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Radio frequency heating times for sterilization radiata pine solid piles
2017 - IRG/WP 17-40815
In this work was sterilized wood packaging material of radiata pine, stacked as solid piles without stickers, for determining the heating times using radiofrequency treatment. The experiments were performed in a radio frequency semi-industrial equipment. The results showed that the radio frequency heating times increases with wood volume and that radio frequency treatments were faster than conventional vapour heat treatment.
H Esquivel, V Sepúlveda, J Torres, L Salvo, R A Ananías


Eradication of wood decay fungi by means of radio frequency
1998 - IRG/WP 98-10292
High frequency electromagnetic fields i.e. radio frequency (RF) are used in wood industry for heating, gluing and bending of wood and are also appropriate for eradicating of wood decay fungi and insects. We investigated the effects of RF exposure on wood samples which were in vitro infected by Coniophora puteana, Gloeophyllum trabeum and Lentinus lepideus. For each fungus, the lethal temperature and time of exposure were determined. The efficacy of RF treatment was visually evaluated from regeneration of mycelia by subsequent exposure of treated wood samples on growth media. The eradication was dependent on the fungus species, temperature and duration of exposure to RF of 4.75 MHz. The most sensitive was Coniophora puteana (destroyed in 4 minutes at 75°C), less sensitive Lentinus lepideus (in 10 minutes at 90°C) and the least, Gloeophyllum trabeum (in 12 minutes at 90°C). At low temperatures, the time of exposure had to be adequately longer.
F Pohleven, J Resnik, A Kobe


Application of radio frequency heating to accelerate fixation of CCA in treated round-wood
1999 - IRG/WP 99-40133
The potential of radio frequency heating to accelerate the fixation of chromated copper arsenate (CCA) in treated round-wood was assessed. Pre-dried Douglas-fir and western red cedar round-wood sections were pressure treated with CCA in a pilot plant retort, after which they were placed individually in a pilot radio frequency (RF) chamber. Based upon the color reaction of chromotropic acid with hexavalent chromium and the quantitative assessment using diphenyl carbazide, fixation was achieved in less than 6 hours. During heating, the temperature at various locations inside the pole sections was monitored by fiber-optic thermocouples. The moisture profiles before, and after fixation, were also recorded. Further studies will examine other benefit of RF heating, including a) sterilization, and b) rapid drying of round-wood with minimum check formation.
Fang Fang, J N R Ruddick


Soft-rot ultrastructure
1981 - IRG/WP 1138 (+ Addendum)
The stages of growth of soft-rot fungal hyphae in birch cell walls has been studied using transmission electron microscopy. These observations are compared with time-lapsed cinemicrographic studies on infection and cavity development within wood cell walls which show a start-stop hyphal growth pattern. The fine structure of hyphae during each stage of the decay process shows that hyphae penetrating the wood cell wall have dense, granular cell contents and few recognisable cell organelles. As cavities widen and the hyphae within them increase in size, a hyphal cell wall is laid down, septation occurs and cell organelles are present. At maturity, cavity hyphae become vacuolate, slightly distorted in form.
M D C Hale, R A Eaton


Protocol for evaluation and approving new wood preservative
1985 - IRG/WP 2159
M E Hedley, J A Butcher


Local preservation with difluoride pills: Life-time of preservative
1998 - IRG/WP 98-40127
A brief history of the situation in the Netherlands with respect to the preservation of joinery is given. Already in the eighties in the Netherlands many spruce window frames were treated with difluoride pills. One of the possible disadvantages of this kind of diffusing preservatives is the high leaching rate found in laboratory situations. The leaching rate in practice is influenced by many factors of which the condition of the paint systems and the condition of the glue in the joint are the most important. In this research the difluoride content in wood was analysed in samples which were taken from several buildings. An estimation of the remaining difluoride content leached is given. Related to these figures the remaining life of the protecting agent can be calculated. The results show that even in situations with open joints of paint damage the remaining amount of difluoride is still very high after 10 years. This suggests that in practice the leaching of difluorides is of minor importance.
W J Homan, C Blom, B W Holleboom


