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Comparative study on physical properties of four fast growing timber species of Bangladesh
2006 - IRG/WP 06-10570
Ghoraneem (Melia azedarach), Rain tree (Albizia saman), Sissoo (Dalbergia sissoo Roxb.) and Akashmoni (Acacia auriculiformis) plantations are started as a fast growing timber specie from a few years back in Bangladesh. Initian objectives were to get fuel wood only from those trees, but a very positive response was found for Ghoraneem, Rain Tree, Sissoo and Akashmoni timber in the users market by cutting the trees and therefore maintaining its rotation period. The timber of these trees also attracted the furniture makers as well as general users due to its grain, texture, colour, availability and low-cost which helped to boost the commercial value of the species. This popularity and high demand of Ghoraneem, Rain Tree, Sissoo and Akashmoni timber in the market encouraged to carry out a comparative study on the physical properties of these fast growing species. The wood samples from three different heights for every individual test have been collected and their respective physical properties such as shrinkage, density and moisture content were examined to make a comparison. Ghoraneem, Rain Tree, Sissoo and Akashmoni trees showed significant difference in respect of tangential and radial shrinkage, respectively. Rain tree showed the lowest volumetric shrinkage (7,517%) and Akashmoni the highest (13,66%). Tangential, radial and longitudinal shrinkage didn’t differ significantly among the top, middle and bottom sections of a particular quality of wood. Density also differed significantly among the species. Sissoo showed the highest density (0.74 g/cm3) when compared to the others.
M M Islam, B K Dey, M O Hannan, G N M Ilias


Properties-enhanced albizzia particleboards by incorporating fungicide and insecticide in the glue
1994 - IRG/WP 94-30060
Preservative-treated particleboards were prepared by using tropical fast-growing albizzia and adding fungicides and insecticides to the adhesive-glue. the physical and biological properties of these boards were evaluated. No significant reduction in bending or internal-bond strength due to incorporation of the chemicals was detected. Treated particleboards effectively resisted attack by Coptotermes formosanus at an active ingredient (a.i.) retention of less than 0.5 kg/m³ for chlorpyrifos, dichlorophenthion and propetanphos in laboratory tests. Although decay was unaffected by incorporating the mixed preservative at the retention levels in this study, boards which contained IF-1000 as a fungicide an an a.i. retention of more than 1.0 kg/m³ showed the possibility of decay resistance.
B Subiyanto, S Yusuf, Y Imamura, S Fushiki, T Saito, T Katuzawa


Field performance of wood preservative systems in secondary timber species
1997 - IRG/WP 97-30152
The objective of this ongoing study is to evaluate the performance of new, potential, and standard wood preservative systems in secondary North American timber species. Eleven preservative systems were evaluated in this study - ACQ Type B, Copper Citrate 2: l, CDDC, chlorothalonil/chlorpyrifos, copper-8-quinolinolate, tebuconazole/chlorpyrifos, RH287, propiconazole/chlorpyrifos, copper naphthenate, CCA. and creosote. Field evaluations are being performed with ground contact field stakes and termite-specific testing in Hawaii, along with laboratory soil bed tests. The major wood species used with all the systems and evaluation methodologies are loblolly pine, northern red oak, tulip poplar, and cottonwood. More limited evaluations (field stakes only) are being conducted with eastern hemlock, red maple, and sweetgum. Information is presented from laboratory soil bed, field termite, and field stake evaluations. There is good correspondence between soil bed and field stake results. The more highly developed preservative systems and those in an AWPA P9 Type A oil carrier tend to perform better, and there can be a strong affect on performance from the wood species.
P E Laks, K W Gutting, R C De Groot


IRG/COIPM INTERNATIONAL MARINE TEST - to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of water-borne salt preservatives in sea-water. 2nd Interim Report
1981 - IRG/WP 477
Three reference wood species - Alstonia scholaris, Fagus sylvatica and Pinus sylvestris, untreated and treated with 3%, 6% and 10% CCA and CCB solutions were supplied to all participants for submergence at local sites. Regular examination of samples is being carried out - 6 months, 12 months and then annually for 7 years.
R A Eaton


IRG/COIPM INTERNATIONAL MARINE TEST - to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of water-borne salt preservatives in sea-water. Progress Report 10 from Naos Island, Panama
1980 - IRG/WP 462
Blocks of 3 wood species, Beech (Fagus sylvatica), Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and Alstonia (Alstonia scholaris) were exposed at site number 12 at Naos Island, Panama on March 8, 1978 by John R. DePalma. The arrangement of the panels in the exposure site is as shown in Figure 1.
D W French


