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Efficacies of an insecticide and a fungicide for preventing blue-stain of Japanese red pine logs
2006 - IRG/WP 06-20329
We examined blue-stain fungi on Japanese red pine at 3 forests and 2 saw mills in Iwate Prefecture, Japan. The isolated ophiostomatoid fungi were Leptographium sp and Ophiostoma sp. There were 3 routes of the blue-stain; fungal growth from the spore or hypha stuck on the cross cut surfaces, fungal spread through the inner bark by bark beetles and fungal invasion around whorled knot. The larger extensions of blue-stain in summer and spring seasons were mainly caused from infestations of bark beetles. Efficacies of an insecticide and a fungicide for preventing blue-stain were also evaluated. For preventing blue-stain through the year, it was required to treat logs with the insecticide against bark beetle attacks and with the fungicide to inhibit fungal growth on the cross cut surface.
H Taniuchi, T Koiwa, H Masuya, S Doi


Efficacies of physical barriers for preventing blue-stain of Japanese red pine logs
2007 - IRG/WP 07-20359
This paper deals with field trials on physical barriers to prevent blue stain on Japanese red pine logs using a fly screen, bark and leaves of Japanese cedar as covering materials. These barriers arrested blue stain and bark beetle attacks to low levels than control for 1 month except covering with a small amount of bark. Covering with the fly screen and a large amount of bark permissibly suppressed blue stain for more than 1 month. The fly screen will be enough for practical use to prevent blue stain of pine logs.
H Taniuchi, T Koiwa, H Masuya, S Doi


Preference of Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar) for Southern Pine Blue-Stained Sapwood from Beetle-Killed Trees
2012 - IRG/WP 12-10763
Bark beetles and their associated Ophiostomatiod fungi are the major pests of pine forests in the southeastern USA, and termites are the major insect decomposers of dead trees and wood products in the southeastern USA. While both are the principal destructive insects of southern pine trees and southern pine lumber, respectively, no relationship between the two has apparently been reported in the literature. While recently inspecting bark beetle-killed southern pine trees, we noticed that subterranean termites were often present in the lower trunk of pines with incipient bark beetle infestations and always present in trees that had been dead for several months. This unusually rapid termite infestation suggested a possible attraction of termites to beetle-killed wood. AWPA E1 choice termite tests with three colonies of the subterranean termite Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar) always showed a significant feeding preference for both air-dried and kiln-dried blue-stained southern pine sapwood compared to unstained southern pine sapwood. These initial results indicate that subterranean termites play a significant role in the ecosystem of southern pine forests and carbon recycling, and termite attack on southern pine lumber cut from beetle-killed trees may be associated with the death of the host tree. As the implications of these results may be of major importance to forest health, ecology, and utilization of wood products from the southern pines, we are conducting additional laboratory and field studies.
N S Little, J J Riggins, A J Londo, T P Schultz, D D Nicholas


A suggested method to test the toxicity of wood preservatives towards the house longhorn beetle
1977 - IRG/WP 275
This method was developed in the Institute for Wood Technology in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia and is used to get quick information on the toxicity of wood preservatives against house longhorn beetle (Hylotrupes bajulus). The method can be used for superficially treated or deeply impregnated wood blocks, and by using small or normal size test material it can be used as a laboratory or field test, and also for accelerated infestation of test material out of ground contact. The paper is given to the International Research Group on Wood Preservation as a suggested method which could possibly be used as a standard. Only the laboratory test method is described.
N Vidovic


A medium for mass culturing of a bamboo boring beetle Dinoderus minutus Fabricius
1983 - IRG/WP 1182
The bamboo is a traditional product of Japan. But its susceptibility to insects is one of the most important problems. The author has found that for the determination of the effectiveness of insecticides it is very easy to obtain sufficiently numerous adults of Dinoderus minutus by using Buckwheat Cake. The Buckwheat Cake is prepared with buckwheat flour and thin paper. The author has previously found that Buckwheat Cake is suitable for the culturing of Lyctus brunneus and these results were presented in 1981. In culturing Dinoderus minutus, Buckwheat Cake has been found to be also easier and fasting in bringing forth the adults than natural bamboo.
K Suzuki


The resistance of fifteen Indonesian tropical wood species to the powder post beetle Heterobostrychus aequalis
1990 - IRG/WP 1429
A preliminary laboratory test on the resistance of 15 tropical wood species to Heterobostrychus aequalis has been carried out using small samples of 7.5 x 5 x 1.5 cm³. The results reveal that Pinus merkusii and Agathis borneensis are very susceptible to Heterobostrychus aequalis. Other 13 species vary between susceptible to resistance There is no signifisant relation between starch content and the infestation of Heterobostrychus aequalis in the fifteen wood species.
Jasni, Nana Supriana


