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Effect of acetylation on decay resistance of wood against brown-rot, white-rot and soft-rot fungi
1989 - IRG/WP 3540
Effect of acetylation on decay resistance of wood was investigated using wood blocks of Cryptomeria japonica, Pinus densiflora, Albizia falcata and Fagus crenata. Blocks were treated with uncatalyzed acetic anhydride for different lengths of time and exposed to Tyromyces palustris, Serpula lacrymans, Coriolus versicolor and unsterilized soil. The action of OH-radical on acetylated wood was also examined using Fenton's reagent. The enhancement of decay resistance by acetylation was revealed clearly for all cases of exposures but varying with fungal and wood species used. For a brown-rot fungus Tyromyces palustris, the weight loss reached almost nil in all woods at 20 WPG (weight percent gain) of acetylation, after the striking decrease from 10 to 15 WPG. For a white-rot fungus Coriolus versicolor, it was counted until 12-15 WPG in the perishable hardwoods used, but not in a softwood Cryptomeria japonica, even at 6 WPG. In cases of another brown-rotter Serpula lacrymans and soil burial, effect of acetylation was intermediate between Tyromyces palustris and Coriolus versicolor. Anti-degradation mechanism by acetylation was discussed, from these weight loss - weight gain relationships, and the IR-and 13C-NMR spectral analyses of fungus-exposed wood.
M Takahashi, Y Imamura, M Tanahashi


Questionnaire - Fungal decay types
1985 - IRG/WP 1265
T Nilsson


Effects of acetylation on the dimensional stability and decay resistance of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) fiberboard
1996 - IRG/WP 96-40059
The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the acetylation treated kenaf fiber, Phenol formaldehyde resin content level, and three fungi species on the dimensional stability and decay resistance of high density non wood composition boards. A standard ASTM method was used to evaluate weight loss and thickness change. The linear shrinkage and expansion of each species were also determined. All specimens were exposed to decay chambers for 16 weeks. Test results indicated that most of the main factors significantly influence the thickness, length changes, and decay resistance of the high density kenaf fiberboards.
P Chow, T Harp, R Meimban, J A Youngquist, R M Rowell


Physical properties of ß-1,4-Xylanase produced by Postia (=Poria) placenta: Implications for the control of brown rot
1987 - IRG/WP 1318
The degradation of hemicelluloses is an early event in wood decay by brown-rot fungi. An understanding of the physical properties of hemicellulases may suggest target mechanisms for the development of new control agents. Endo-b-1,4-xylanase was partially purified by column chromatography from wood decayed by Postia (= Poria) placenta. The enzyme was extremely resistant to denaturing conditions; no loss of activity was detected after 2 h in 9 M urea or 6 M guanidine-HCl. Boiling the enzyme for 5 min in 2.5% SDS + 0.5% b-mercaptoethanol reduced its activity by 65%, as measured by the production of reducing sugars. The activity of a-D-galactosidase, another enzyme detected in large quantities in the decayed wood, was reduced by 98% under these conditions. Optimum pH and temperature ranges were pH 2-6 and 50-60°C, respectively. The enzyme appears to be a glycoprotein containing 50-60% carbohydrate (w/w); the carbohydrate moiety may protect the enzyme from adverse environmental conditions. The control of brown rot by in situ inactivation of xylanase may not be feasible because of the enzyme's extreme stability.
J A Micales, F Green III, C A Clausen, T L Highley


Types of decay observed in CCA-treated pine posts in horticultural situations in New Zealand
1984 - IRG/WP 1226
The few reported failures of 11-12-year-old horticultural posts in New Zealand in 1982 were caused by brown-rot. A subsequent survey of CCA-treated posts in all the major horticultural areas has revealed decay of many posts. A microscopic examination of these posts has shown decay by brown-rot, white-rot, soft-rot and bacteria. Several types of bacterial decay have been observed.
J A Drysdale, M E Hedley


