IRG Documents Database and Compendium


Search and Download IRG Documents:



Between and , sort by


Displaying your search results

Your search resulted in 116 documents. Displaying 25 entries per page.


Fungal and bacterial attack of CCA-treated Pinus radiata timbers from a water-cooling tower
1991 - IRG/WP 1488
Transmission electron microscopy of decaying CCA-treated Pinus radiata timbers from an industrial water cooling tower showed presence of a thick biofilm covering some areas of the wood. The biofilm contained various morphologically distinct forms of microorganisms embedded in a slime. The study provided evidence of the activity of soft rot fungi and tunnelling and erosion bacteria in wood cells. The extent of damage to wood cells due to microbial activity varied, combined fungal and bacterial attack having the most damaging impact.
A P Singh, M E Hedley, D R Page, C S Han, K Atisongkroh


Ultrastructural observations on wood-degrading erosion bacteria
1986 - IRG/WP 1283
G F Daniel, T Nilsson


Importance of bacteria in the deterioration of archaeological woods
1995 - IRG/WP 95-10122
An electron microscopic study of archaeological woods from different sites and of different ages revealed that the woods had been attacked by erosion bacteria, tunnelling bacteria and soft rot fungi. Bacterial erosion appeared to be most widespread, and was present independently as well as together with tunnelling and soft rot attacks. Thus, in many instances bacterial erosion was the only type of microbial attack present. This work recognizes the important role bacteria play generally, and erosion bacteria particularly, in the deterioration of waterlogged archaeological woods.
Yoon Soo Kim, A P Singh, T Nilsson


Decay types observed in small stakes of pine and Alstonia scholaris inserted in different types of unsterile soil
1990 - IRG/WP 1443
The attack of various wood-degrading microorganisms occurring in mini-stakes of pine and Alstonia scholaris buried in various types of unsterile soil was studied. Attacks by white rot, brown rot, soft rot, erosion bacteria, tunnelling bacteria and actinomycetes were found. Soft rot occurred in all soils, whereas attack by white rot and especially brown rot and erosion bacteria was rare. The type of soil influenced the occurrence of attack by tunnelling bacteria and actinomycetes. The former were mainly associated with horticultural soils whereas the latter were associated with soils from coniferous forests.
T Nilsson, G F Daniel


A light and electron microscopic study of decayed CCA-treated radiata pine (Pinus radiata) wood from a cooling tower
1994 - IRG/WP 94-10056
An inspection of an industrial cooling tower in New Zealand showed surface decay of 12 year old Pinus radiata wood panels treated with CCA preservative to a retention of around 15 kg/m³ of salt. Wood decay micromorphology typical of that caused by soft rot fungi, white rot fungi, 'stripy' and 'v-shaped' erosion bacteria and cavitation bacteria were all commonly seen using a light microscope (LM). Some evidence of the presence of tunnelling bacteria was also seen but was not as common. Soft rot was largely absent from the wettest regions sampled such as spray-line supports and side panels in close proximity to the spray lines, and erosion bacteria attack was the predominant type in these areas. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that unusual patterns largely consisting of troughs, depression and granulations in wood cell walls, were in most instances, almost certainly caused by erosion bacteria, but in others, tunnelling bacteria were also present. Several decay patterns seen under light microscope as matrices of fine troughs parallel and perpendicular to the cellulose microfibres were difficult to characterise in terms of previous classification but were also thought to have been caused by erosion bacteria. The distinction made by previous classification between patternms formed by erosion and cavitation bacteria needed to be questioned on the basis of observations made. Whilst the TEM showed that erosion and tunnelling bacteria were often present in close association within the wood cell walls, light microscopy suggested that, in the majority of section examined, all the types seen were clearly seperated by regions of undegraded cell wall. The observations underscore the importance of erosion bacteria in wood decay under the conditions of a cooling tower where in-service timbers are kept constantly wet by the spray from water sprinklers. Also of significance is the great diversity of decay types seen, in particular the presence of cavitation bacteria and white rot fungi has not previously been recorded for high retention CCA treated cooling tower timbers.
A P Singh, R N Wakeling, D R Page