IRG/COIPM INTERNATIONAL MARINE TEST - to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of water-borne salt preservatives in sea-water. Progress Report 8: Panama test results
1980 - IRG/WP 458
Summary of damage to ITRG test stakes by pholadidae and teredinidae at the Panama test site - 8 Mar. '78 to 11 Oct. '79
J R De Palma


The identification and preservative tolerance of species aggregates of Trichoderma isolated from freshly felled timber
1992 - IRG/WP 92-1553
The surface disfigurement of antisapstain treated timber by preservative-tolerant fungi remains a major problem in stored timber. Identification of a range of isolates of Trichoderma based on microscopic morphological characteristics was found to be imprecise due to the variable nature of this organism. In addition, studies to compare visual (morphological) characteristics of these isolates with their tolerance to the antisapstain compound methylene-bis-thiocyanate (MBT) using minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) tests showed no clear correlations. Isoenzyme electrophoresis was used to investigate the taxonomic relationships between species aggregates of Trichoderma isolated from antisapstain field trials and to identify physiological differences between 30 isolates of Trichoderma which show tolerance to MBT at concentrations ranging from less than 4 ppm to 34 ppm. Results indicate that there is considerable variability in the preservative tolerance of different Trichoderma isolates from particular locality. This highlights the need for field testing of an antisapstain compound in the same locality and under the same conditions in which it will be used in practice.
R J Wallace, R A Eaton, M A Carter, G R Williams


Utility, deterioration and preservation of marine timbers in India
2005 - IRG/WP 05-40314
Timber is extensively used in India in the marine environment for various purposes due to its several advantages over modern materials. Infact, its use is increasing in recent years, finding wider and wider applications and this scenario is not going to change in the near future. Though, the bio-deterioration problem is found very severe in tropical waters, still indigenous methods are widely employed for the protection of fishing craft and the present level of chemical treatment is well below 5% of total timber used. This is due to socio economic problems of the potential timber user groups, unavailability of treatment plants in the coastal areas, lack of awareness in user groups, etc. In this paper, types of fishing craft used in the country, timber uses in the marine environment, bio-deterioration losses, research conducted on bio-deterioration aspects at various places and methods applied for the protection of wooden structures are presented.
B Tarakanadha, M V Rao, M Balaji, P K Aggarwal, K S Rao


The use of C CP/MAS NMR in the chemical identification of decayed and undecayed, tropical timber species
1984 - IRG/WP 1224
13C CP/MAS NMR was found to be an extremely powerful tool for elucidating the chemical composition of Eucalyptus maculata, Pinus elliottii and Alstonia scholaris. The differences in lignin composition were different for each timber and discussed in relation to decay caused by soft-rot and white rot fungi. In particular the presence of syringyl and guaiacyl lignin types are discussed.
L E Leightley


IRG/COIPM INTERNATIONAL MARINE TEST - to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of water-borne salt preservatives in sea-water: Final report
1987 - IRG/WP 4133
Three timbers chosen as reference species were treated with 3, 6 and 10% solutions of CCA and CCB preservatives and exposed for up to 93 months at 8 tropical and temperate marine sites. Eleven local species treated in the same way were exposed at 4 of the 8 sites. There was no apparent difference in performance between CCA and CCB treated specimens. The severest test site was Panama Canal but marine borer damage of specimens was recorded at all the test sites. Treated specimens of the reference species Alstonia scholaris and Pinus sylvestris were markedly superior in performance at all sites and Homalium foetidum was considered the best local species. Along with the reference species Fagus sylvatica, treated specimens of the remaining local species performed relatively poorly. All treated species were attacked by soft rot fungi, except treated Alstonia scholaris and Homalium foetidum which were superficially decayed by bacteria. The relative success of treated Alstonia scholaris in this trial is attributed to its permeability characteristics and acceptance of high preservative loadings, even preservative distribution and its high lignin content.
R A Eaton


Estimation of service life of durable timber species by accelerated decay test and fungal cellar test
2002 - IRG/WP 02-20249
Many kinds of durable wood species for outdoor uses has been imported from all over the world to Japan. However information on the natural durability of these species is not sufficient to estimate the service life of them in the climate of Japan. Highly durable species such as Jarrh, Teak, Ipe, Ekki, Selangan batu, Red wood, Western red cedar showed no significant percent mass losses by accelerated decay test according to the JIS Z2101, but some of them are degraded during fungal cellar test for 4 years . The decay rating (0:sound to 5:totally decayed) of them after 4 years exposure was 1.0, 2.0, 0.0, 1.0, 0.0, 2.3, 5.0 respectively. This results indicated that the conventional accelerated decay test could not evaluate the natural durability of these highly durable species at all. Solid wood specimens treated with boiling water at 120? for one hour are subjected to the same JIS test, and the obtained percent mass losses of these species are 1.2, 2.9, 1.9, 3.8, 4.7, 17.5, 0.0 % by a brown rot fungus, Fomitopsis palustris, and 17.5, 14.3, 3.3, 8.2, 4.2, 0.0, 18.3 % by a white rot fungus, Trametes versicolor respectively. Pre-treatment of solid wood specimens for removal of heartwood extractives before a accelerated decay test would be an effective way to evaluate the natural durability of highly durable species in a laboratory.
K Yamamoto, I Momohara


