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Performance of sintered glass screening as a potential physical barrier against subterranean termites in the laboratory and after 4 years of field test
2008 - IRG/WP 08-10646
This paper describes the performance of sintered glass screenings as a potential physical barrier against the subterranean termites, Coptotermes acinaciformis and Mastotermes darwiniensis in the laboratory and after four years of field testing in active above-ground mound colonies of Coptotermes lacteus. The laboratory results suggest that sintered glass is a viable control option against Coptotermes species in Australia, particularly against the subterranean termites C. acinaciformis and C. lacteus. There was a marked difference between the C. acinaciformis and M. darwiniensis termites’ ability to tunnel the sintered glass physical barriers in the laboratory bioassays. After 8 weeks of laboratory bioassay, the result suggested that C. acinaciformis was not able to tunnel through the sintered glass physical barrier, while M. darwiniensis tunnelled through the barrier within less than 48 hours. These laboratory and field results indicated that the sintered glass physical barrier can protect structural timbers from attack and damage by subterranean termites.
J R J French, B M Ahmed (Shiday)


Stress wave and visual analysis of treated and non treated fence posts after 15 years in field test
2010 - IRG/WP 10-20449
Wood preservation may play an important role in protecting tropical rain forest. Basically, it can reduce pressure on natural resources by increasing wood durability. Field tests are conducted to simulate final use of woods under different environmental conditions. Visual analysis, non destructive testing, and non destructive evaluation techniques were applied to assess wood resistance and chemical preservative efficiency. In Brazil visual analysis is frequently applied in field tests while NDE (Non Destructive Evaluation) techniques have been very little used. We assessed the sound level of treated and non treated wooden fence posts after 15 years in field tests using stress wave and visual analysis techniques. We studied the following wood species: Eucalyptus saligna, Eucalyptus grandis, Pinus elliottii and Sclerolobium paniculatum. Additionally, two non-vacuum/pressure and one vacuum/pressure methods were used to impregnate the fence posts. Creosote, CCA, a mixture of creosote and used motor oil, and a formulation based on fluor chrome arsenate phenol were the chemicals applied. For each wood specie/chemical a combination of 10 samples was treated and other 10 samples for each wood species were used as control. The visual analysis and non destructive evaluation techniques were conducted according to the criteria proposed by the IUFRO. The stress wave timer Metriguard model 239A equipment was also used. These research results showed that the non-destructive analysis method using the stress wave timer device was an efficient alternative to rapidly measure sound level of the wooden fence posts in field test. The average velocity of wave propagation acquired by the stress wave timer was lower in decayed woods compared to sound ones. Also the average velocity of the wave propagation through the buried portion was lower than through the above ground portion of the wooden fence posts. The visual analysis and stress wave timer showed a good relationship as alternative approach to assess sound level of the fence posts in field test.
A Florian da Costa, R Faustino Teles, J Costa Gonçalves


A comparison of soft rot, white rot and brown rot in CCA, CCP, CCF, CCB, TCMTB and benzalkonium chloride treated Pinus radiata IUFRO stakes, after 9-15 years exposure at five test sites in New Zealand
1991 - IRG/WP 1485
The aim of this study was to determine if decay type varies significantly between five field trial test sites of different soil type, aspect and climate in 9-15 year old, replicate CCA, CCF, CCP. CCB, TCMTB and AAC treated IUFRO stakes. A visual on-site assessment of decay type on every test stake was made and observations confirmed by microscopical examination. Regression analyses were used to determine significant differences of percentage frequency of occurrence of each rot type between sites and preservatives. Large differences in percentage frequency of occurrence of rot type were evident between sites. One site was dominated by brown rot (85%) and two were dominated by soft rot (99 and 91%). The fourth site had intermediate proportions of brown rot (40%) and soft rot (71%) but had the second highest occurrence of white rot (32%) (highest = 37%; lowest = 11%). The fifth site was distinct in that a large proportion of stakes (69%) had both well established brown rot and soft rot. Stakes at the other four sites tended to have only one rot type. Some highly significant preservative effects were also found. Possible causes of these differences are discussed in terms of inter-site soil type, climate and other differences.
R N Wakeling


Field test evaluation of preservatives and treatment methods for fence posts
1985 - IRG/WP 3347
This work presents the field test results after fifteen years exposure of Eucalyptus saligna fence posts treated with six different preservatives and five treatment methods. All the combinations with oil-borne preservatives presented the best results and among the waterborne preservatives, the fence posts treated by immersion method were with the lowest performance in the field test.
G A C Lopez, E S Lepage