Durability of larch (Larix spp.) wood against brown-rot fungi
1997 - IRG/WP 97-10228
Durability of the heartwood of Larix decidua, L. sibirica, L. gmelinii, L. gmelinii var japonica, L. gmelinii var olgensis and L. sibirica x decidua against brown rot fungi Coniophora puteana, Poria placenta and Gloeophyllum trabeum was tested according to EN 113 test method. Parallel samples were used to study the amount and composition of wood extractives. The sample trees originated from the research forest of Punkaharju Research Station. The average age of the trees was 60 years. In addition, from L. sibirica also trees at 25 and 102 years were used. Results show that the durability of larch is depending on species, age of the tree, the wood part (inner or outer heartwood) and fungus. The average durability of larch heartwood was equal to class 3 or 4 (moderately or slightly durable, according to the standard EN350:2) and comparable with the durability of pine heartwood (Pinus sylvestris L). However, the durability of L. gmelinii var olgensis and L. sibirica (102 years old) was on the higher level than that of the other studied species but the durability varied even within the same board. Also the durability of wood from L. sibirica grown in the Russian side (Siberia) was studied. It was equal to that of the trees grown in Finland. The average amount of resin acids of larch heartwood was only about 0.1% (dry weight). In contrast, the heartwood of scots pine may contain up to 4.0% of resin acids. Resin acids are found to inhibit the linear growth of certain fungi. Interestingly, the largest amounts of resin acids (0.3%) were found in the heartwood of L. gmelinii which also showed high durability. The concentration of water soluble extracts (mainly arabinogalactan) of larch heartwood was quite large, varying between 3.2 - 20.5%. The concentration of water soluble extracts in the heartwood increased along the age of the trees. Lowest level of extractives were found in Larix decidua which was also the least decay resistant species. The durability of wood in different targets and the role of different chemical compounds of larch heartwood on decay resistance needs to be clarified.
H Viitanen, L Paajanen, P Saranpää, P Viitaniemi


The dry rot fungus and other fungi in houses. Part 2
1993 - IRG/WP 93-10001
J Bech-Andersen


Some characteristics of Pinus radiata wood from trees subjected to resin extraction
1987 - IRG/WP 3403
35 year old Pinus radiata trees growing in La Puntilla (lat. 37° south, long. 72,4° west), Chile, were subjected to resin extraction 5 years ago. After harvesting them simultaneously with control trees of the same place and age, probes were taken from the bottom of each pole, at 3.4 m, 7.8 m and 11.4 m height. Analysis of ethanol/benzene extract, CCA salt penetration tests and sapstain and brown-rot development rate were performed. The extract content differed in both groups. In the ascendent sense it decreases in unextracted trees and increases in extracted. CCA salt penetration was deeper in treated trees than in untreated. Wood subjectect to resin extraction was less susceptible to sapstain development. No significant difference was detected in both groups in relation to the development of brown-rot.
M C Rose, J Navarrete, G Sandoval, A Bedoya, L Ortega, R Zurita


Physical and biological properties of albizzia waferboards modified with cross-linking agents
1995 - IRG/WP 95-40043
Chemically-modified low-density waferboards with cross-linking agents were produced using a fast-growing species of hardwood albizzia (Paraserienthes falcata Becker) as a raw materials and isocyanate resin as a glue adhesive. For the chemical modification, the vapor-phase formalization of the boards and the pad-dry-cure treatment of wafers with cross-linking agents were employed. The vapor-phase formalization was conducted for 5, 10 and 24 hours using tetraoxane as a source of formaldehyde, and the pad-dry-cure treatments with glutaraldehyde and ethyleneurea compound (DMDHEU) were made after impregnation of their 5 and 10% aqueous solutions of each chemical. Sulfur dioxide was used as a catalyst in both treatments. About 70% of antiswelling efficiency (ASE) was gained in all treated boards irrespective of reaction time or solution concentration. All treated boards were very stable to water soaking even in the 2-hour boiling on thickness swelling as well as linear expansion. Laboratory tests with brown-rot and white-rot fungi revealed that decay was completely suppressed in formaldehyde-treated boards, and small losses in weight were counted in other treated boards. All treated boards were also effective in resisting to the attack by the destructive termite Coptotermes formosanus.
S Yusuf, Y Imamura, M Takahashi, K Minato


Gloeophyllum trabeum and Gloeophyllum abietinum, the most frequent brown rot fungi in fir wood joinery
1999 - IRG/WP 99-10319
In Croatia the primary raw material for joinery production is silver fir wood (Abies alba Mill). L-joints made of home-grown fir sapwood and prepared according to EN 330: 1993 were used to establish the infection and colonisation of micro-organisms, particularly wood decay fungi, to compare the performance of untreated and 1% TnBTO treated L-joints. The L-joints were coated with two types of coat, and 36 months exposed in Zagreb. The first type of coat was alkyd paint and the second was a stain, in three different colours: white, brown, and black. The influence of the preservative, and the type of coat were most important factors which affected the rate of colonisation. The influence of coat colours was significant at the the beginning of exposure. The fastest and the strongest colonisation occurred in untreated L-joints coated with alkyd paint and the lowest colonisation occurred in treated L-joints coated with stain. It was due to the well known vaporous diffusivity of the stains and the low natural permeability of fir sapwood. The most frequently isolated fungi were Gloeophyllum trabeum (Pers.: Fr.) Murr. and Gloeophyllum abietinum (Bull.: Fr.) Karst.
R Despot, M Glavas