Microbial decay of an archaeological wood
1994 - IRG/WP 94-10053
A light and transmission electron microscopic investigation of an archaeological wood was undertaken to determine the cause of its deterioration. The wood came from a bulwark constructed in early 1100 in the lake Tingstäde Träsk on the island Gotland in Sweden. The samples of the wood, which was identified as Pinus sylvestris, were taken from a depth of 0.85 m below the bottom level. The wood was found to be heavily deteriorated, and from the micromorphology of decay observed under light and transmission electron microscopes it was concluded that the wood had been largely attacked by erosion bacteria. The degradation of wood components was quite variable, some cell structures/types showing greater resistance than others. The S2 wall layer of axial tracheids, which formed the bulk of the wood, was degraded most. In comparison, ray tracheids appeared completely resistant. Other cell structures/types, such as pit borders of axial tracheids and ray parenchyma cells, displayed features that were intermediate between the extremes noted above. These features are discussed in the light of available information on bacterial erosion of wood cell walls and on chemical composition of these cell structures/types in pine wood.
A P Singh, T Nilsson, G F Daniel


Microscopic characteristics of microbial attacks of CCA-treated radiata pine wood
1993 - IRG/WP 93-10011
Light and electron microscopic observations were made of CCA-treated radiata timbers, which had been placed in service in a vineyard soil as supporting poles and as part of a house pile, to determine the cause of their deterioration. The house pile had failed in service after between 9 and 13 years and was of particular interest because decay was more severe in deeper regions than at the surface and attack was present up to 750 mm above the groundline. It was clear from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) that the predominant type of attack in the house pile was caused by erosion bacteria. The erosion patterns seen under the light microscope as troughs, pits and shallow depressions in the cell wall were almost certainly caused by erosion bacteria. However it was not entirely clear what had caused degradation patterns seen as fine channels under the light microscope. Soft rot was seen in outer regions of the post at the groundline but was very rarely seen in deeper regions. The vineyard posts had been attacked by tunnelling bacteria and soft rot. These studies demonstrated the importance of using both the light microscope and TEM in evaluating the cause of wood decay.
A P Singh, R N Wakeling


Bacteria are important degraders of cooling tower timbers: New Zealand experience
1995 - IRG/WP 95-10128
Microscopic examinations of CCA-treated Pinus radiata timbers in industrial cooling towers in New Zealand showed bacteria and soft rot fungi to be primarily responsible for the decay of these timbers. Of these micro-organisms, erosion bacteria appeared to be most widespread, attacking wood cell walls independently as well as together with tunnelling bacteria and soft rot fungi. Tunnelling bacteria attacked wood often with soft rot fungi, and less commonly with erosion bacteria. Sampling of wood from different locations in the cooling towers inspected indicated erosion bacteria to be most tolerant of oxygen limiting conditions among the microorganisms which attacked the wood, as bacterial erosion was the only type of decay present in the wood constantly saturated with water. The evidence presented of the presence of widespread bacterial attacks of industrial cooling tower timbers in New Zealand is the basis for recognising bacterial importance in the deterioration of cooling tower timbers.
A P Singh, R N Wakeling


Bacterial degradation of Pinus radiata compression wood
1996 - IRG/WP 96-10153
An inspection of twelve year old, CCA-treated Pinus radiata wood from an industrial cooling tower showed extensive surface decay of wood. Electron microscopic examination of decaying compression wood indicated that compression wood cells were attacked exclusively by bacteria, which were of erosion and tunnelling types. As compared to the normal wood, compression wood appeared to be more resistance to the bacterial attacks present. The highly lignified outer S2 wall and the middle lamellae in the compression wood tracheids were resistant to erosion bacteria, and were only occasionally attacked by tunnelling bacteria. These observations are discussed in relation to the information available on the structure and chemical composition of compression wood.
A P Singh, R N Wakeling


