprotection against stain fungi has tremendous potential for reducing discoloration of freshly sawn wood while decreasing chemical consumption. Unfortunately, most bioprotectants appear to be unable to consistently perform under the array of conditions to which freshly sawn wood is exposed. While research is underway to understand the nature of the inconsistent performance, a more pragmatic appr...
M E Mankowski, M Anderson, J J Morrell


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