The influence of crystalline and amorphous cellulose on extracellular hydrogen peroxide production by brown-rot fungi
1991 - IRG/WP 1482
The production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been suggested to play a key role in the degradation of wood by wood-rotting fungi. The production of extracellular hydrogen peroxide was studied by a quantitative method which detects the oxidation of the 2,2-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) by H2O2 and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in liquid culture medium. The carbon sources used were crystalline and amorphous cellulose. Two brown-rotters, Serpula lacrymans and Poria placenta, were able to produce clearly detectable amounts of extracellular hydrogen peroxide in liquid medium which contained crystalline cellulose as carbon source. No detectable H2O2 was produced in conditions where amorphous medium was used as carbon source. This result suggests that the conformational structure of the substrate may induce H2O2 production by brown-rot fungi.
A-C Ritschkoff, L Viikari


Electron microscopic detection and chemical analysis of three-lamellar structures in wood-destroying fungi
1984 - IRG/WP 1240
In the course of transmission electron microscopical investigations of pine wood decay by various brown- and white-rot fungi extracellular three-lamellar structures (TLS) formed by the fungi were found in specimens stained with ruthenium red. These structures occured in the lumen of the wood cell surrounding the hypha at the outermost layer of the fungal cell wall. In the course of the investigations these structures were also detected in fungi cultivated with glucose on a rotary shaker, where they showed forms similar to tubuli and vesicles. The three-lamellar structures formed by the white-rot fungus Sporotrichum pulverulentum, which were contained in the outermost cell wall layer, were isolated by disintegration of the fungal pellet and subsequent digestion of the fungal cell wall by snail enzyme. It was found that these structures are resistant to the enzymatic digestion and are composed of 80 to 90% carbohydrates, mainly consisting of glucose monomeres, 5 to 10% proteins, containing 5 fractions with molecular weights between 30000 and 200000, and finally 5 to 10% lipids which do not contain any phospholipid.
R Foisner, K Messner, H Stachelberger, M Röhr


Some physiological characteristics of a non-degradative strain of Postia (=Poria) placenta
1988 - IRG/WP 1341
The decay capacity of 14 strains of the brown-rot fungus Postia (= Poria) placenta was determined using soil-wood block tests. One isolate was identified as being unable to degrade wood and was determined to be monokaryotic. It retained the ability to produce extracellular carbohydrate-degrading enzymes, although regulation of certain enzymes was atypical under certain cultural conditions. It produced H2O2 and oxalic acid under a variety of carbon and nitrogen regimes, and did not contain double-stranded RNA. It failed to produce large quantities of extracellular polysaccharides in culture. An understanding of the physiology of this isolate would further our knowledge of decay mechanisms leading to safer preservation protocols.
J A Micales, T L Highley


Extracellular layers of wood decay fungi and copper tolerance
1983 - IRG/WP 1180
Extracellular layers around the hyphae of brown, white and soft rot fungi have been examined using electron microscopy. These layers were isolated for identification. Particular interest was directed towards the extracellular layers of copper-tolerant soft rot fungi.
D M Francis, L E Leightley


Detection of brown rot decay in wood by ion mobility spectrometry
1991 - IRG/WP 2377
A test method for the detection of brown rot decay in wood is described and involves a two-step procedure: thermal release of vapours from wood samples followed by analysis using Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS), with results being obtained in 5-10 seconds. The advantages, limitations as well as the detection limit of the technique are presented.
A H Lawrence, T Nilsson


Decay patterns observed in butylene oxide modified ponderosa pine attacked by Fomitopsis pinicola
1983 - IRG/WP 1183
Small blocks of ponderosa pine chemically modified by butylene oxide to three different weight percent gains (WPG) were decayed for 2 months with the brown rot fungus Fomitopsis pinicola. Wood substance loss and the type of decay pattern recognised were fairly similar both for control and blocks treated to 8 and 15 WPG. No difference in attack was observed between radial or tangential walls in latewood tracheids. Microscopical examination of undecayed wood blocks treated to 23.7 WPG revealed numerous cracks in both the middle lamella regions of radial walls and in cell corners of latewood tracheids. The fungus had gained entry to the cracks, possibly via bordered pits and rays. Attack started from the cracks and progressed along the middle lamella and towards the cell lumen.
T Nilsson, R M Rowell


Prevention of brown-rot decay by chelators
1992 - IRG/WP 92-1540
In this work the brown-rot decay was shown to be prevented by chelating the endogenous metals existing in wood by using organic or inorganic chelators or iron-binding siderophores. The fungal growth and decaying ability were significantly decreased by the chelating treatments of the solid wood-based culture medium and pine wood pieces, respectively. The transition metals existing in native wood are proposed to be the key elements in the brown-rot decay mechanism. Of these, especially iron has an important role both in the oxidative degradative pathway and for the growth of the decaying organism. This new method may lead to the development of a specific efficient and non-toxic method for preventing brown-rot.
L Viikari, A-C Ritschkoff