Microcapsule formulation of fenitrothion as a soil termiticide
1991 - IRG/WP 1478
The efficacy and the mode of action of a microcapsule formulation of fenitrothion against Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki were investigated. The physicochemical property that this formulation does not allow the active ingredient to diffuse through the capsule wall contributed to a long lasting efficacy and safety for the men spraying. The residual effect of the fenitrothion microcapsule in soil was revealed as well as that of chlordane in the laboratory test. It was clarified that the transmission of poisoning through the worker's self- and mutual grooming behavior contributed to the efficacy of this formulation. And it was suggested that the transmission of poisoning of fenitrothion through mutual grooming led to the collapse of a colony.
H Teshima, T Itoh, Y Abe


The effect of temperature on the rate of fixation of an alkyl ammonium compound (AAC) wood preservative
1984 - IRG/WP 3293
The rate of fixation of an alkyl ammonium compound wood preservative was measured by soaking samples of wood wool in various preparations of the preservative for arbitrary times followed by immediate leaching in water. The wood wool was then analysed for residual preservative. The results indicated that fixation was very rapid and increased at higher temperatures.
P Vinden


CCA Chemistry
1983 - IRG/WP 3268
A Pizzi


Errata to Document No: IRG/WP/3276
1984 - IRG/WP 3285
W E Conradie


Tentative method of testing wood preservatives against blue staining
1977 - IRG/WP 259
The blue stain of sawn wood is still a real problem in Poland. Although a preservative based on sodium orthophenylphenoxide has been introduced into sawmill practice, and the technology of wood protection developed with it, new information has been obtained concerning blue stain in wood material destined for export. In order to select new chemicals or to improve the effectiveness of the ones in current use it is necessary initially to carry out laboratory tests of the prepared chemicals to determine their efficiency.
E Tarocinski, O Lewandowski, M H Zielinski


Time dependent over-uptake of etherificated melamine resins
1998 - IRG/WP 98-40109
Waterbased methanol-etherificated melamine-formaldehyde resins can increase the fungal resistance of the treated wood though they are known to be non-toxic. Therefore melamine-resins are at the present an object of research activities of European projects and of some companies. The paper highlights the importance of quoting the duration of the diffusion when immersed in the treating solution, as major differences in the effectiveness against fungal attack can be obtained by extending the diffusion period. This paper also critically reviews the practice of referring the concentration of the solutions used for impregnation to a fixed solids content of this type of resins.
D Lukowsky, R-D Peek


Evaluation of the decay caused by Chaetomium globosum Kunze, in the course of time
1987 - IRG/WP 2288
The main research done on soft rot has been directed to determining, by microscopic study, the different stages of penetration into the wood of the fungi that cause it. On the basis of the information furnished by this research, in this work we have tried to quantify its effect, by evaluating the weight loss caused by Chaetomium globosum Kunce in wood of Pinus sylvestris L. and Fagus sylvatica L. in the course of time. The results obtained corroborate the existence of succesive stages of decay which is shown by large differences in the weight loss.
M T De Troya, A M Navarrete


Effect of felling time related to lunar calendar on the durability of wood and bamboo -Fungal degradation during above ground exposure test for 2 years- (Preliminary report)
2005 - IRG/WP 05-20311
Current study was carried out to know whether the felling time of trees and bamboos based on lunar calendar affects natural durability of felled wood-bamboo or not. Each of one sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) tree of 28 years old and one Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla) of around 3 years old was cut 12 times between February and December in 2003. Six sets of sugi tree and bamboo were felled in a day during “Hassen” period and the other 6 sets of them were also felled in a nearby non-“Hassen” day. There is a belief that “Hassen” should be avoided to perform destructive works such as cutting trees. “Hassen” lasting 12 days based on lunar calendar appears 6 times every year. After felling sample trees and bamboos, these specimens were subject to outdoor exposure at above ground level for 2 years. Properties of specimens such as moisture contents, mould and fungal resistance were examined periodically for 2 years. There was no clear difference in the degree of mould growth on the surface between specimens felled in a “Hassen” day and those felled in a non-“Hassen” day in the same month. The felling seasons, however, influenced the growth of mould on the surface of wood and bamboo clearly, which has been traditionally known in many cases. Fungal degradation evaluated by visual observation and the depth of pin penetration using Pilodyn during 2 years exposure was not affected by not only “Hassen” or non-“Hassen” also seasons when tree and bamboo felled.
K Yamamoto, S Uesugi, K Kawakami


