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An Investigation of the use and Durability of some Industrial and Domestic woods of Iran against Destructives factor in Caspian Sea
2007 - IRG/WP 07-10613
Use of domestic and commercial woods of the Caspian Sea forest fringes and evaluation of their durability against marine destructive factors were investigated. The samples of species of elm (Zelkova carpinifolia), oak (Quercus castanifolia), beech (Fagus orientalis), Maple (Acer insgin), Alder (Alnus subcordata), and horn beech (Carpinus betulus) were impregnated with CCA (Chrome–Cupper-Arsenic). Treated and untreated (natural as a control) woods have been established for 3,6, 9 and 12 months in Amirabad beach of Behshare under fishing environment. The results of observations showed that in this beach, the staining fungi and balanus were able to attack control woods or live on them. With increasing of woods maintaining in the sea, their presence became longer. The numerical results of samples weight loss showed that durability of control wood samples after one year made less than 5 % in weight losses of elm, maple, alder, and horn beech. However, control samples of oak and beech had no weight losses. The treated samples not only had no weight reduction, the absorbed salts made their weight increase. Low salinity level of Caspian Sea with respect to salinity of large sea (oceans), made absence of wood drilling worms in Caspian Sea and this may the main reason of non- destructive of wood samples.
S M Kazemi


An Investigation on Use and Durability of Some Industrial and Domestic Woods of Iran against Destructive Factors in Caspian Sea
2008 - IRG/WP 08-10636
In this study the use of domestic and commercial woods of the Caspian Sea forest fringes and evaluation of their durability against marine destructive factors were investigated. The samples of elm (Zelkova carpinifolia), oak (Quercus castanifolia), beech (Fagus orientalis), Maple (Acer insgin), Alder (Alnus subcordata), and horn beech (Carpinus betulus) species were impregnated with CCA (Chrome–Copper-Arsenic). Treated and untreated (natural as a control) woods have been established for 3, 6, 9 and 12 months in Amirabad beach of Behsharhre under fishing environment. The results of observations showed that in this beach, the staining fungi and balanus were able to attack control woods or live on them. With increasing woods maintaining in the sea, their presence became longer. The numerical results of samples weight loss showed that durability of control wood samples after one year made less than 5 % in weight losses of elm, maple, alder, and horn beech. However, control samples of oak and beech had no weight losses. The treated samples not only had no weight reduction, the absorbed salts made their weight increase. Low salinity level of Caspian Sea with respect to salinity of large sea (oceans), made absence of wood drilling worms in Caspian Sea and this may be the main reason of non- destructive wood samples.
S M Kazemi


Some studies on natural resistance of different trees and prevention of infestation by termites through use of industrial effluents at Karor, Layyah, Pakistan
2008 - IRG/WP 08-10637
The experiments were conducted to determine natural resistance/susceptibility in woods of Jaman (Syzygium cumini), Kikar (Acacia nilotica Willd.), Shisham (Dalbergia sissoo Roxb.), Poplar (Populus deltoids), Semal (Bombax ceiba) and Sufaida (Euclyptus camaldulensis) against subterranean termites’ infestation at Karor, Layyah, Pakistan. Wood stakes of these trees (30x12x3cm) were buried in soil and percentage infestation was recorded after 40, 80, 120, 160 and 200 days. Wood stakes were put inn sun drying kiln made of glass from three sides. Woods of kikar and Jaman remained free from termites’ infestation until 80 days whereas a range of 6.26 to 18.14% infestation was recorded on other woods during this period. Application of industrial effluents (textile, tannery and fertilizer) showed significant reduction in infestation percentage and weight loss in woods of Shisham, Semal, poplar and Sufaida. Woods treated with textile waste had comparatively and significantly less infestation and weight loss as compared to control wood in all cases. The possibility of application of these wastes on woods of different trees has been discussed in reference to the site of studies.
S Ahmed, M Arshad Ejaz, M Asam Riaz, A Hussain


