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Fungicidal properties of boron containing preservative Borosol 9
2004 - IRG/WP 04-30348
The fungicidal properties of new boron containing wood preservative Borosol 9 is described in this paper. These properties were of particular interest as this new boron containing preservative, exhibit very good performance against wood damaging insects. But because the tested boron formulation contain also nitrogen compounds, we wanted to verify if nitrogen as a nutrient could promote growth of wood rotting and blue stain fungi. Fungicidal activity of the boron based wood preservative Borosol 9 was evaluated according to the standard EN 113 procedure. Samples made of Norway spruce were brushed two times with 10% aqueous solution of Borosol 9, air dried, steam sterilized and exposed to the following wood rotting fungi: Coniophora puteana, Gloeophyllum trabeum and Lentinus lepideus. After 16 weeks of exposure the specimens were isolated and their mass losses were determined. After this respective period, the treated wood samples lost on an average less than 1 % of their initial mass. Parallel to this experiment, blue stain testing according to the EN 152-1 procedure was performed. Specimens brushed with Borosol were for six weeks exposed to blue stain fungi Aureobasidium pullulans and Sclerophoma pithyophila. After testing period the specimens were isolated and anti blue stain efficacy was determined visually. Both tests showed that Borosol 9 has fungicidal properties. Preservative, containing the boric acid - alkanolamine complex did not enhance fungal decay or growth. On the contrary, they showed high activity against wood decay and blue stain fungi.
G Babuder, M Petric, F Cadež, M Humar, F Pohleven


Effectiveness of the new chemical wood preservative Borosol 9? against a house longhorn beetle Hylotrupes bajulus
2004 - IRG/WP 04-30355
Chemical wood preservative Borosol 9, consisting of boric acid - alkanolamine complex, is a new wood preservative with proven efficacy against wood decay fungi. However, we were interested in its efficacy against larvae of house longhorn beetle (Hylotrupes bajulus). Thus, experiment according to the EN 46 procedure was performed. Specimens made of Norway spruce wood (Picea abies) were brushed twice with 10 % Borosol 9 solution. The results showed that most of the larvae were able to tunnel into the treated specimens, but none of them were found alive after the test period of 12 weeks. On the other hand, all control untreated samples were damaged by H. bajulus larvae activity and 98 % of larvae survived. Results indicate that Borosol 9 has an efficient insecticidal activity and acts protective against wood boring insects.
G Babuder, M Petric, F Cadež, M Humar, F Pohleven


The development of a new boron-based wood preservative
1995 - IRG/WP 95-30085
The paper describes a new boron based wood preservative for the treatment of green timber. The product offers many benefits over conventional boron diffusion treatment including: 1. high viscosity, high concentration formulation; 2. permits dip treatment of a wide range of sawn board and pole sizes at ambient temperatures; 3. permits full cross section diffusion of borates without block stacking and wrapping of treated material; 4. treated material is ready for use within a few hours after dipping, this eliminates long storage periods; 5. a water-repellent coating which acts both as a leach retardant and protects the timber against weathering; 6. the new product permits the use of borates in H3 class situations. Evaluation of diffusion trials and simulated rain test data on treated material is discussed.
P Turner, D Conradie


Preliminary screening of a boron based wood preservative for biological efficacy (fungicidal) in treated timber
2006 - IRG/WP 06-30396
The resistance of Pinus radiata D.Don sapwood blocks, treated with a boron based preservative, to attack by five wood destroying fungi (Fomitopsis lilacino-gilva, Coniophora olivacea, Gloeophyllum abietinum (boron resistant), Serpula lacrymans and Perenniporia tephropora) was investigated. A phenyl pyrazole termiticide (fipronil) was also incorporated into the formulation to examine if its presence affects biological efficacy. The raw linseed oil, liquid wax, terebene and trimethyl borate formulation inhibited decay by the trial fungi. Incorporation of fipronil did not impact the fungicidal properties. Fipronil alone exhibited no fungicidal activity. Further investigation of the preservative formulation is currently being carried out by evaluating field test stakes from an ongoing graveyard trial.
S R Przewloka, J A Hann, P Vinden


Leaching of the new boron based biocide from coated wood
2001 - IRG/WP 01-30267
We investigated leachability of the new boron based biocide - a complex of an amine and boric acid - from vacuum impregnated spruce wood samples. It was determined by the standard ENV 1250-2 procedure that the new biocide is susceptible to leaching so from the water borne as well as from the ethanol borne boron containing preservative treated wood. Leaching may be retarded by application of surface coatings. The ability of a surface finish to prevent leaching is correlated to its water vapour permeability.
M Petric, M Pavlic, F Cadez