TBTO absorption and penetration in pine joinery treated by various processes
1989 - IRG/WP 3523
Matched sections of several White pine (Pinus strobus) and Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) mouldings were treated with TBTO by Double vacuum, modified empty-cell, 15 second dip and several preheating treatments followed by a 15 s dip treatments. As expected the double vacuum and empty-cell (batch) treatments resulted in much greater retentions and penetrations than the dip treatments. The absorptions by the 15 s dip treatments could be improved significantly by preheating the wood to 60-90C° by microwave, radio-frequency or infra-red techniques. Since this approach is amenable to a continuous treatment process, it is being evaluated for potential commercial application.
P A Cooper, Y T Ung


The effect of high temperature and long pressing time on the dimensional stability and decay resistance of OSB
2002 - IRG/WP 02-40237
The exterior use of OSB is restricted because when it is exposed to wet conditions swelling, loss of internal bond strength (IB) and decay occur. In this study an alternative process of pressing which results in the production of dimensionally stable and a more decay resistant strandboard was investigated. Boards were pressed at elevated temperatures for prolonged pressing cycles and their physical (thickness swelling and water absorption after 2 and 24 hours soak), mechanical properties (IB, MOR, MOE) and decay resistance were assessed. Analysis of variance (ANOVA, p=0.005) between pressing time/temperature and each property tested were used for the assessment of the results. The decay resistance of the boards was tested according to a draft European standard (DD ENV 12038: 1996) with a slight modification to the sample size. Boards were tested against Coniophora puteana, Postia placenta, Trametes versicolor and Pleurotus ostreatus. The results of this study showed that the increase of pressing time and temperature resulted in significant reductions in the thickness swelling and water absorption of the boards. The treatment had little effect on board mechanical properties. The resistance to fungal biodegradation was significantly improved at the higher temperature / pressing time combinations tested. The results of this study show that the production of a dimensionally stable and a more decay resistant OSB is possible without excessive use of preservative chemicals. If adopted these findings may lead to the development of new wood-based panel products (non-preserved dimensional stable and decay resistant hazard class 3-OSB) which may replace preservative treated plywood and solid wood for many exterior construction applications.
G J Goroyias, M D C Hale


Comparison of decay rates of preservative-treated stakes in field and fungus cellar tests. Results after 40 months fungal cellar exposure
1983 - IRG/WP 2200
Decay rates of preservative-treated Pinus radiata stakes during 40 months exposure in the FRI fungus cellar were compared with those of similarly treated material in a field test. Decay rates in the fungus cellar were from 4 to 100 times higher than in the field, although for the majority of preservatives the rate was between 7 and 12 times higher. The lag phase before onset of decay, noticeable with most of the preservatives in the field test, was largely eliminated in the fungus cellar. Possible reasons are given for inconsistencies in relative rates of decay of preservatives in the two tests.
M E Hedley


Investigation of microwave as a means of eradicating dry rot attack in buildings
1992 - IRG/WP 92-1545
A microwave-apparatus developed for treatment of building-structures infested by dry rot was tested in the laboratory. The test-conditions simulated treatment of either infested timber or infested brickwork. Sawdust samples, both wet and dry, infested by viable mycelium of Serpula lacrymans were packed in glass-tubes. The tubes were then placed in the middle of either 20 cm thick wooden beams or 35 cm brickwork. The temperature during microwave-treatment was measured both in the tubes using toluene thermometers and in the "construction" using thermo-couples of the copper-constantine-type. The viability after treatment was tested by growth-ability on malt-agar, by ATP-content and by nucleus-staining. The lethal temperature with this specific apparatus was 37-39°C in brickwork and 40-50°C in wood. In comparison with more conventional methods of heat transfer microwaves seem to be more efficient. The variation in temperature within the treated area was undesirably high and in situ treatment above lethal temperature with this specific apparatus would lead to an unacceptably high risk of damage.
C Kjerulf-Jensen, A P Koch