Danish wood preservatives approval system with special focus on assessment of the environmental risks associated with industrial wood preservatives
2001 - IRG/WP 01-50166-01
The following is a description of the procedure used by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency to assess the environmental risks associated with preservatives used in the pressure impregnation of wood. The risk assessment covers issues considered to be of significance for the environment and which are adequately documented so as to allow an assessment. Such issues are persistence and mobility in soils, bioaccumulation and the impact on aquatic and terrestrial organisms. Unless required in special circumstances, the assessment does not apply to birds and mammals as the normal use of preservative treated wood is not expected to involve any noteworthy exposure of these groups. Approval of wood preservatives will be based on a general assessment of the environmental risk associated with the normal use of wood treated with the preservative in a realistic worst case situation. The assessment may address other aspects such as disposal and total life cycle.
J Larsen


In-ground performance of two formulations of chlorothalonil after five years of exposure at three test sites in Australia
1996 - IRG/WP 96-30101
Sapwood specimens of Pinus radiata D. Don and Eucalyptus regnans F. Muell. were each treated to three retentions of each of two preservative formulations (chlorothalonil in oil; chlorothalonil plus chlorpyrifos in oil) and installed in-ground at three field test sites in Australia. Specimens were treated with each formulation to achieve 3.2, 6.4 and 12.8 kg/m³ of chlorothalonil a.i. and 3.2 + 0.2, 6.4 + 0.4 and 12.8 + 0.8 kg/m³ of chlorothalonil plus chlorpyrifos a.i. For comparison, specimens of each timber species, treated to a commercial in-ground retention of a copper-chromium-arsenic (CCA) formulation, were also installed. Treated specimens (including controls) have been rated for their condition annually for attack by subterranean termites and fungal decay using a scale ranging from 4 (sound) down to 0 (failed). After five years of exposure, mean termite and decay scores for replicate test specimens at each site reveal that the performance of all three retentions of each formulation, particularly the two highest retentions, is comparable to CCA.
J W Creffield, T L Woods, N Chew


Modélisation sur maquette du rejet accidentel d'un gaz toxique et inflammable dans l'atmosphere - Emission de type "bouffée d'oxyde d'éthyléne [Water model simulation of toxic and flammable gases in the environment on industrial sites - Puff of ethylen oxide]
1990 - IRG/WP 3576
M Milhe


Selective adsorption of antisapstain actives from two aqueous suspensions, and movement of actives into wood
1996 - IRG/WP 96-30103
Green-off-saw rough sawn Pinus elliottii (slash pine) boards were dipped in aqueous suspensions of two antisapstain formulations, NeXgenâ and Busanâ Sap Stain Preventative (Busan 1009), at three product concentration levels. Concentrations of active ingredients (NeXgen: CTL (chloro-thalonil) and MTC (methylene bisthiocyanate); Busan 1009: TCMTB (2(thiocyanomethylthio)-benzothiazole) and MTC) were monitored with respect to the amount of material dipped. Selective adsorption (removal of actives from the suspension at greater than simple volumetric transfer rates) varied with formulation and active ingredient, and increased with decreasing product concentration. Movement of active ingredients into dipped boards was monitored for 30 days after dipping. Mobility order was MTC >> TCMTB > CTL. Surface depletion characteristics were obtained for each active ingredient.
M J Kennedy, T L Woods


Studies on the infestation behaviour of the powder-post beetle Lyctus brunneus (Steph.) and its physical control in the wood yards of the Caspian forests of Iran
1985 - IRG/WP 1271
Lyctus brunneus (Steph.) is a pest which has not been previously thoroughly studied in Iran. It severely attacks Iranian hardwoods, especially those used in wooden houses and that have not been treated. Research work was necessary to determine the natural resistance of the most important timber species in Iran against this insect.
P Niloufari


Environmental issues: Messages for the wood preservation industry
1985 - IRG/WP 3353
A review of the origins and structure of environmental legislation throughout those territories of the world where wood preservation is a major industry is given. The implications of media, industry and legislation interaction is discussed and suggestions made as to the key issues the wood preservation industry should concentrate its attentions on in the immediate future.
D G Anderson, P Waldie