An investigation to assess the feasibility of developing an accelerated laboratory test to determine the abrasion resistance of lesser-used timber species for use in marine constructio
2005 - IRG/WP 05-20317
The paper describes the evaluation of a laboratory-accelerated test to compare the shingle abrasion resistance of current and potential timbers for use in marine construction. Useful results were achieved in 47.5 hours, but identified a number of issues to be resolved for the test to be refined and the subsequent results to be interpreted correctly.
G S Sawyer, J R Williams


Natural durability of some commercial timbers of Sarawak, Malaysia in tropical marine environment
2005 - IRG/WP 05-10561
The abundant supply of timber resources in Sarawak makes timber an ideal choice to be used for marine construction. The natural durability of the main commercial timber species of Sarawak in ground contact is well established but the same is not available for marine environment. This study was conducted to assess the natural durability of 28 commercial timber species in tropical marine environment. Timber specimens measuring 30mm x 100mm x 300mm each suspended in metal cages were exposed at two sites to marine borer attack for a period of 12 years. Durability was assessed at six-monthly interval. The borer species found at the test sites were identified including one new borer species encountered. In addition, water quality parameters encompassing current speed, temperature, dissolved oxygen, salinity, turbidity and pH were monitored during the period. The results show that none of the species was durable with mean durability ranging from <0.5 – 3.0 years. Even Belian (Eusideroxylon zwageri) dubbed as the “iron wood of Borneo” and being the most durable timber species in Sarawak especially in ground contact and siliceous timber such as Kembang semangkok (Scaphium macropodum) has a mean durability of 3.0 and 1.2 years in marine environment, respectively. The majority of the species failed within six months. The specimens were destroyed by a combined action of teredine borers and pholad.
K Jenang, Wang Choon Ling


IRG/COIPM INTERNATIONAL MARINE TEST - to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of water-borne salt preservatives in sea-water. 3rd Interim Report
1983 - IRG/WP 4101
This paper updates the results of microbiological examination and marine borer assessment of untreated wood samples (15 x 2 x 2 cm³) and samples treated with 3, 6 and 10% CCA and CCB preservatives. Three reference species - Alstonia scholaris, Fagus sylvatica, Pinus sylvestris were used at all the test sites in addition to local species chosen by participants in the test.
R A Eaton


Natural resistance of different species of timber to marine borer attack in the Trondheimsfjord (Western Norway)
1978 - IRG/WP 435
Natural resistance of 34 timber species to marine wood-borers has been discussed, based on data collected from panels immersed in selected localities in the Trondheimsfjord during 1977-78. The wood-borers encountered on the panels were Psiloteredo megotara, Xylophaga dorsalis, Xylophaga praestans and Limnoria lignorum. The number of borers present and their growth were taken as the criterion for assessing the durability. Attack of Xylophaga was observed on all the wood species, though on timber like Irul, Wengé, Teak, Bijasal, Merbau, Vanah, Bibolo, Aniegré and Abachi, most of them did not succeed beyond making tiny pits. The first five species were totally free from Limnoria also. Attack of Psiloteredo megotara was noticed only on 14 timber species, and although destruction was slight on all except Pine and Spruce, those settled have grown to very large size. The influence of fouling organisms on natural durability of wood has been discussed. The results have been briefly compared with similar work done in other localities by various workers.
L N Santhakumaran, J A Sneli


Chemical analyses of IRG/COIPM INTERNATIONAL MARINE TEST (to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of water-borne salt preservatives in sea-water) samples
1987 - IRG/WP 4114
Chemical analysis of CCA and CCB treated timber was carried out after exposure at tropical and temperate marine sites. Results indicated that losses of all elements had occurred. In particular, losses of boron were severe. Arsenic and copper were also lost. The chromium components in both formulations was the most dominant metal remaining. The results suggest that chromium modification was important in timber treatments for the marine environment, since there appeared to be little difference in timber protection between the CCA and CCB systems.
L E Leightley