The effect of felling time of year on CCA fixation rate and quality of selected hardwoods
1998 - IRG/WP 98-40116
White birch (Betula papyrifera), poplar (Populus sp.) and red maple (Acer rubrum) trees were harvested in winter, in spring, before the leaves flushed, after leaf flush and later in the summer. Sapwood discs were cut from the freshly felled trees, dried and cut into 25 mm and 19 mm cubes. The cubes were pressure impregnated with CCA-C and fixed under high relative humidity and at 50°C or at room temperature (21°C) conditions. Fixation rate was measured by expressing cubes periodically and analysing the expressate for CrVI content using a diphenyl carbazide indicator. The expressate was also examined for chromium, copper and arsenic using ASOMA X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Red maple wood harvested in spring fixed more slowly than wood cut in either the winter or the summer. This is thought to be related to the sugar, starch and other nutrient content of the wood at different times of the year. The time of year of felling had no consistent effect on the speed of fixation in white birch and poplar sapwood. Fixation quality was evaluated by leaching studies on 19 mm cubes using AWPA standard E 11-87. As has been observed elsewhere with red maple and other species, rapid fixation rate is accompanied by poor quality of fixation of CCA components, and especially of arsenic. We conclude that the season during which red maple is harvested can have a great effect of CCA performance in this species, which helps explain variable fixation rates and quality of fixation observed previously with this species.
Y T Ung, A Taylor, P A Cooper, D P Kamdem


Sludge formation in timber treatment with CCA preservatives. Origin and elimination
1984 - IRG/WP 3276
The exact distributions between lignin and holocellulose and retentions on wood of copper, chromium and arsenic as a function of various sets of conditions in a factorial experiment in which combinations of three temperatures of treatment, three CCA solution concentrations, four pH's of the initial CCA solution and two timber species, namely Pinus radiata and Eucalyptus grandis, are reported. Temperature and concentration appear to have an equally important effect on the preservative chemicals retentions and distribution in timber. pH, has also an effect but somewhat less marked than temperature and concentration, with the exception of the formation of sludges. Multivariable regression equations describing the amounts of Cu, Cr and As fixed on lignin and holocellulose for both pine and eucalyptus are also presented. The timber species treated also appears to have an important influence on the amounts of chemicals fixed and their distribution. Eucalyptus appears to be much less tolerant than pine to extremes of treating conditions. The influence of treating time under the most common treating conditions is also briefly discussed.
A Pizzi, W E Conradie, A Jansen


Effects of surfactants and ultrasonic energy on the treatment of wood with chromated copper arsenate
1977 - IRG/WP 3108
Sugar pine stakes 1'' x 1" x 16" were treated by a hot-water bath followed by soaking in cold CCA solution for 10 to 30 minutes. A similar number of stakes were treated by a cold-cold bath. Half of the stakes were subjected to ultrasonic energy during the CCA bath. The mean absorption for stakes given the hot-cold bath was 18.52 pcf (297 kg/m³) and 4.64 pcf (74 kg/m³) for those given the cold-cold bath. The rates of absorption were o.323 pcf (5 kg/m³) per minute and 0.053 pcf (0.85 kg/m³) per minute, respectively. The relationship between absorption in pounds per cubic foot (Y) and soaking time in minutes (X); Y = 12.27+0.323 X, was linear and significant. The linear relationship for the cold-cold treatment was poor (r = 0.305). Neither ultrasonic energy, nor its interaction with soaking time, had a significant effect on solution absorption for either the hot-cold or cold-cold treatments. In a second series, the stakes were treated in the CCA solution with a 3-minute dip, a 48-hour cold soak, and Lowry pressure. Half of the stakes were treated in the solution to which a surfactant had been added. The interacting effect of surfactant and method of treatment was significant. The highest absorption was obtained when the specimens were treated with the solution containing the surfactant by the Lowry method, 35.13 pcf (563 kg/m³). In comparison, the absorption was 22.55 pcf (361 kg/m³), 36 percent lower, when surfactant was not used. The surfactant had a beneficial effect on the results of the 3-minute dip, but not the 48-hour soak.
C S Walters