A wood preservative for the future: Copper dimethyldithiocarbamate
1994 - IRG/WP 94-30045
The development of a new wood preservative, copper dimethyl-dithiocarbamate (CDDC) is reviewed in this paper. CDDC is formed in situ by dual pressure treatments. Laboratory and field efficacy trials, physical and chemical properties of the preservative solutions and treated wood, and plant handling characteristics of the system are examined.
D K Stokes, M H Freeman, T L Woods, R D Arsenault


A combination of chlorothalonil and chlorpyrifos for more effective wood preservation
1995 - IRG/WP 95-30067
Chlorothalonil (tetrachloroisophthalonitrile) is a highly effective fungicide and wood preservative. Chlorpyrifos (O,O-diethyl O-(3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinyl)phosphorothioate) is an insecticide and is not generally considered to possess significant antifungal activity. However, a review of the literature revealed that chlorpyrifos effects in various ways the activity of microorganisms and is even registered for control of a fungal plant disease. Laboratory and field research trials were designed to study the wood preservative effectiveness of combinations of chlorothalonil plus chlorpyrifos. In some tests the antifungal activity of the insecticide chlorpyrifos was confirmed; however in a fungus cellar test, chlorpyrifos by itself provided little protection. In laboratory termite testing, chlorothalonil was sufficiently effective that in most experiments the addition of chlorpyrifos had little effect, while in field tests the combination consistently outperforms chlorothalonil alone. In tests against various marine borer species, the combination of chlorothalonil plus chlorpyrifos proved superior to chlorothalonil alone. The synergy of chlorothalonil plus chlorpyrifos is demonstrated in field stake tests, where after eleven years in Florida the combination has given superior performance over stakes treated with pentachlorophenol or chlorothalonil alone. Chlorpyrifos alone provided little protection against decay in these field stake tests. Chlorpyrifos is a useful additive to wood preservative fungicides, conferring additional protection against both decay fungi and wood destroying insects.
T L Woods, P E Laks, T C Blewett, R D Fears


Blue-stain fungi (Ceratocystis spp.) found in Spain on pine woods
1989 - IRG/WP 1410
So far, there is only a very limited reported description of the different Ceratocystis spp. present on fresh wood in Spain. So, the main goal of this work has been the identification of species of this genus causing blue-stain on Pinus pinaster A. Ait. and Pinus sylvestris L. woods. We have also investigated the relationship between the species found and their propagation vectors (insects and wind). Finally, we have determined the growing velocity of two of the most representative species found and the presence or absence of degradative enzymatic activities.
M T De Troya, A M Navarrete


Durability of different heat treated materials from industrial processes in ground contact
2005 - IRG/WP 05-40312
In this study the durability of heat treated wood originating from four different European industrial heat treatment processes in ground contact was examined. The manufacturers of heat treated material were: PLATO Hout B.V./Netherlands, Thermo Wood/Finland, New Option Wood/France and Menz Holz/Germany where Oil-Heat treated Wood (OHT) is produced. All heat treated materials showed significantly increased durability against decay in ground contact compared to untreated Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), independent from the different heat treatment processes. After four years of field testing, heat treated material appears to be not suitable for in ground contact application, since long service life is required. In analogy to the classification of natural durability (EN 350-1, 1994), durability classes in the range from 2 (durable) to 4 (slightly durable) were achieved by the different heat treated materials. This stands in contrast to statements of suppliers, who promote their material as suitable for in ground applications.
C R Welzbacher, A O Rapp


Effects of timber surface properties and dipping conditions on uptake of antisapstain actives from two aqueous suspensions, and ultimate effects on efficacy against mould and staining organisms
1995 - IRG/WP 95-30073
Green-off-saw rough sawn Pinus elliottii (slash pine) boards were dipped in aqueous suspensions of two antisapstain formulations, and the resultant surface retentions of active ingredients MTC (methylene bisthiocyanate), CTL (chlorothalonil) or TCMTB (2(thiocyanomethylthio)benzothiazole) were monitored by chemical analysis. Surface retentions increased with suspension concentration and surface roughness, and decreased with initial timber moisture content. Dipping time beyond 20 seconds, timber basic density and earlywood content had little effect. Relatively low surface retentions, produced by dipping smoother boards with higher initial moisture contents, provided lower protection against mould and stain during seasoning than higher retentions. Equations describing the effect of surface retention on efficacy were developed for both formulations, and retentions providing complete protection under the conditions of the test were determined.
M J Kennedy, T L Woods


