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Transmission poles with sub-standard retentions protected by Field Liners outperform standard poles in service
1997 - IRG/WP 97-40095
Eucalyptus cloeziana 12m transmission poles were treated with sub-standard creosote retentions of 80kg/m3 and Field Liners were fitted to the poles before they were placed in service at Umbumbulu, Kwazulu Natal. Poles treated with standard creosote retentions of 130kg/m3 but without Field Liners were also placed in service in the same area. Core samples were taken from both groups of poles after 1...
M R Behr, G D Shelver, A A W Baecker


Biostatic film as a primary treatment against pole failure in soil
1995 - IRG/WP 95-40053
Field liners of low density polyethylene (LDPE) film applied as primary treatment of soil-contact surfaces of creosote-treated poles prevented their detoxification and premature failure by establishing hurdles against microbiological colonisation. These hurdles include low water activity, low oxygen tension and nutrient limitations. Moreover, under conditions of high soil moisture, field trials sh...
A A W Baecker, M Behr


Field Liners™ prevent creosote migration from transmission poles to soil during service
1996 - IRG/WP 96-40067
A full scale trial utilised 150 12m Eucalyptus grandis transmission poles treated with standard retentions of creosote according to SABS Method 457. One hundred poles had Field Liners™ applied while 50 did not. The 150 poles were used to complete an electricity transmission line in Southern KwaZulu-Natal. After 18 months service, incremental cores were taken from 15 cm below the ground lines of ...
M R Behr, G D Shelver, A A W Baecker


A soil-less test of treated wood
1978 - IRG/WP 2105
The objective of this work is to devise an accelerated test for preservatives to be used in places away from soil contact. There may be compounds or mixtures which will protect wood or wood derived materials from decay in such articles as sash and doors, boardwalks, steps, laminated arches and the like, and possess properties that make them preferable to the heavy-duty preservatives used for poles...
E A Behr


Anti-bluestain treatment developed for log cargoes stacked in subtropical conditions for export on logging ships
1995 - IRG/WP 95-30081
Subtropical environments impose conditions of temperature, humidity and rainfall which are optimal for growth of bluestain fungi. Unprotected softwoods under such conditions become bluestained three days after felling. Furthermore, intervals between harvesting and delivery to export marketplaces exceed the 30-day protection periods attributed to anti-bluestain formulations in such conditions. Thes...
A A W Baecker, M Behr, G D Shelver


Quantification of creosote migration down wooden poles and the prevention of its depletion during flood irrigation
1994 - IRG/WP 94-50032
Polyethylene field liners heat-shrunk onto soil-contact surfaces prevented decay of creosote-treated Eucalyptus grandis vineyard poles under flood-irrigation. The present work quantified losses of creosote from these poles after six and 24 months' service. After six months' service the mean creosote retention of unlined poles above the ground line was 12.62% (m/m dry wood), with ...
M Behr, A A W Baecker


Penetration of oil-borne preservatives in American elm
1975 - IRG/WP 355
Pressure treatment of elm posts and cants by Rueping schedules resulted in erratic penetration. Instead of the expected gradual decrease in retention from surface inward in posts, inner zones frequently contained more preservative than the surface quarter inch. Heartwood was found penetrated when sapwood was not. There were numerous skips in treated zones. The prevalence and possible causes were i...
E A Behr


Treatability variation of scots pine heartwood from Northern Europe
2011 - IRG/WP 11-40563
Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) is one of the most common construction materials for general exterior applications in northern Europe. It has a wide natural geographical distribution, a good availability and it is low-priced compared to other materials. According to EN 350-2 Scots pine heartwood is considered being “untreatable” and having durability class 3. This means that its durability co...
G Behr, E Larnøy, C-T Bues


Improving dimensional stability of thermally treated wood by secondary modification – potential and limitations
2014 - IRG/WP 14-40664
The potential of treating thermally modified wood with melamine resin to improve the dimensional stabilization is tested in this research. Two different boards of poplar (Populus ssp.) were cut into two halves. One half of each board was thermally modified (T1 and T2) in a commercial process, the other half was used as untreated reference material. The material was thermally modified using the vac...
G Behr, K-C Mahnert, S Bollmus, H Militz


Weathering protection of European hardwoods through double modification
2017 - IRG/WP 17-30715
Beech and poplar were thermally modified, treated with melamine resin and both treatments were combined. The weathering performance (cracks and general appearance) of modified beech and poplar was assessed in natural weathering and correlated to material properties such as work in bending (WB) and Brinell hardness. In addition, the equilibrium moisture content after exposure of 12 months and subse...
G Behr, A Gellerich, S Bollmus, H Militz