Performance of treated fence posts after 6 years in five test plots in the State of Sao Paulo - Brazil
1976 - IRG/WP 376
Fence posts treated with creosote, pentachlorophenol and creosote/ pentachlorophenol mixtures showed good performance after 6 years of exposure in five test plots located in the State of Sao Paulo - Brazil. Good results were also achieved with copper sulphate/sodium arsenate and copper sulphate/potassium dichromate mixtures. Fungi and termites were the main destroying agents found attacking the posts.
M S Cavalcante


Japan's comments on ISO/DIS 12583-1/2
1996 - IRG/WP 96-20100
The paper describes an accelerated field test for the evaluation of timber preservative formulations against subterranean termites. The method has been adopted by the South African wood preservation industry as a screening method for the approval of wood preservatives for use under SA conditions. The method which is based upon the fungal cellar test offers a rapid means of evaluating the comparative performance of new wood preservative formulations in an environment that accurately reflects field conditions.
P Turner, D Conradie


Evaluation of new creosote formulations after extended exposures in fungal cellar tests and field plot tests
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30228
Although creosote, or coal tar creosote, has been the choice of preservative treatment for the railroad industry since the 1920s, exuding or "bleeding" on the surface of creosote-treated products has been one incentive for further enhancements in creosote production and utility (Crawford et al., 2000). To minimize this exuding problem, laboratories such as Koppers Industries Inc., USA, and Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Division of Chemical and Wood Technology, Melbourne, Australia, have developed changes in processing of coal tar that produce distillates with fewer contaminants. This "clean distillate" is then used to formulate "clean creosote" as a preservative. These new, unique creosote formulations are being investigated as part of a program to enhance the use of regionally important wood species in the United States. Four retention levels of each of two new creosote formulations creosote, one pigment-emulsified creosote (PEC) and one creosote formulation that meets the AWPA Standard C2-95 for P1/P13 creosote (AWPA, 1995a), were applied to two softwood species and two hardwood species. Two laboratory procedures, the soil-block and fungal cellar tests (accelerated field simulator), were used to evaluate the four creosote formulations. These procedures characterized the effectiveness of the wood preservatives. The soil-block tests were used to determine the minimum threshold level of the preservative necessary to inhibit decay by pure cultures of decay fungi. In general, the soil block tests showed there was little difference in the ability of the four creosote formulations to prevent decay at the three highest retention levels as summarized in a previous report by Crawford and DeGroot (1996). The soil-block tests will not be discussed in this report. Fungal cellar tests expose treated wood to mixtures of soil-borne fungi that promote accelerated attack. Crawford and DeGroot (1996) discussed the evaluation of the creosote formulations after 17 months of exposure in the USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory (FPL), fungal cellar. At that point in time data from the fungal cellar tests showed that softwoods are protected better than hardwoods for all four formulations of creosote tested. This report will discuss exposure of the fungal cellar stakes upto 36 months. In addition, field stake tests are being used to verify service life of the new creosote formulations in vivo. Results from accelerated tests are indicative of field performance, but the correlation between laboratory and field results is still being investigated. Field stake tests are regarded as critical, long-term evaluations that provide results most directly related to the performance of treated products in service. In this study, we report on the performance of the creosote formulations after five years of exposure in field tests.
D M Crawford, P K Lebow, R C De Groot


Protocol for evaluation and approving new wood preservative
1985 - IRG/WP 2159
M E Hedley, J A Butcher


Inspection results of preservative treated stakes, maximum 33 years in field
1992 - IRG/WP 92-3690
Since in 1958, we have undertaken field experiments in Japan. For these field experiments, we used sapwoods of Japanese cedar called Sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) because of majority of plantation forest soft wood species in Japan. For some preservatives, we added sapwood of Japanese beech called Buna (Fagus crenata), a main Japanese hard wood species. Dimensions of these specimens were 30 x 30 x 600 mm³ (T x R x L). About 30 preservatives mainly water born but 20% of oil born preservatives included, were examined for this test. We checked the damage rating every year by the observation. The service life of the preservative treated stakes were estimated at the period when the average damage rating of stakes were reached beyond 2.5 . Creosote oil, creosote oil mixed heavy oil (75:25 and 50:50) and creosote oil mixed coal tar (75:25 and 50:50) are still sound conditions for 33 years. CCA (JIS K 1554 Type 1) 2% and Tancas C 2% are still sound conditions for 28 years. Because of soft rot, the treated Buna specimens were shorten as ones of treated Sugi.
K Suzuki, K Yamamoto, M Inoue, S Matsuoka