The use, approval and waste management of industrial wood preservatives. A preliminary report
1994 - IRG/WP 94-50033
The structure on the wood preservation through the world is heterogenous. Environmental legislation, approval policy and application practices differ in each geographical region and in individual countries. This preliminary report gives a rough estimation of the production of treated timber, the use of wood preservatives and a bief summary of environmental status of wood impregnation in selected countries.
A J Nurmi


A field test with Benzotar, an industrial residue, as a wood preservative
1985 - IRG/WP 3349
Benzotar, a residue of production of benzoic acid, was tested in field as a wood preservative. Results, after 6.5 years of exposure, showed that this product presents properties that improve the performance of wood in ground contact. This paper describes these results and presents a discussion an some aspects of its potential utilization in Brazil.
S Milano, L R Silva


The influence of formulation on the behaviour of LOSP's during industrial impregnation of spruce
1986 - IRG/WP 3387
Evidence is presented that the comparative behaviour of two LOSP formulations during impregnation treatment of spruce cannot be predicted purely on the basis of their physical characteristics (viscosity, surface tension and contact angle) nor on the extent of their 'passive' penetration into pine sapwood.
L D A Saunders, D M Zuvencko


Termite field test results of preservative treated and modified woods in Kumamoto, Japan
2001 - IRG/WP 01-30275
Various preservative treated or modified wood stakes other than CCA, were buried in the soil, maximum for six years in Kumamoto, south west side of Japan. In this area, two main termite species, Coptotermes formosanus and Reticulitermes speratus, are distributed. After two years in field, untreated sapwood of sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) were observed severe attacks by termites, but the preservative treated stakes were observed no significant attacks by termites. After six years, treated stakes with preservatives not included copper, like DDAC and zinc-naphthenate, were observed slight or moderate attacks by termites. Otherwise, in the case of treated stakes with preservatives included copper, like ACQ, copper naphthenate and Tanalith CuAz, no significant attacks by termites were observed. Few samples of chemically modified wood or LVL were observed slight attacks by termites for four years.
K Suzuki


Effect of leaching temperature and water acidity on the loss of metal elements from CCA treated timber in aquatic conditions. Part 2: Semi-industrial investigation
1995 - IRG/WP 95-50040-13
In continuation of previous leaching research on the quantification and modelling of metal elements released from CCA treated timber, a series of experiments has been carried out dealing with the influence of temperature and pH of the relative aquatic environment. The leaching method used is the Dutch prestandard for building materials, a long term static leaching test simulating practical bank-shoring situations. Parameters of study are type of fixation, wood species and specimen profiles. With decreasing water temperature, significantly less leaching of copper, chromium and arsenic is observed. An outdoors/indoors temperature ratio of 0.7 could be established. Increasing acidity of the leaching water mainly enhances the release of copper, whereas chromium and arsenic show a minimum leaching tendency at neutral pH. Both conditioning chamber fixation and steam fixation prove to be effective in fixing the metal elements in the wood substrate. With steam fixed timber, however, a higher loss of copper is observed during the early leaching cycles, due to the presence of copper salts on the wood surface. With regard to specimen profiles, boards in comparison with posts demonstrate a remarkable resistance to leaching of active ingredients, presumably due to the different heartwood/sapwood distribution and the specimen dimensions. In conclusion, the observations made confirm the results obtained from previous leaching studies. Converting the emission data into leaching fluxes, a highly correlated double logarithmic flux formula is regarded the best tool for curve fitting, however, for a limited time span. Other models which are more suitable for extrapolation of emitted quantities over a longer period of time are still under investigation. Likewise, proprotional metal ratios versus retention levels highlight the relativity of experimental data obtained with standard emission tests.
G M F Van Eetvelde, W J Homan, H Militz, M Stevens