Studies on the infestation behaviour of the powder-post beetle Lyctus brunneus (Steph.) and its physical control in the wood yards of the Caspian forests of Iran
1985 - IRG/WP 1271
Lyctus brunneus (Steph.) is a pest which has not been previously thoroughly studied in Iran. It severely attacks Iranian hardwoods, especially those used in wooden houses and that have not been treated. Research work was necessary to determine the natural resistance of the most important timber species in Iran against this insect.
P Niloufari


Supercooling points of Anobium punctatum, the common furniture beetle
1995 - IRG/WP 95-10120
Ice formation within the body of larvae of the common furniture beetle Anobium punctatum causes death of the larvae. Freezing can therefore be used as a means of eradication of the larvae in infested wood. To optimize the freezing process, knowledge of the temperatures sufficient to kill the larvae is essential. Ice formation is initiated by temperatures equaling the so-called supercooling point, which can be found experimentally. The technique used to identify the supercooling points for larvae is described. The larvae used were from laboratory cultures held at 22°C and from cultures acclimatized to 10°C.
T E Hallas, K Bohn Hansen


Antifungal activity of a stilbene glucoside from the bark of Picea glehnii
2001 - IRG/WP 01-10402
Stilbene glucosides are widely distributed as phenolic extractives in the bark of Picea glehnii, a commercially species planted in the northern area of Japan, and its content reaches to more than 10% by the dried weight of the bark. Although antifungal activities of these compounds have been reported, the mechanism of growth inhibition is still unclear. Isorhapontin (5,4'-dihydroxy-3'-methoxystilbene-3-ß-D-glucoside) is the major constituent of the stilbene glucosides in the bark of P. glehnii. In the present work, the relation between metabolism and antifungal activities of isorhapontin for the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium and the wood staining fungus Trichoderma viride was investigated. Inhibition of fungal growth was obviously depending on the conversion of isorhapontin to the aglycone isorhapontigenin (3'-methoxy-3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene) by ß-glucosidic activities in the cultures. Exogenous addition of ß-glucosidase also enhances the antifungal activity of isorhapontin. Moreover, less than 100 ppm addition of the stilbene aglycone isorhapontigenin is sufficient to inhibit the growth of both fungi. However, further metabolism of isorhapontigenin was observed after prolonged incubation of the fungi and resulted in detoxification.
S Shibutani, M Samejima


On the problem "House Longhorn Beetle" in hardwoods and an aid to distinguish between Hylotrypes bajulus and Hesperophanes cinereus larvae
1981 - IRG/WP 1141
S Cymorek


Control of death-watch beetle (Xestobium rufovillosum Deg.) with experimental permethrin smoke generators
1982 - IRG/WP 3199
This paper presents results obtaining by monitoring population figures, the condition and reproductive state of beetles collected at weekly intervals after each annual treatment.
S J Read


Bibliography on the common furniture beetle Anobium punctatum (De Geer) (Coleoptera, Anobiidae)
1980 - IRG/WP 1104
M-M Serment, H Becker


Sex pheromone of the male house longhorn beetle Hylotrupes bajulus (L.) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)
1995 - IRG/WP 95-10100
Since 1990 studies have been conducted with respect to the chemical communication of the house longhorn beetle Hylotrupes bajulus (L.) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). The structure of glands located in the prothorax of the beetles was examined with light and scanning electron microscopy. The analyses of different extracts from beetles resulted in the finding and identification (GC-, GC/MS-, and HR-GC/MS-studies) of specific substances derived from the prothoracal glands: (3R)-3-hydroxy-2-hexanone, (2R,3S)-2,3-hexanediol and (2R,3R)-2,3hexanediol. In wind tunnel experiments, unmated female beetles were attracted over a distance of 1m by males, headspace extracts of males, the 3 major components of the glands as well as by the synthetic blends of the components. Thus, the bioassays revealed the initiation of premating behaviour by emission of a long-range sex pheromone from the male prothoracal glands. The pheromone functions as activator, attractant and possibly aphrodisiac for unmated females. Further studies are conducted with respect to disturbance and prevention of mating behaviour of Hylotrupes bajulus in the attics of houses by using pheromone traps.
U Noldt, R Fettköther, F Schröder, H Meyer, K Dettner, W Francke, W A König