Ingestion of wood-degrading micro-organisms
1991 - IRG/WP 4169
An ultrastructural study was carried out on the digestive tract contents of Limnoria lignorum, frass, gallery walls and surface structures of the animals. The purpose of the study was to determine whether wood-degrading bacteria, fungi and other microbes and/or wood degraded by these microbes were present in gut regions and therefore could provide indirectly a nutritional source for Limnoria. Both bacterial (tunnelling) and fungal (soft rot) degraded wood fragments as well as lysed microbes, extracellular slime and various other microbes (actinomycetes, diatoms) were found in fore, mid and hind gut regions. The range of microbes associated with wood fragments from gut regions were similar to those recognized either colonizing or degrading surrounding gallery walls or present on the external surfaces of the organism itself. Wood materials in the gut were highly fragmented and showed evidence for either extensive bacterial or soft rot attack, or surface and sub-surface evidence for carbohydrate removal. The major wood degrading bacteria attack noted was tunnelling bacteria as well as a form capable of cell wall dissolution of pine wood. Both bacterial types carried out extensive attack of pine wood fragments present in Limnoria tunnels. Lysed fungal hyphae, and soft rot hyphae associated with residual soft rotted wood fragments were also prominent. Gut regions of Limnoria lignorum lacked a natural resident bacteria flora, although numbers of characteristic Gram-negative active vesicle producing bacteria were represented in all gut regions associated with wood fragments. In hind gut regions a prominence of wood middle lamella regions was noted suggesting that these cell wall regions were more resistant to attack. Results indicate ingestion of bacterial and fungal degraded wood and its associated microflora. It is suggested that ingestion of microbial degraded wood could provide Limnoria with increased substrate assessibility and a greater surface area over which their enzymes could act. Associated bacterial and fungal breakdown products could also provide an important supplimentary source of nitrogen.
G F Daniel, S M Cragg, T Nilsson


Bacterial degradation of wood cell wall: A review of degradation patterns
1990 - IRG/WP 1460
Information from bacterial degradation studies of 60's and 70's was reviewed by Nilsson in 1982. The application of electron microscopy to this area in recent years has provided much useful information and has eliminated earlier scepticism among workers about the ability of bacteria to degrade lignified wood cell walls. Studies using transmission electron microscopy together with those employing 14C-labelled lignins have confirmed that certain types of bacteria have a capacity to degrade intact wood, including timbers which have high lignin or extractive content and are considered naturally durable. It has not been possible thus far to isolate wood degrading bacteria in pure culture and thus their physiology and taxonomic affiliations remain unknown. Laboratory studies using mixed cultures of these organisms and observations of decaying timbers from natural environments have shown the degradation to be of three main types on the basis of microscopic appearances of degradation patterns. The three types are: cavitation, erosion and tunnelling. These patterns and bacteria which produce them during their attack of wood will be described in detail.
A P Singh, J A Butcher


Simulation and Investigation of Wood Degradation by Erosion Bacteria in Laboratory Experiments
2010 - IRG/WP 10-20431
A Microcosm experiment was successfully set up to establish, monitor and manipulate bacterial wood degradation under low oxygen conditions. Sound pine sticks were placed in waterlogged sediment from a heavily decayed pine pile foundation site in Amsterdam. The system was subject to different gassing treatment regimes in order to investigate the role of oxygen in the bacterial degradation process of wood. In different treatments, microcosm head space was aerated with air, air + O2 or N2. As a fourth treatment the air aeration was combined with a vertical water circulation through the whole Microcosm. Some Microcosms were equipped with oxygen sensors (optodes) to measure the oxygen concentration during the experiment in different depths. Wood degradation was microscopically detected and a classification for low decay intensities was developed. It was found that bacterial wood degradation occurred in all treatments detectable after 150 days. The fastest rate of decay developed in 120 days and was most intense in the water circulated treatment. The used approach was successful in simulating bacterial wood degradation under reproducible laboratory conditions. The presented set up can be used as a base for further investigations regarding optimal living conditions of and preservation strategies against erosion bacteria. Further investigations, especially long-term experiments, are necessary to understand the complex interaction of the bacterial wood degradation. Therefore, it is important to test preservation strategies in the laboratory before using it in the real environments, which will be possible with such an experimental design.
J Gelbrich, E I Kretschmar, N Lamersdorf, H Militz