Strength properties of preservative treated pine and spruce wood after super-heated steaming
1984 - IRG/WP 3313
Possible changes of strength properties of CCF pressure impregnated pine and spruce with subsequent steaming at 110°C respective 120°C for 30 min were examined. For spruce analysis of variance indicated that none of the processes had a significant effect on bending strength, compression strength and the corresponding modulus of elasticity as well as on impact bending strength and shear strength radial resp. tangential to the grain. For pine no changes in the bending strength and the compression strength could be detected. The impact bending strength of unsteamed or steamed impregnated samples decreased with 12% compared to non-treated controls due to the brittleness of the salt-impregnated timber. It could be proved that neither steam treatment of 110°C nor of 120°C for 30 min. alone causes a significant change of strength properties of pine and spruce. Arising variations can be explained from anatomical wood properties as well as salt deposits in the samples as a consequence to impregnation.
R-D Peek


Efficiency of wood impregnation processes
1980 - IRG/WP 3151
Many wood impregnation processes have been in use for a very long time, up to 150 years, but they have not been progressively modified. This paper considers impregnation processes in relation to current requirements, particularly impregnation efficiency and energy consumption. The term 'pore' is used throughout in its physical sense and is not confined to botanical 'pores'. SI units are used and, for convenience, atmospheric pressure is assumed to be exactly 100 N/m²; complete vacuum is 0 N/m². These observations and conclusions summarise an extensive programme of investigation at Penarth Research Centre involving creosote and water-borne preservatives, as well as a range of organic solvent preservatives.
B A Richardson


Limiting Conditions for Decay in Wood Systems
2002 - IRG/WP 02-10421
Hygrothermal models can predict temperature and moisture conditions in wall components subjected to real weather data, but specific data and a fundamental understanding of how temperature and wood moisture content dictate the progression of decay under these conditions is required for modellers to predict consequences of decay on building performance. It is well understood that wood will decay above 30% moisture content and will not decay below 20% moisture content. Moisture contents between 20% and 30% represent a grey area. This paper describes cooperative work underway at our two Institutes to define limiting conditions of humidity/moisture and temperature that allow the initiation and progression of decay to diminish the structural performance of wood and wood composites as used in North American light-framed construction. Some preliminary results on time to initiation of decay in wood composites and moisture thresholds for wood materials under steady state environmental conditions are presented. Such a fundamental understanding of the limiting thresholds and eventual rates of decay above those thresholds is mandatory before legitimate models can be developed to predict the expected or residual serviceability of new or old building materials, respectively.
P I Morris, J E Winandy


Influence of felling time on the natural durability of norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.)
1998 - IRG/WP 98-10250
Natural durability was tested in a laboratory test according to EN 113. The test fungi were Coniophora puteana and Poria placenta. Additionally, the test method was modified by using water agar instead of malt agar, so that wood was the only nutrient source for the fungi. In a third attempt the samples were inoculated with Trichoderma harzianum before testing. The trees were felled on the 22.7.97 and the 22.12.97 at the same site (Mariensee, Lower Austria). The distribution of moisture in all trees was typical and showed no significant difference between summer and winter. The durability of the samples taken in summer did not vary according to their position in the stem (sapwood, transition wood, heartwood). By now (27.3.98) the durability test of the samples taken in winter is in progress - data will be available by the end of May and will be presented in Maastricht.
M Hirmke, K Messner, J Fellner, A Teischinger, R Wimmer


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