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Your search resulted in 269 documents. Displaying 25 entries per page.


Preservative treatment of Pinus elliottii
1987 - IRG/WP 3435
The treatment of Pinus elliottii with copper-chrome-arsenic preservative by four alternative seasoning and treatment methods is investigated. Steam conditioning followed by either alternating pressure method (APM) or 'Q' treatment resulted in inadequate preservative penetration. Air drying or high temperature drying followed by the Bethell process resulted in a high standard of t...
P Vinden, L Carter


Resin bleed after light organic solvent preservative treatment - the effect of drying method and process type
1986 - IRG/WP 3378
The effects of drying method and treatment process type on resin bleed were investigated. High-temperature drying of resinous radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) heartwood resulted in improved wood permeability, higher preservative uptake, and greater resin bleed when treated by the Rueping process. Resin bleed was reduced substantially when timber was treated by the Lowry process, and totally eli...
P Vinden


Observations on the uptake and penetration of various liquids in clear heartwood and sapwood of Pinus radiata D.Don
1983 - IRG/WP 3224
Volumetric uptake of water (aqueous copper-chrome-arsenic (CCA)) or methanol, applied by bulk hydrostatic pressure to air dried clear heartwood specimens of Pinus radiata D. Don, far exceeds that of a wide variety of polar and non-polar solvents. In air dried sapwood, the volumetric uptake of CCA tends to be less than that achieved for most solvents including methanol. No comprehensive explanation...
J E Barnacle


Quality of timber impregnated with preservatives of class AB after three years in service
2002 - IRG/WP 02-20241
Quality of impregnated timber is most often expressed by penetration and retention of the preservative used. Relatively less information is available about the performance of the final product, e.g. decks, panels etc. regarding product’s surface checks, deformations and overall appearance. Together with the timber durability, the above mention features are of esthetical importance in the above g...
N Terziev


Effects of drying processes on termite feeding behaviour against Japanese larch wood
2001 - IRG/WP 01-10390
We investigated the effects of current drying schedules for larch lumbers on the termite feedings. Thermal analyses were also conducted to investigate degradation of wood components. Choice feeding tests showed specimens dried under high-temperature schedules were evidently susceptible against termite attacks. These schedules produced the feeding-attractants, which were suggested by the TGA result...
S Doi, Y Kurimoto, H Takiuchi, M Aoyama


Wood kiln drying. Simple process of material treament or soft method of preservation? (Le séchage arificiel du bois. Simple opération de traitement du metériau ou méthode douce de préservation?)
1993 - IRG/WP 93-50001-14
Among the processes enabling to extend wood durability, kiln drying can be considered as a treatment and soft preservation method. Dry woods are naturally durable provided they are not subject to important retaking of the moisture. Drying thanks to the application of temperatures from 50 to120°C enable to execute a thermic treatment which kills grubs and mushrooms to ensure a sterilization that c...
F More-Chevalier


Termite durability of sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) heartwood kiln-dried under high-temperature process in relation to wood extractives
2005 - IRG/WP 05-10547
Termite durability of sugi heartwood samples kiln-dried under a high-temperature process were evaluated by using Reticulitermes speratus (Kolbe) as a test termite sp. The n-hexane extractives of these samples were analysed by a GC technique. The less termite durability was shown on the wood samples dried under the high-temperature process, in comparison with that of the air-dried samples. No GC-p...
S Shibutani, E Obataya, K Hanata, S Doi


Gaseous preservative treatment of wood
1990 - IRG/WP 3631
A recent development in processing wood with a gaseous preservative means that dry, treated wood can be produced in under 30 hours with the benefits of product diversification, faster stock turnover and the ability to respond to short term demand. About 400,000 m³ of wood are treated each year in New Zealand with boron salts to protect from borer infestation. Traditionally this treatment is effec...
R Burton, A J Bergervoet, K Nasheri, P Vinden, D R Page