Notes on the resistance of tropical woods against termites
1985 - IRG/WP 1249
This paper deals with a descriptive account on the effect of experimental methods, matrix, species of termites, solid wood and wood extract on the resistance and repellency of woods against three species of termites, i.e. Cryptotermes cynocephalus Light; Coptotermes curvignathus Holmgren and Reticulitermes lucifugus (Rossi). Two methods of experiment were used, the Forced Feeding Test and the Feeding Preference Test. The Feeding Preference Test method was found more appropriate for assessing the arrestancy and repellency of woods against termites. This method is probably appropriate for predicting the normal feeding behaviour of termites in the field.
Nana Supriana


Experience with an industrial scale-up for the biological purification of CCA-treated wood waste
1997 - IRG/WP 97-50095
The biological purification of CCA-treated wood waste was tested in co-operation of the BFH and the Italian impregnation plant SoFoMe. Chipped poles were infested with the chromium and arsenic tolerant brown-rot fungus Antrodia vaillantii which can transform in the laboratory ca. 90% of the chromium and arsenic into watersoluble salts. These can be leached to 100-200 ppm residual metal content. The fermentation techniques tested will be described and the fermentation success as well as the possible use of the purified material will be discussed.
H Leithoff, R-D Peek


On the Influence of Wood Destroying Fungi on the Feeding Intensity of Termites
2017 - IRG/WP 17-10893
The baiting and feeding stimulating effect of wood attacked by fungal isolates of the species Coniophora, Lentinus, Poria and Gloeophyllum on termites Reticulitermes santonensis is examined. There are significant relationships between the activity of fungal isolates and the feeding behaviour of termites. The most active isolates can be used for increase the attractiveness of wood to wood-destroying termites.
W Unger, T L Woods


Some relationship between physical characteristics and treatability of Bolivian woods
1987 - IRG/WP 3434
Using the available data on physical characteristics of 25 Bolivian woods, some relationships between porosity, specific gravity and treatability (hot and cold open tank process with 5% pentachlorophenol) were analysed. The aim of this report is to give information on technical characteristics of Bolivian hardwoods which have been studied in this country by Centro de Desarrollo Forestal and in Peru by Junta del Acuerdo de Cartagena.
A S Viscarra


Disposal of CCA treated waste wood by combustion - An industrial scale trial
1996 - IRG/WP 96-50068
Totally 272 m³ (62.7 t) of CCA treated utility poles were chipped and incinerated at Jalasjärvi Gasification Plant. In average the whole batch of chips contained 57 kg of elementary copper, 95 kg chromium and 76 kg arsenic. During the 56 h combustion trial the measured arsenic emission to the air was 76 g in total. Copper and chromium emission was less than 1 g. The condensing water from the cooling unit and the ash from the gasifier were collected and transported to Outokumpu Harjavalta Metals Oy and finally circulated through a copper refinery line.
A J Nurmi


Wood preservation in Kenya
2000 - IRG/WP 00-40191
Current research on wood preservation in Kenya is mainly on the development of biological control of wood-destroying termite species, using mycoinsecticides. The major research institutions include the Kenya Agricultural Research Institute (KARI), Kenya Forestry Research Institute (KEFRI), Moi University and the International Centre for Insect Physiology (ICIPE). Training institutions include Forestry Training College, Forest Products Training Institute and Moi University. A number of publications, mostly an biological control of termites, are available and they range from workshop and conference proceedings to theses and journal publications. Wood-destroying termite species include several genera in Macrotermitidae and one drywood termite genus. Wood preservation facilities are available in Kenya, mainly for assorted timber products, sleepers and utility poles. The major preservatives used are CCAs, PCP and Creosote oil. There are still no set standards, specifications and requirements for wood preservatives and little, if any information exists on the marketing aspects of wood preservatives. The yet to be established Industrial Chemicals Act and the recently introduced Environmental Management and Coordination Bill (1999) may be able to handle regulatory, environmental, health and safety aspects of wood preservation in Kenya.
G Ochiel


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