Preliminary evaluation of degradation patterns in wood samples from the Yenikapı shipwrecks
2013 - IRG/WP 13-10798
The uncovering of several shipwrecks during the excavation of the Marmaray Rail Tube Tunnel Project in Istanbul provides an important opportunity to evaluate waterlogged woods buried for centuries. Identification of these woods showed that a variety of species was used in the ships. One shipwreck (a galley) from the Yenikapı Marmaray was examined using electron microscopy. The micrographs revealed a wide range in the degree of deterioration in the samples. The results confirmed earlier observations that erosion bacteria and soft rot were the main degraders of waterlogged softwoods and hardwoods.
C Köse, A M Taylor


The effect of certain wood extractives on the growth of marine micro-organisms
1977 - IRG/WP 438
S E J Furtado, E B G Jones, J D Bultman


Soft rot in CCA-treated utility poles in Sweden
1989 - IRG/WP 1398
Soft rot investigations of CCA-treated utility poles (Pinus sylvestris L.) have been conducted throughout large parts of Sweden during 1974-1985. The investigation included 179 utility poles of the State Power Board which had been used for 10-18 years in the different administrative regions from northern to southern Sweden. In addition, 193 telephone poles from the Östersund area and 218 from the Kristianstad area were studied after having been in use for 18-25 years. The soft rot fungi cause two types of attack in wood cells, namely cavities (Type I) and erosion (Type II). In this investigation, soft rot is reported only when cavities of Type I were found. Erosion (Type II) is more difficult to observe, particularly in early stages, and in addition is almost impossible to distinguish from certain other attacks of rot, such as white rot, which may have occurred during storage of the poles before impregnation. In western and central Sweden, minor attacks of soft rot were found after 10-12 years in State Power Board poles embedded in soil in arable land and meadows. Power Board poles in northern Sweden had minor attacks of soft rot after 16-18 years in arable land and also in forest land when embedded in soil. Poles used by the Telecommunications services, all embedded in stone, showed minor and only occasional attacks of soft rot at Östersund (northen Sweden), but considerably more soft rot at Kristianstad (southern Sweden). The Telecommunication poles had been in service up to seven years longer than the poles used by the State Power Board. The localization and spread of soft rot attacks in a pole can vary. There may be many reasons for this, including insufficient impregnation, leaching, etc. The soft rot attacks found in the Power Board poles are always minor and sporadic and none of the investigated poles can be said to imply any safety risk. The same applies to the Telecommunication poles at Östersund whereas those at Kristianstad demonstrated considerably more severe and more frequent attacks. The attacks of soft rot in the Telecommunication poles more frequently occurred internally, more often deeper in the sapwood than in the outermost parts.
H Friis-Hansen, H Lundström


Resistance of Alstonia scholaris vestures to degradation by tunnelling bacteria
1992 - IRG/WP 92-1547
Electron microscopic examination of vessels and fibre-tracheids in the wood of Alstonia scholaris exposed to tunnelling bacteria (TB) in a liquid culture showed degradation of all areas of the secondary wall. The highly lignified middle lamella was also degraded in advanced stages of TB attack. However, vestured pit membranes and vestures appeared to be resistant to degradation by TB even when other wall areas in Alstonia scholaris wood cells were severely degraded. The size comparison indicated vestures to be considerably smaller than TB, and we suspect that this may primarily be the reason why vestures in Alstonia scholaris wood were found to be resistant to degradation by TB.
A P Singh, T Nilsson, G F Daniel


Types of decay observed in CCA-treated pine posts in horticultural situations in New Zealand
1984 - IRG/WP 1226
The few reported failures of 11-12-year-old horticultural posts in New Zealand in 1982 were caused by brown-rot. A subsequent survey of CCA-treated posts in all the major horticultural areas has revealed decay of many posts. A microscopic examination of these posts has shown decay by brown-rot, white-rot, soft-rot and bacteria. Several types of bacterial decay have been observed.
J A Drysdale, M E Hedley


Test procedure to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of different preservatives in sea-wate
1975 - IRG/WP 414
R A Eaton


Soft rot and bacterial decay in preservative treated eucalypt power transmission poles
1982 - IRG/WP 1155
Bacterial type decay was observed in CCA and PCP treated eucalypt power transmission poles. Detailed observations made with the SEM revealed bacterial colonisation and decay, especially in fibres. Plug samples taken from poles throughout Queensland were examined for preservative retention and presence of soft-rot decay. The severity of decay was different according to location, retention and species.
L E Leightley