Preservation of two Indonesian timber species for marine environment purposes
1994 - IRG/WP 94-10079
This paper deal with the experiment of CCA full cell processed two non-durable Indonesian species for placed in the marine environment. 80 samples of 5 x 5 x 60 cm³ dried durian (Durio zibethinus) and mahogany (Swietenia mahagony) timber were CCA-full cell processed using 4 combination treatment of: without steaming; one hour steaming; 3% and 5% CCA solution concentration. 40 samples of them were field tested in the sea water in Rambut island beach near by Jakarta. The results shows that mahogany very difficult to treat and not recommended to be placed in marine environment, while CCA retention in durian timber could reach 29.91 kg/m³ and meet the requirement of retention for timber to be placed in marine environment. After two month field test in sea water full cell processed drian with 5% CCA solutin concentration could prevent marine borers attack.
P Permadi, I M Padlinurjaji, F Rasmita


Standardisation of sapstain tests - A challenge
1992 - IRG/WP 92-2403
In the last decade many new anti-sapstain products have been tested world-wide under laboratory and field conditions. Several extensive test programmes have been executed with different non-standardized test methods and procedures, with the result that the biological findings cannot be compared with each other. In this paper, gathered recommendations will be given in order to standardize test methods. These recommendations are based on questionnaires which have been sent to institutes throughout the world. For the realization of such a (standarized) test methodology, co-operation between test institutes, industry and working groups is necessary. This co-operation might also be useful for improving the treatment and application methods in the field. Standardization of sapstain methods is a challenge for Working Group II.
G Rustenburg, C J Klaver


Timber infesting species of Col. Lyctidae and Bostrichidae imported into Germany since ca. 1985
2000 - IRG/WP 00-10385
This contribution to the knowledge of passively and unintendedly dispersed species of Col. Bostrichoidea has been derived from the author&apos;s private investigation in cooperation with German quarantaine institutions from 1996 to 1999. It is a brief summing-up of the importations of timber infesting "Powder-post Beetles" (Col. Lyctidae) and "Borer Beetles" (Bostrichoidae) into a European industrial country at the end of the century. Altogether 26 (Lyctidae: 9; Bostrichoidae: 17) species of Col. Bostrichoidae are recorded as imported into Germany during the last one and a half decade of the century. The foreign species of several samplings sent for identification are compiled in an annotated list of species together with the imported species published in miscellaneous articles of various journals since ca. 1985. All the species of the living samples and most of the finds published by other authors are determined or prooved by the author of this paper. The article is dedicated to the memory of Dr. h.c. Siegfried Cymorek, the outstandingly initiative German specialist of timber insects, particularly of Col. Bostrichoidae, and the leading member of DESOWAG, Krefeld, who in 1987 passed away in the zenith of his creative work.
K U Geis


A technique for determinging the efficacy of wood preservatives for partially treated timber
1988 - IRG/WP 2322
A technique is described for determining the efficacy of wood preservatives either for certain wood species where a full penetration cannot be achieved by normal vacuum-pressure methods or for more permeable species to look at efficacy of treated zone in preventing decay of an untreated core. Both sapwood and heartwood planks of spruce (Picea abies) and pine (Pinus sylvestris) were treated by CCA using different treatment schedules. After a preservative fixation period the planks were cross-cut into small blocks, end sealed with flexible epoxy resin and conditioned in a constant climate room. The preservative penetration was measured from each individual block and the retention by analysing replicate blocks from each individual plank. The test method used was a modified EN 113 with Coniophora puteana and Poria placenta as the test fungi. Series of replicate blocks were harvested after 9, 16 and 26 weeks. No significant decay was found in treated blocks, but untreated controls showed weight losses comparatable with previous results with the conventional EN 113 method. Further development work is still needed, but it is considered that the present method has potential for the approval of preservatives and treatments for refractory species.
A J Nurmi


Marine exposure assessment of the natural resistance of a number of lesser known species of tropical hardwoods to teredinid and limnoriid borers
2004 - IRG/WP 04-10520
Naturally durable species of timber are used as an alternative to preservative treated timber for marine structures, but many species have not been evaluated for their potential for use in this environment. EN 275 specifies a 5-year test period - too long a period for screening tests to be economically viable. In this study, candidate timber species were selected for testing in the sea on the basis of their resistance to limnoriid attack determined in previous laboratory trials. Comparative resistance to teredinids was assessed by comparing the rate of deterioration observed in candidate species of lesser known hardwoods against that for greenheart and ekki, species of timber that have a proven track record for marine construction. Scots pine sapwood was used for comparison, as a non-durable timber. At the site selected, rapid deterioration of Scots pine specimens due to teredinids and to Limnoria tripunctata occurred. Acaria quara, cumaru and uchi torrado (respectively Minquartia guianensis, Dipteryx excelsa and Sacoglottis guianensis) were not attacked over the six month exposure period, whereas slight teredinid attack was detected in ekki and greenheart.
J R Williams, S M Cragg, L M S Borges, J D Icely