In-ground performance of two formulations of chlorothalonil after five years of exposure at three test sites in Australia
1996 - IRG/WP 96-30101
Sapwood specimens of Pinus radiata D. Don and Eucalyptus regnans F. Muell. were each treated to three retentions of each of two preservative formulations (chlorothalonil in oil; chlorothalonil plus chlorpyrifos in oil) and installed in-ground at three field test sites in Australia. Specimens were treated with each formulation to achieve 3.2, 6.4 and 12.8 kg/m³ of chlorothalonil a.i. and 3.2 + 0.2, 6.4 + 0.4 and 12.8 + 0.8 kg/m³ of chlorothalonil plus chlorpyrifos a.i. For comparison, specimens of each timber species, treated to a commercial in-ground retention of a copper-chromium-arsenic (CCA) formulation, were also installed. Treated specimens (including controls) have been rated for their condition annually for attack by subterranean termites and fungal decay using a scale ranging from 4 (sound) down to 0 (failed). After five years of exposure, mean termite and decay scores for replicate test specimens at each site reveal that the performance of all three retentions of each formulation, particularly the two highest retentions, is comparable to CCA.
J W Creffield, T L Woods, N Chew


An in-ground natural durability field test of Australian timbers and exotic reference species. Part 2: Progress report after approximately 13 years' exposure
1983 - IRG/WP 1189
The condition of heartwood specimens of Australian and exotic timber species after approximately 13 years' in-ground exposure is given. Four of the 5 test sites have a termite hazard in addition to the hazard from a range of decay fungi. Values for specimen life are given only where all replicates of a timber species have become unserviceable. Results give evidence leading to doubt about the accuracy of the tentative durability ratings previously ascribed to at least some of the species under test.
J D Thornton, G C Johnson, I W Saunders


Co-operative Field Experiment: Performance of preservative-treated timber: Report on condition of specimens after seven years installed in New South Wales - Australia
1986 - IRG/WP 3362
R S Johnstone


Copper naphthenate-treated Southern Pine pole stubs in field exposure. -Part 2: Chemical characterization of full size pole stubs 12 years after treatment
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30246
This study examines the influence of pre-treatment and post-treatment steaming on the character and physio-chemical nature of copper naphthenate in hydrocarbon solvent treated pine in larger, pole diameter, pole stub-length samples. This work is the continuation of two projects that began almost a decade ago. Previous reports indicated that certain morphological changes might occur in small laboratory steamed samples of copper naphthenate treated southern pine. Toluene-methanol extraction, UV-Vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) were used to investigate the nature and properties of the copper naphthenate present in the wood after 12 years of exposure. The formation of solid cuprous oxide occurred regardless of pre- or post-steaming conditioning.
H M Barnes, D P Kamdem, M H Freeman


Seasonal effects of the field evaluation on wood preservatives against mold fungi
1996 - IRG/WP 96-20087
For the purpose of the amelioration of field test methods, commercial preservatives against mold fungi were tested under two different seasons, in winter and in summer. The specimens were bundled and set over the water bath and all these systems were covered with plastic film. At top of the system under film, black films for regeneration of sunlight were put in, and windows for changing air were reserved in summer. The visual evaluation of damage (rating 0-4) was done periodically. The results obtained as follows. 1.) The evaluation values after 2 months in winter were simmilar results as those after 3 weeks in summer. 2.) The fungicides, mixture of nitoril compound and organo nitrogen sulfuric compound, mixture of thiocyanate compound and organo nitrogen sulfuric compound, were obtained good results in field. Those percentage of the specimens rating under 1 were more than 50% and those mean rating were not more than 2. 3.) In the case of organo iodide compound, the results in winter were good but in summer were not so good.
K Suzuki, Y Sugai, K Ryugo, D Watanabe


Evaluation by experimentation on site of a new method for termite control
1996 - IRG/WP 96-10173
A new concept of subterranean termite control consists of the installation of toxic baits in or around the infested construction. Dow Elanco has developed a bait system based on Hexaflumuron. This active ingredient is an insect growth regulator with slow acting effect. A lot of trials were conducted in the USA, but none in France until now. We realised on site experiments, in order to estimate the efficacy of this bait system against French termites. 3 on site experiments (field trial, private house, building) and the first results are described.
A-M Pruvost, M-M Serment, M Jéquel


Report on the questionnaire sent out to IRG Members for the creation of a new Sub-group 4 "evaluation of superficial treatments for preventive action against basidiomycetes"
1992 - IRG/WP 92-2417
On Thuesday May 12th, 1992 a subgroup meeting was held between 16.00-17.00 h. About 50 people attended this meeting. The results of the questionnaire sent out last year to the IRG members, was discussed. The analysis as well as the practical conclussions of the discussions are retained in this document.
A R Valcke