A new wood preservative based on polymerized complexes of aminotriazole with copper acetate
1998 - IRG/WP 98-30169
This paper presents the results of preliminary fungitoxicity tests as carried out on new polymerized complexes of aminotriazole with copper acetate (PCC) against Coniophora puteana and Trichoderma viride. Laboratory tests on wood confirmed the findings arrived at in the screening test on agar medium. Deep penetration into pine wood of compounds studied was observed and particularly so at humidity above the point of fiber saturation (up to 10 mm in manual treatment), as well as good fixation in wood. Together with quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC) a strong synergistic effect towards the microorganisms tested was evident. The formulations investigated in the present study seem promising for future use in the wood preservation. Their practical implementation may enable effective control of wood destroying agents.
K J Krajewski, A Lukasiewicz, J Wazny


Boron treatments for the preservation of wood - A review of efficacy data for fungi and termites
1994 - IRG/WP 94-30037
Boron treatments have been used for many decades for protection of timber from biological attack and also as a fire retardant treatment. In recent years there has been an increased interest in boron treatments as an option for protection of structural timbers' e.g. timber framing used in termite risk areas. This paper reviews efficacy data for both fungi and termites relevant to this end-use.
J A Drysdale


Water-based wood preservatives for curative treatement of insect-infested spruce constructions
1998 - IRG/WP 98-30171
On laying down sanitation measures for wooden constructions infested by wood boring insects, we must take into account static risks for the construction - and, thus, for the security of the user - as well as risks for humans and environment due to the chemical preservative compounds of the treated wood. Analyses on many roof constructions made with spruce (Picea abies L.) have revealed that Hylotrupes bajulus L. and Anobium punctatum De Geer have not the significance given to them for decennies. That often allows to replace solvant-based with water-based wood preservatives in old buildings, for the protection of humans and environment. Therefore, a method has been developed in Switzerland for testing wood preservatives with delayed curative efficacy against the house longhorn beetle. Like the European Anobium Standard EN 370 this method intends to prevent the emergence of Hylotrupes beetles. Laboratory tests with diverse water-based wood preservatives available on the market in Switzerland have shown that particularly boron and benzoylphenylurea derivatives containing products get a sufficient penetration in the wood and prevent the emergence of the beetles.
E Graf, P Manser, B Lanz


Copper based water-borne preservatives: The biological performance of wood treated with various formulations
1987 - IRG/WP 3451
Wood samples treated with the various components of CCA preservative singly and in combination were tested against a soft rot organism, a copper tolerant brown rot organism and in soil burial both unleached and after leaching. The results suggest that, of the elements tested, fixed copper is essential for preventing soft rot attack and fixed arsenic is essential for preventing attack by a copper tolerant brown rot organism in leaching environments.
S M Gray, D J Dickinson


Interaction mechanisms of F/Cr/As/B type preservative and wood
1981 - IRG/WP 3183
The paper reports results of investigations on the fixation of the components of a F/Cr/As/B preservative in wood and its lignin and cellulosic components.
N Ermush, I Andersone


HCB - a new preservative combination for wood pole maintenance
1996 - IRG/WP 96-30122
New combination of heavy creosoted boron (HCB) applied on hardwood and softwood logs at different moisture content revealed successful diffusion of boron in all sapwoods within 7 days and in all sapwoods plus hardwoods within 15 days. The new cost effective paste sterilizes wood through diffusion and suitable for pole maintenance at groundline and above groundline e.g. cut ends, drilled holes, woodpecker's holes etc.
A K Lahiry


Evaluation of a solid remedial wood preservative containing boron and fluorine
1993 - IRG/WP 93-30022
The fungicidal and termiticidal effectiveness of a new rod form of diffusible remedial wood preservative, containing disodium octaborate tetrahydrate/sodium fluoride and marketed as Polesaver Rod, was evaluated in laboratory tests against three species of basidiomycete fungi (Coniophora olivacea, Pycnoporus coccineus, Perenniporia tephropora) and two species of subterranean termites (Coptotermes acinaciformis, Mastotermes darwiniensis). The rods were dissolved in water and various dilutions were used to treat specimens of Eucalyptus regnans sapwood using a full-cell process, providing retention levels which ranged from 1.2 to 37.4 kg/m³. Soil jar decay tests have shown the remedial preservative is toxic to Coniophora olivacea and Pycnoporus coccineus at a retention of 1.2 kg/m³ solubilised total rod and 2.3 kg/m³ for Perenniporia tephropora. Mean% mass loss data showed that a retention between 2.3 and 4.7 kg/m³ was necessary to protect specimens from significant attack by Coptotermes acinaciformis and between 9.3 and 18.7 kg/m³ for the more voracious Mastotermes darwiniensis. Laboratory diffusion tests on several species of eucalypt hardwoods have confirmed the capability of the preservative's active ingredients to diffuse through both heartwood and sapwood in concentrations toxic enough to inhibit fungal growth. In addition, field testing has shown that after eight months, significant radial and longitudinal diffusion of boron and fluorine was achieved from rods introduced into Eucalyptus obliqua pole stubs. Samples taken within the diffusion zone indicated loadings of up to 4.1 kg/m³ of boron and 5.2 kg/m³ of fluoride.
K J McCarthy, J W Creffield, L J Cookson, H Greaves