Effects of some essential oils on wood destroying organisms
1993 - IRG/WP 93-10047
Three wood destroying fungi: Botryodiplodia theobromae Pat. (stain), Gloeophyllum sepiarium (brown rot), and Pycnoporus sanguineus (white rot) were exposed to six plant essential oils: the peppermint, kaffir lime or leech lime, lavender, tarragon, holy basil, and the eucalyptus. The peppermint oil showed most effective to inhibit fungal growth, while eucalypus oil was the least effective. The other oils inhibition rate varied according to the species of fungi. In the experiment of the powder post beetles Heterobostrychus aequalis Waterh., the insects were killed within three days in the oil of tarragon, eucalyptus and holy basil, while in lavender oil they could live to ten days the same as controls. But on the contrary in the oil of peppermint and kaffir lime, some of them could even lived longer than the controls.
K Atisongkroh, C Anantachoke, P Lekuthai, S Pensook, T Kittirattrakarn


A study on biological properties of small black sawer beetle (Monochamus sotor L.)
1992 - IRG/WP 92-1525
The biological properties of the small black sawer beetle (SBSB), which is mainly destructive insect species for fire-damaged timbers in Da Xing An Ling region in China have been researched. Their main properties are: 1. The SBSB occures one generation one year in this region and their larvae overwinter in xylem. 2. The pupation starts in in late May and peak occures in early June. 3. The emergence of adults starts in early June and reach the peak in late June. 4. The oviposition peak and hatching peak are in early July and middle July respectively. 5. The average period of pupa, egg, adult and larva are 19,9, 15-30 and 250-300 days respectively.
Lu Wenda, Shao Jing Wen, Li Jian, Men Fan rong


Influence of bark damage on bluestain development in pine logs
1997 - IRG/WP 97-10197
Mechanized harvesting of conifers can lead to extensive bark damage, with the resulting wounds providing suitable entry points for bluestain fungi that are not associated with bark beetle vectors. However, the amount of bluestain colonisation can vary greatly between the different types of wound. To evaluate the effect of wound type seven different types of wounds were artificially created on freshly felled logs of Corsican pine. These ranged from barely visible punctures, to the removal of large strips of bark, simulating typical harvester damage. The logs were left in the field exposed to natural inocula of wood degrading fungi and assessed after 6 and 12 weeks. Results indicated that surface area of injury was not the best parameter for predicting the rate and extent of staining. Minor disruptions of the bark e.g. crushing and punctures, were sometimes associated with substantial amounts of stain development. Wounds with flaps of loosened but still attached bark were especially susceptible to bluestain colonization, but additional damage to exposed wood surfaces did not result in more stain. Stain development was strongly associated with the edges of wounds where the bark and exposed wood met. Excluding potential bluestain vectors such as bark beetles and weevils by enclosing the logs in netting did not markedly reduce stain, suggesting that micro-arthropods such as mites play an important part in disseminating bluestain fungi to wounds produced during harvesting and log extraction.
A Uzunovic, J F Webber, D J Dickinson


Feasibility of AE (Acoustic Emission) monitoring for the detection of the activities of wood-destroying insects
1992 - IRG/WP 92-2416
The feasibility of acoustic emission (AE) as a nondestructive testing method for the detection of the wood destroying insects was investigated. AEs were detected from the wood specimens under feeding attack of sugi bark borers or powder-post beetles. However, the feasible monitoring area of an AE sensor is influenced by the attenuation of AE amplitude, so that this could be a problem in the practical AE measurements, especially with wood specimens of higher moisture content.
Y Fujii, Y Imamura, E Shibata, M Noguchi


Influence of the peeling on the absorption in the sap displacement method
1990 - IRG/WP 3626
Results of tests on the Eucalyptus and pine fenceposts treated by sap displacement method are presented. Freshly cut post 2 m in length and 8 to 16 cm in diameter were placed for 6 days with their butt ends down in water soluble preservative solution (CCF) to a depth of about 65 cm, and these were inverted and kept in the same way for 3 days more. The treatment began a few hours after felling. The absorptions obtained in partially and totally barked fenceposts were compared. In both timber species, the barked fenceposts absorbed approximately two and a half times more preservative than the other fenceposts partially barked.
M V Baonza Merino


Use of freeze disinfection for the control of the common furniture beetle Anobium punctatum
1992 - IRG/WP 92-1528
The common furniture beetle Anobium punctatum is an extremely widespread pest of wooden objects in Danish museums. In order to develop non-chemical methods of controlling the pests, experiments were conducted to elucidate the lower lethal temperature of Anobium punctatum. The egg stage was used for the experiments as it is considered the most temperature resistant stage. Groups of Anobium punctatum eggs were exposed to temperatures of -14, -18, -22, -26 and -30°C. Freezing durations were 8 hrs, 24 hrs and 48 hrs, respectively. Preliminary results of the experiments are presented.
L Stengård Hansen