Low temperature drying conditions of Pinus radiata wood for avoiding internal stain
1989 - IRG/WP 3507
It has been observed that, if in little sawmills, timber is dried with a low temperature schedule, it arrives at destination with internal sapstain besides of superficial mould. In this study, the lowest drying temperature at which wood should be exposed for sterilization, which results to be 52°C, is searched. It is not possible to avoid entrainment of pentachlorophenol, even though a waiting pe...
M C Rose


Comparative investigations on the influence of wood seasoning, wood properties and temperature on the toxic values of wood preservatives against Hylotrupes egg larvae
1970 - IRG/WP 28
Comparative tests carried out at three institutes indicated the influence of kiln temperature, position of wood specimens in the cross sectional area and test temperature on the toxic values determined in accordance with DIN 52165 with egg larvae of the house longhorn beetle (Hylotrupes bajulus L.). The preservatives applied were boric acid in distilled water and g-benzene-hexachloride dissolved i...
G Becker, T Hof, O Wälchli


Changed susceptibility of the chemically and thermally degraded spruce wood to its attack by the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans
1999 - IRG/WP 99-10322
In buildings, some intentional or unintended situations can occur at which some wood products are exposed to aggressive chemicals and also to higher temperatures. Occasional activity of fungi on such pre-attacked wood products can be either higher or lower. This paper deals with changes in the susceptibility of spruce wood (Picea abies L. Karst.) to attack by the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans, ...
L Reinprecht


Fixation of CCA in Pinus sylvestris after kiln-drying
1990 - IRG/WP 3594
Tanalith C Paste is 98% fixed and Tanalith Oxide C is 99% fixed irrespective of whether treated Pinus sylvestris is kiln or air dried. A schedule suitable for kiln drying of CCA treated Pinus sylvestris is described....
P Warburton, J A Cornfield, D A Lewis, D G Anderson


The effect of high temperature and long pressing time on the dimensional stability and decay resistance of OSB
2002 - IRG/WP 02-40237
The exterior use of OSB is restricted because when it is exposed to wet conditions swelling, loss of internal bond strength (IB) and decay occur. In this study an alternative process of pressing which results in the production of dimensionally stable and a more decay resistant strandboard was investigated. Boards were pressed at elevated temperatures for prolonged pressing cycles and their physi...
G J Goroyias, M D C Hale


Experiences from a Danish large scale test by means of a new method of treatment by attack of true dry rot fungus (Serpula lacrymans) in buildings
1994 - IRG/WP 94-10064
Experiences from a new and epoch-making method of treatment in connection with the repair of attack of the true dry rot fungus, Serpula lacrymans (Fr.) S.F. Gray, are described. The paper presents the background of a large scale test comprising repair of more than 150 Danish buildings over a period of approximate 5 years. The method being both gentle to the building and presenting savings of at le...
O Munck, H Sundberg


Heat transfer and wood moisture effects in moderate temperature fixation of CCA treated wood
1994 - IRG/WP 94-40022
Practical aspects of heat transfer and fixation of wood exposed to drying conditions after CCA treatment are considered. The rates of heat transfer and CCA fixation are substantially influenced by the cooling effect of water evaporating from the wood surface when drying occurs during fixation. At least in the early stages of fixation, the wood temperature approaches the wet bulb temperature, rathe...
J Chen, M Kaldas, Y T Ung, P A Cooper


Clean creosote - its development, and comparison with conventional high temperature creosote
1983 - IRG/WP 3235
Pigment emulsified creosote (PEC) is presently being tested and shows considerable stability in terms of water content, pigment level, pH, viscosity, rheological behaviour and microscopy. Timber samples from several eucalypt species have been treated with PEC and side matched samples treated with conventional high temperature creosote (HTC). The PEC treated specimens showed higher weight retention...
C W Chin, J B Watkins, H Greaves