IRG/COIPM INTERNATIONAL MARINE TEST - to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of water-borne salt preservatives in sea-water. Progress Report 1: Treatment of reference samples
1977 - IRG/WP 426
It was agreed in Wildhaus on 15 May 1976 that preparations for the test detailed in Document No: IRG/WP/414 should commence immediately, but that initially only two water-borne preservatives should be used - a copper/chrome/arsenic (CCA) and a copper/chrome/boron (CCB) formulation respectively. PRL, England (R Cockcroft) would be responsible for supplying samples of the reference timbers treated with CCA and Dr Wolman GmbH, Federal Republic of Germany (W O Schulz) for supplying samples of the reference timbers treated with CCB. Untreated samples of the reference timbers would be supplied at the same time. Samples of the two wood preservatives have been kindly supplied for the test by Hickson&apos;s Timber Products Ltd, UK and Dr Wolman GmbH.
R Cockcroft, T B Dearling, W O Schulz, H V Borck


Penetration of surface applied deltamethrin micro-emulsion formulations in four European timber species
1994 - IRG/WP 94-20030
The Netherland&apos;s Government, in line with many other European Governments initiated a programme (KWS2000) aimed at significantly reducing the emission of volatile organic compounds by the year 2000. As part of this programme a research project is currently underway to evaluate the potential for replacing organic solvent based remedial treatments with micro-emulsion formulations of the same or enhanced insecticidal activity. To date the project has evaluated the penetration of a deltamethrin micro-emulsion formulation in four species, notably, Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) sapwood and heartwood, Norway spruce (Picea abies) heartwood, Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) heartwood and European oak (Quercus petraea) heartwood. The test method used, an adapted version of the German standard DIN 52 162, subsequent a.i. distribution analyses and results are discussed.
P Esser, W L D Suitela, A J Pendlebury


Termite Field Tests of Various Timber Species Treated with permethrin using supercritical carbon dioxide
2005 - IRG/WP 05-10560
Termite field tests were conducted on permethrin-treated Eucalyptus obliqua heartwood, Pinus radiata sapwood and P. radiata LVL. The permethrin was impregnated using either supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) or light organic solvent preservative (LOSP) systems. Comparative permethrin retentions were most accurately achieved in P. radiata sapwood, where no difference between impregnation systems was found in performance against Coptotermes acinaciformis, and a minor difference in favour of scCO2 was found against Mastotermes darwiniensis. P. radiata LVL specimens treated using scCO2 performed slightly better than those impregnated with LOSP, reflecting slightly higher permethrin uptakes in the former. E. obliqua heartwood was completely destroyed by M. darwiniensis when impregnated with LOSP but was mostly sound when scCO2 was used, suggesting improved uniformity of penetration by the latter treatment.
A Qader, L J Cookson, J W Creffield, D Scown


The natural durability assessments of secondary timber species - field trials
1998 - IRG/WP 98-10297
Secondary or &apos;alternative&apos; hardwood timber species can replace traditional hardwoods and contribute significantly to satisfying the overall demand for hardwoods in the UK timber market. A selection of these &apos;alternative&apos; hardwoods is currently being tested at BRE-WTC for natural durability both in ground contact (to EN252) at two field sites, and out of ground contact (as L-joints to EN330) at one site. The objective is to provide an assessment of the suitability of each species for future commercial application. Moisture movement has been monitored in the L-joint tenons showing in less durable timbers, such as rubberwood (Hevea brasiliensis), rapid in-depth wetting during rain. Other monitored features of timber failure in out-of-ground exposure, including surface mould, cracking, discoloration and rot, indicate to date clear species-based differences. Comparison of the test timbers, based upon responsiveness to moisture and degree of timber failure, classify calophyllum (Calophyllum spp.), Ghanaian teak (Tectona grandis) and niové (Staudtia stipitata) as most durable and least reactive to moisture. The results to date of the ground contact trials, when compared with archived durability data show that the archive records of ground contact natural durability remain valid, although some modern plantation-grown timbers, such as teak (Tectona grandis), appear less durable than material from virgin forest. The likely value and commercial application of some of the secondary hardwood timbers examined is summarised.
E D Suttie, R J Orsler


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