Microbial biofouling of 10-40% naphthalene in creosote treated and untreated wooden pilings in the marine environment
1978 - IRG/WP 442
R R Colwell, P L Fish, D A Webb, A J Emery


Contribution to study of the degradation caused in Pinus spp. poles used in field test
1989 - IRG/WP 1417
The study of the degradation produced by soil natural microflora on wood in contact with it in the field, has been going on for several years now. Our contribution to this aim in the present work has dealt with the possible relationship of the microorganisms in the soil. The microscopic visualization of wood colonization by the microorganisms, and the chemical analysis of the degraded wood compared with the undergraded.
M T De Troya, A Garcia, M J Pozuelo, A M Navarrete, A Cabanas


Observations on the failure of anti-sapstain treated timber under non-drying conditions
1990 - IRG/WP 1437
A range of bacteria and yeasts were isolated from antisapstain treated timber and fresh sawdust. Solution samples containing 100 ppm of TCMTB in a nutrient medium were inoculated with these organisms and incubated at 25°C for 5 days. The levels of TCMTB remaining in solution were determined by HPLC analysis after this time. Results indicated high losses of active ingredient for a range of organisms. These results suggest that active biodetoxification of organic biocides could occur in a short period of time during storage of antisapstain treated timber under favourable conditions. The implications of these results are discussed.
G R Williams


Ultrastructural and TEM-EDAX studies on the degradation of CCA treated radiata pine by tunnelling bacteria
1985 - IRG/WP 1260
An ultrastructural study was carried out on bacterial attacked Pinus radiata stakes treated with a high level (24.7 kg/m³) of Tanalith NCA preservative. The purpose of the investigation was to determine whether the organism possessed intracellular and/or extracellular detoxification mechanisms in order to overcome the high levels of copper, chrome and arsenic present within the wood fibre walls. Correlated T.E.M. and T.E.M.-EDAX studies showed most of the preservative elements to remain outside the bacteria associated with bacterial tunnel wall and cross-wall extracellular secretions. T.E.M.-EDAX showed the levels of preservative elements present in the tunnel walls and cross walls to often greatly exceel that recorded in neighbouring S2 cell wall regions, while studies on the bacteria showed that only copper and very low levels of chromium and arsenic had entered the cells. Observations suggested that the metals found within the cells were associated with electron-dense deposits or inclusions within the nuclear region or cell cytoplasm, the deposits often containing high levels of phosphorus and calcium together with lesser levels of other cations. The study also provided evidence for the direct visualisation of CCA preservative elements within fibre walls using T.E.M. without any form of secondary chemical enhancing, and in addition, considerable new information on the nature and structure of the single celled, Gram-negative, motile bacteria involved in the decay.
G F Daniel, T Nilsson


Short term preconditioning of preservative-treated wood in soil contact in relation to performance in field trials
2000 - IRG/WP 00-20185
The effect of pre-exposure to primary colonising micro-organisms on preservative-treated wood, prior to a basidiomycete decay test, was determined by preconditioning in two soil types. Scots pine EN 113 blocks treated with 3 model systems (a triazole, a copper quaternary compound and a copper boron triazole) were leached according to EN 84 and subjected to 6 weeks and 8 weeks burial in either John Innes no. 2 (a loam-based horticultural compost) or soil from the Simlångsdalen field site in Sweden. The samples were then tested according to the method described in EN 113. Selective isolations were also performed after soil exposure and compared with those from a longer term field trial. Preconditioning lowered the effectiveness of the 2 copper containing preservatives. Some effect of soil pre-exposure could be noted with the triazole but this was limited. The fungal isolations from preconditioned EN 113 blocks and field exposed stakes were a similar mixture of soft rot and mould fungi. Bacteria were commonly isolated from the preconditioned wood. The role of these micro-organisms in the modification of the preservatives is currently being investigated.
S Molnar, D J Dickinson


Proposed test procedure to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of a copper/chrome/arsenic preservative in seawater
1975 - IRG/WP 411
R A Eaton


Next Page