Investigation of extracellular mucilaginous material in some wood decay fungi
1996 - IRG/WP 96-10188
The external morphology of the extracellular mucilagenous material (ECM) produced by Coriolus versicolor and Coniophora puteana during colonization of Scots pine and beech was studies using SEM. Specimens were examined in the frozen hydrated, freeze-dried and critical point dried state. All technics produced artefacts but the ECM was best preserved when examined the frozen hydated state. Critical ...
A R Abu, D J Dickinson, R J Murphy


Sterilization to limit pretreatment decay: Internal temperature during kiln drying of Douglas-fir poles
2001 - IRG/WP 01-40206
Sterilization to limit pretreatment decay: Internal temperature during kiln drying of Douglas-fir poles. Fungal colonization of poles following peeling has been the subject of considerable concern among electric utilities. While the presence of fungi does not, in itself constitute a risk, the survival of these fungi through the conventional treating processes could allow them to continue to degrad...
J J Morrell, P G Forsyth, K L Levien


Comparison of the in-ground performance of pigment emulsified creosote (PEC) and high temperature creosote (HTC)
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30217
A long-term field trial was conducted in Australia to compare the in-ground performance of two oil-borne preservative formulations, conventional high temperature creosote (HTC) and a modified creosote formulation, pigment emulsified creosote (PEC). Three retentions (50, 100 and 200 kg/m³) were targeted for each formulation. An additional retention of PEC formulation (308 kg/m³), which contained ...
J W Creffield, H Greaves, N Chew, N K Nguyen


The loss of insecticidal action from synthetic pyrethroid-treated wood samples: The effect of high temperatures and relative humidities
1992 - IRG/WP 92-1569
This paper describes the results from bioassays using Hylotrupes bajulus, and chemical analyses, of pyrethroid-treated wood samples following storage for up to 3 years. A range of four storage environments was used consisting of combinations of two temperatures (20°C and 40°C) and two relative humidities (60% and 90%). It is concluded from the chemical analyses that, although losses at room temp...
R W Berry, S J Read


Durability of Sugi (Cryptomeria japonica D.DoN ) wood treated in high temperature liquid paraffin
2002 - IRG/WP 02-40221
Sugi(Cryptomeria japonica D.DoN )wood was subject to a heat treatment in high-temperature liquid paraffin for the purpose of improving the resistance against fungi and termites without chemicals. The bath of paraffin liquid, which can provide a uniform heat transfer (±2?), was used at temperatures of 90?,120?and 150?.?ecay resistance according to JIS K 15711) was evaluated using a brown rot fungu...
Y Matsuoka, W Ohmura, S Fujiwara, Y Kanagawa


Partial seasoning and preservative treatment systems for pine roundwood
1982 - IRG/WP 3187
Experimental trials at FRI, Rotorua showed that the steaming schedule normally used for steaming and venting is also suitable for steaming and vacuum seasoning. Applying vacuum of up to -84 kPa immediately after steaming did not increase the initial loss of wood moisture significantly in comparison to steam/venting. The main improvement to wood condition by using steam/vacuum appeared to be to dis...
A J Bergervoet


High Temperature Treated Wood
2008 - IRG/WP 08-40429
High temperature can modify internal structure and physic-chemical properties of wood by a controlled pyrolysis process. Such treatment, among other changes in properties, modifies the wood color in a way that resembles exotic species, increasing its market value. The main objective of this work is to determine the changes in wood properties caused by the effect of temperature and time, in order t...
C C Borges, A L Barbosa, R Faber de Campos, S T Targas


Proposal for further work on accelerated ageing
1988 - IRG/WP 2314
M-L Edlund


Solvent drying and preservation of timber
1977 - IRG/WP 381
Processes which combine drying and preservation are first reviewed. Some preliminary experiments are then described in which blocks of green Sitka spruce sapwood were immersed, in a solution of tributyltin oxide (TBTO) in methanol at 60°C. Satisfactory penetration of the preservative and exchange of methanol and water occurred in a few hours. The methanol was removed rapidly from the wood by evap...
J A Petty


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