Field Test Results after Nine Years for CCA and ACQ Preservative-treated Wood Fixed in Different Climates
2003 - IRG/WP 03-30303
During assessment of the ground contact stakes in the Norwegian test field, we have frequently found that the first visual rot attack is in the zone of the stakes, where the stakes have been in contact with each other during the fixation. These parts are usually light green, caused by the lack of light during fixation, compared to the rest of the stake surface, which has a darker colour. To investigate if light on the stakes during fixation can affect the durability of the treated wood, we started a test in 1993. CCA and ACQ treated stakes were tested according to EN 252. The stakes were treated with two retentions of each salt. One according to the Nordic Class A (for ground contact i.e. hazard class 4) and one lower retention (25 % of the class A retention. This is even lower than the Nordic class AB (HC 3) retention). Before exposure they were fixed in 7 different climates: 1) Normal fixation = 60 % RH and 25 °C, light days, dark nights for 7 days, 2) Dark fixation = normal fixation without light for 7 days, 3) UV-light fixation = normal fixation with UV-light 24 hours for 7 days, 4) Hot fixation = 95 % RH and 90 °C for 2 hours, 5) Cold fixation = 50 % RH and 10 °C for 30 days, 6) Dry fixation = 10 % RH and 50 °C, for 24 hours, 7) Wrapped fixation = each stake packed in black plastic foil, 50 °C and without light for 24 hours. The colour of the ACQ stakes varied from light green to black, depending on the fixation climates. These different colours and the durability results after 5 years were reported at the 30th IRG meeting in 1999. The different fixation procedures give only small differences in durability/rot index after 9 years in field test. Hot, dry and wrapped fixations give ACQ a better durability than CCA in the Nordic class A retention. None of the ACQ stakes were rejected in the first 9 years, while the CCA stakes had a few rejected stakes after 8 and 9 years caused by sot-rot. For the low retention, ACQ gives a better durability than CCA for all fixation procedure, but both preservatives had several rejected stakes.
F G Evans


Health and safety aspects of the use of wood preservatives. Preliminary evaluation of the answers to the IRG-Questionnaire on the state of pollution control in the field of wood preservation
1974 - IRG/WP 56
This preliminary evaluation of the answers to the IRG/WP-Questionnaire only gives a general survey on those questionnaires, which the author received until June 13, 1974. Details, such as correlations between importance of wood preservation and pollution control, could not be considered due to lack of time. For the same reason it was not possible so far, to evaluate the additional remarks given in seperate letters. In the case, where several questionnaires have been returned for one country, the respective answers were compared. If answers differed within one country, those were considered, which seemed to be most applicable. Obvious errors were omitted.
H Willeitner


2nd IRGWP - Questionnaire on the state of pollution control in the field of wood preservation (Introductory letter)
1981 - IRG/WP 3184
H Willeitner


2nd IRGWP - Questionnaire on the state of pollution control in the field of wood preservation
1981 - IRG/WP 3185
H Willeitner


Laboratory and field evaluation of Plasmite Reticulation System using bifenthrin as a chemical barrier within wall cavities against subterranean termites.
2005 - IRG/WP 05-20307
Laboratory and field bioassays undertaken to demonstrate Plasmite Reticulation system effectively delivers the termiticide (bifenthrin) within a simulated wall cavity at the required concentration. The chemical assay indicated that the amount of bifenthrin sampled at 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25m along the simulated reticulation system tested (30m) exceeded the manufacturer’s minimum recommendation of 0.0044%m/m. Results of the laboratory bioassay, using Coptotermes acinaciformis, indicated that the concentrations of bifenthrin present in the soil core samples at 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25m were extremely toxic and prevented termite penetration of bifenthrin treated soil in laboratory bioassays immediately after field soil treatment. No penetration of any soil core samples was observed in the field test against Coptotermes lacteus.
J R J French, B M Ahmed, J Thorpe, A Anderson