The geographical distribution of the house longhorn beetle Hylotrupes bajulus (L) Serville (Col., Cerambycidae). An attempt at a cartographical compilation of existing data
1978 - IRG/WP 176
The larvae of the house longhorn beetle belong to the most economically important pests of softwood in service in most European countries and also in some areas overseas. I have reported earlier regarding the history, the question of where the pest originally came from, and concerning attacks in earlier and recent times (1968, 1970, 1974, 1976). In this report an attempt has been made to compile cartographically the currently existing data.
H Becker


Threshold levels for dip treatments of chlorpyrifos for borer control
1995 - IRG/WP 95-10137
Chlorpyrifos has been used in non-pressure treatments of freshly sawn lumber and millwork for ten years or longer to control wood boring beetles. Since chlorpyrifos provides a quick kill of existing beetle larvae at the time of the treatment in solution concentrations as low as 0.05%, treaters tend to use less than recommended rates as a cost saving measure. However, laboratory studies conducted in the United States and Europe have shown that concentrations of 0.5% to 1.0% are needed for residual control. A review of these laboratory studies is presented in this paper.
R D Fears, J L Leca


New perspectives on the biology of the tropical powderpost beetle, Minthea rugicollis (Walk.)
1994 - IRG/WP 94-10085
Minthea rugicollis (Walk.) is one of the most important pests of seasoned hardwoods in the tropics. The species owes its ubiquity largely to its insidious development within a nutrient-filled environment and also to a strong coevolutionary specialization with its natural habitat, wood. Such an environment provides a buffer to extrinsic fluctuations and accounts for a wider range of tolerance by immature stages to variations in climatic conditions than would otherwise be possible. Aspects of culture methods, characteristic habits and external tolerances are emphasised so as to generate new perspectives in understanding the fundamental biology of this organism and to improve current wood preservation strategies.
F Abood, R J Murphy, R W Berry


Effectiveness of the new chemical wood preservative Borosol 9? against a house longhorn beetle Hylotrupes bajulus
2004 - IRG/WP 04-30355
Chemical wood preservative Borosol 9, consisting of boric acid - alkanolamine complex, is a new wood preservative with proven efficacy against wood decay fungi. However, we were interested in its efficacy against larvae of house longhorn beetle (Hylotrupes bajulus). Thus, experiment according to the EN 46 procedure was performed. Specimens made of Norway spruce wood (Picea abies) were brushed twice with 10 % Borosol 9 solution. The results showed that most of the larvae were able to tunnel into the treated specimens, but none of them were found alive after the test period of 12 weeks. On the other hand, all control untreated samples were damaged by H. bajulus larvae activity and 98 % of larvae survived. Results indicate that Borosol 9 has an efficient insecticidal activity and acts protective against wood boring insects.
G Babuder, M Petric, F Cadež, M Humar, F Pohleven


The impact of global warming on the UK distribution of house longhorn beetle Hylotrupes bajulus (L)
2001 - IRG/WP 01-10414
This paper reviews the effects of global warming on insect populations and distribution. The affects of global warming on the spread of Hylotrupes is predicted through a review of research related to the influence of temperature on its life-cycle and flight. Records of Hylotrupes distribution were obtained from published surveys, entomologists and museum collections and were plotted for the UK. The UKCIP98 model for climate change was then used to present the average maximum daily temperatures over the emergence period at present, and in the future. The model predicts a 3°C rise in annual temperature by the 2080's. This increase may enable mated females to fly on a greater number of days and over a greater area. The discussion highlights gaps in knowledge concerning the UK population that makes rate of spread difficult to predict at present.
P Oevering, A J Pitman


The WOODCARE project: Development of detection methods for Death watch beetle larvae and fungal decay
1999 - IRG/WP 99-20172
Woodcare was a European project coordinated by English Heritage. The aim of the research was to develop more targeted and more environmentally friendly treatment methods for Death watch beetle infections in Oak constructions of historical buildings. TNO has developed two new methods for fast and reliable detection of Death watch beetle larvae and related fungal decay in Oak. The problem with Death watch beetle is that the extent of the decay is difficult to judge, without destroying the wood structures. Sonic detection proved to be extremely successful in early stages of decay in laboratory samples and in wood in buildings. Furthermore, several chemical analysis methods were used to identify different stages of decay by three fungi in wood in laboratory conditions. From these methods, Pyrolysis mass spectrometry was the most promising, and was then also used on wood samples from buildings. Results of both detection methods are summarized and discussed.
P Esser, P Van Staalduinen, A C Tas


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