An insight into brown rot decay of timber as revealed by 13C CP/MAS NMR
1985 - IRG/WP 1259
L E Leightley


Non-enzymatic Gloeophyllum trabeum decay mechanisms: Further study
2001 - IRG/WP 01-10395
Information will be presented on the mechanisms involved in, and potential application of, non-enzymatic wood decay by brown rot decay fungi. Specifically, the hypothesized role of low molecular weight phenolate derivatives will be discussed in relation to non-enzymatic degradation of wood. The mechanism of binding of iron by cellulose, and binding and reduction of iron by fungal derivatives and model compounds is examined. Positive and negative aspects of potential application of these compounds in the generation of free radicals will be discussed.
B Goodell, J Jellison


Monographic card: Coniophora puteana (Schum. ex Fr.) Karst. (Second draft)
1978 - IRG/WP 171
A Käärik


Detection of incipient brown rot decay in wood by fourier transform infrared spectrometry
1987 - IRG/WP 2275
Fourier transform infrared spectrometry was evaluated as a possible method for detecting different levels of brown-rot decay in pine sapwood. By using first derivative spectra and regression analysis, an equation based on 4 absorption peaks, normalized with an internal standard peak, was developed. The correlation between weight loss and absorption was highly significant indicating that this is a valid method for detecting incipient brown-rot decay.
D D Nicholas, T Schultz


Monographic information on Serpula (Merulius) lacrymans (Schum. ex Fr.) S. F. Gray, according to the 'Model Questionnaire for preparation of monographic cards for wood-destroying fungi'
1978 - IRG/WP 170
J Segmüller, O Wälchli


Spatial arrangement of lignin peroxidase in pine decayed by Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Fomitopsis pinicola
1988 - IRG/WP 1343
By applying immunoelectronmicroscopic methods, lignin peroxidase of the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has been localized in the cytoplasm of hyphae, close to the plasmalemma and on the plasmalemma. Infiltration of wood specimen with culture filtrates, concentrated 300-fold, gave clear information on the penetration of the enzyme into the wood cell wall. Penetration was restricted to superficial areas. No diffusion of enzymes into the cell wall took place in white rot. Likewise, infiltration of wood. degraded by the brown rot fungus Fomitopsis pinicola, did not indicate free diffusion of the enzyme within the cell wall. This was taken as a proof of non-ezymatic cell wall degradation in brown rot.
E Srebotnik, K Messner


Involvement of hydrogen peroxide in wood decay by brown-rot and white-rot fungi
1985 - IRG/WP 1256
To gain further understanding of the role of H2O2 in wood degradation by brown- and white-rot fungi, we studied the following: (a) extracellular H2O2 production, (b) effect of various hydroxyl radical (·OH) and singlet O2 (1O2) quenching agents on wood and cellulose degradation, (c) intracellular H2O2 production and catalase activity, and (d) cytochemical localization of H2O2 with diaminobenzidine (DAB) during wood degradation. Extracellular H2O2 detection varied with the growth media and chromogen. The chromogen 2,2'-azino-di-(3-ethyl benzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) was more sensitive than o-dianisidine. Extracellular H2O2 was not detected in half of the brown-rot fungi. One white-rot fungus did not produce detectable amounts of H2O2. ·OH and 1O2 quenching agents generally did not inhibit decay of wood or decomposition of cellulose by either brown- or white-rot fungi. DAB did not detect the presence of H2O2 within or outside cells of the brown-rot fungus, Poria placenta. Nor was H2O2 -generating activity detected in sonicated extracts of this fungus. With the white-rot fungus, Coriolus versicolor, H2O2 occurred predominantly in the periplasmic space, but also in the cytoplasm and hyphal sheath. Sonicates of Coriolus versicolor contained H2O2 -generating activity. These observations provide further support for H2O2 involvement in degradation of wood by white-rot fungi, but raise doubts concerning its participation in wood degradation by brown-rot fungi.
T L Highley, L L Murmanis


Characterization of glycopeptide from white-, brown- and soft rot fungi
2002 - IRG/WP 02-10424
Extracellular low-molecular-weight substances that catalyze a redox reaction between O2 and electron donors to produce hydroxyl radicals have been isolated from wood degrading cultures of white-rot, brown-rot, and soft-rot fungi. They contained protein, neutral carbohydrate, and Fe(II). These substances were glycosylated (glycated) peptides and suggested to form Amadori product (ketoamine). The glycopeptides are involved in all three types of decay.
H Tanaka, S Itakura, A Enoki


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