Effect of felling time related to lunar calendar on the durability of wood and bamboo -Fungal degradation during above ground exposure test for 2 years- (Preliminary report)
2005 - IRG/WP 05-20311
Current study was carried out to know whether the felling time of trees and bamboos based on lunar calendar affects natural durability of felled wood-bamboo or not. Each of one sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) tree of 28 years old and one Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla) of around 3 years old was cut 12 times between February and December in 2003. Six sets of sugi tree and bamboo were felled in a day during “Hassen” period and the other 6 sets of them were also felled in a nearby non-“Hassen” day. There is a belief that “Hassen” should be avoided to perform destructive works such as cutting trees. “Hassen” lasting 12 days based on lunar calendar appears 6 times every year. After felling sample trees and bamboos, these specimens were subject to outdoor exposure at above ground level for 2 years. Properties of specimens such as moisture contents, mould and fungal resistance were examined periodically for 2 years. There was no clear difference in the degree of mould growth on the surface between specimens felled in a “Hassen” day and those felled in a non-“Hassen” day in the same month. The felling seasons, however, influenced the growth of mould on the surface of wood and bamboo clearly, which has been traditionally known in many cases. Fungal degradation evaluated by visual observation and the depth of pin penetration using Pilodyn during 2 years exposure was not affected by not only “Hassen” or non-“Hassen” also seasons when tree and bamboo felled.
K Yamamoto, S Uesugi, K Kawakami


Evaluation of termiticides in field trials
1990 - IRG/WP 3633
Termiticide-treated posts and stakes have been tested at the field test site in Kagoshima, Southern Kyushu, Japan. Various commercial and alternative termiticides have been evaluated annually as TAI (termite attack index), calculated by the equation: TAI = R x P, where R is the mean of attack rating of 0 (sound), 10 (sign of tasting), 30 (slight attack), 50 (moderate attack), 100 (severe attack), and P is the ratio of attacked posts (stakes) to total posts (stakes) tested, expressed as 0.0-1.0 . CCA-impregnated Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) posts have well performed keeping 0 TAI over nine years. AAC-treated pine (Pinus radiata) stakes with 9.3 kg/m³ DDAC (didecyldimethyl ammonium chloride) or 9.4 kg/m³ BTAC (methylalkylbenzyltrimethyl ammonium chloride) have been free from decay, but they yielded 34 or 42 TAI after eight years. Improvement of termite resistance was revealed by addition of cupric chloride or cuprammonium chloride. Brushing treatment of pine (Pinus densiflora) stakes, with 200 g/m chlordane (2.0%), chlorpyrifos (1.0%) or tetrachlorvinfos (1.0%) solutions, did not provide the perfect control for five years, yielding 30, 42 and 48 TAI, respectively.
M Takahashi, Y Imamura, K Tsunoda, A Adachi, K Nishimoto


In-ground evaluation of a copper azole wood preservative (Tanalithâ E) at a tropical Australian test site
1996 - IRG/WP 96-30100
A field trial to determine the in-ground termite and decay resistance of Pinus radiata D. Don impregnated with a copper azole formulation, TANALITHâ E, has been established at a tropical site in the Northern Territory of Australia. Four retentions of TANALITHâ E, containing 1.54, 2.08, 2.92 and 4.30 kg/m³ of Cu, are being evaluated. For comparison, Pinus radiata specimens treated to two retentions (0.56 and 1.18 kg/m³ of Cu) of the benchmark CCA preservative TANALITHâ C, have also been included in the test. Treated specimens (including controls) have been assessed for degrade by subterranean termites and fungal decay, after 4, 7, 16 and 27 months of exposure, using a scale ranging from 4 (sound) down to 0 (failed). Over the duration of the trial, specimens have been contacted by the economically important species of termites Mastotermes darwiniensis Froggatt, Coptotermes acinaciformis (Froggatt), Schedorhinotermes spp. and Heterotermes spp. After 27 months of exposure, the mean termite and decay scores for replicate test specimens indicate that the performance of TANALITH â E is comparable to CCA.
J W Creffield, J A Drysdale, N Chew


An in-ground natural durability field test of Australian timbers and exotic reference species. Part 5: Extensive data from a site where both decay and termites are active. Results from a full-replicated set of heartwood specimens from each of ten myrtaceous hardwoods after 18, 19 and 20 years' exposure - A discussion paper
1988 - IRG/WP 2324
Extensive data are presented on the decay situation, the termite situation and the decay-termite associations; all gathered from a fully-replicated set of heartwood specimens of 10 hardwood timbers after 18, 19 and 20 years' exposure in the ground at a single test site, i.e. a semi-arid steppe site. Sixteen tables are presented in addition to the one table providing the rating data; the latter representation of specimen condition being essentially all the data normally being recorded from field tests, whether these be of natural durability or preservative treated specimens. The authors give this "extra" data to show the type of information obtainable as a result of applying both mycological and entomological expertise to field assessments. Instead of discussing these results. the authors wish to generate some discussion by asking questions such as - is some of all of this information of value? - What additional/alternative information would interested scientists wish to see with respect to the most durable timbers in a test such as that examined in this report?
J D Thornton, G C Johnson, J W Creffield


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