Vapour boron treatment of wood based panels: Further studies on mechanical properties
1993 - IRG/WP 93-30028
Samples of medium density fibreboard, chipboard and oriented strandboard were treated to two retentions of boric acid by vapour phase methods. The results of short term mechanical tests on this material were discussed by Hashim et al. (1992). The present paper discusses results with long term studies on bending and impact resistance with panel types. Long term tests of impact resistance showed no greater reduction in toughness of treated panels compared to control panels over the test period of one year
R Hashim, R J Murphy, D J Dickinson, J Dinwoodie


Vapour boron treatment of wood based panels: Mechanism for effect upon impact resistance
1994 - IRG/WP 94-40036
Samples of medium density fibreboard, chipboard and oriented strandboard (OSB) were treated to two retentions of boric acid by a vapour phase treatment. The results of a range of mechanical tests were reported by Hashim et al. (1992, 1993) in which a small reduction in impact resistance was observed. Several investigations were carried out to study how and where this loss in impact resistance occured. Possible mechanisms for the loss in impact resistance are discussed.
R Hashim, R J Murphy, D J Dickinson, J Dinwoodie


Albumin borate: A new non-toxic, wide-spectrum, long-term wood preservative
1998 - IRG/WP 98-30167
Boron, widely recognized for its broad range of activity towards both fungi and insects and for its low mammalian toxicity, can not provide long term protection to treated timber due to its high leachability. Boron, in the form of boric acid, can be partially fixed to timber by the formation of an association with egg albumin, which is insolubilized by heat-induced coagulation. Chemical investigations on fixation mechanisms of boric acid by egg albumin indicated that both acid-base salt formation occurs, as well as the formation of boric acid-albumin complexes, depending on the boric acid/protein ratio. In treated timber, a chance in protein conformation in presence of boric acid, has been shown by scanning electron microscopy. These mechanisms, partly reversible, while greatly retarding its leaching, leave small amounts of boron free to exercice its activity when needed. Boron leaching as a function of time, appears to tend to an equilibrium value, which one differs in the case of an albumin coagulum alone from what is obtained by leaching treated wood samples. Accelerated biolocical tests using such treated timber have shown that albumin borate used as wood preservative has effectiveness against wood decay, and have durability performances comparable to those obtained with CCA.
M-F Thévenon, A Pizzi, J-P Haluk


Treatment of wood-based panel products with volatile borate
1990 - IRG/WP 3616
The paper presents recent developments in the use of volatile borate esters for the preservative treatment of wood based board materials. Several advances on previous reports are discussed. In laboratory studies, treatment times of approximately ten minutes at 20°C on boards at equilibrium moisture content provided full penetration and retentions of 1% wt/wt boric acid. Biological tests have been conducted on a wide variety of boards treated by the vapour boron method. In all cases a retention of 0.7% wt/wt boric acid gave complete protection from decay. These results are considered with regard to parallel studies on solid wood by colleagues at the Forest Research Institute, Rotorua. The advantages of vapour boron treatment for wood based board materials are discussed.
P Turner, R J Murphy, D J Dickinson


Assessment of the toxicity of some copper-, zinc- and boron-based wood preservatives to the cellar fungus Coniophora cerebella Schröet
1974 - IRG/WP 242
This article reports the use of a method based on the determination of the probability of the protection of timber against destruction by fungi. By converting the probability values to probit values and plotting them as a function of the amount of preservative retained in the timber, curves of the toxic effect are obtained, enabling any timber protection probability to be assessed.
V N Sozonova, D A Belenkov


Natural exposure weathering tests: Their role in the assessment of wood preservative efficacy
1993 - IRG/WP 93-20006
Previous work has demonstrated the potential and usefulness of natural ageing procedures in e evaluation of wood preservative efficacy. This results from the combination of physico-chemical influences and microbiological interactions with both substrate and wood preservative. In this paper, results are presented for a range of biocide types. Discussions are centred on the value of natural exposure weathering tests for preservative efficacy assessment and the importance of biological persistence in the design of effective wood preservatives.
G R Williams, J Brown


Determination of total fluoride and boron in preservative-treated wood fluoride by ion selective electrode without steam distillation, and boron colorimetrically using azornethine-h
1998 - IRG/WP 98-20135
An analytical method was developed to determine total fluoride and boron in wood treated with aqueous or solid diffusing fluoride or borate-fluoride formulations. Ground wood was mixed with 30% sodium hydroxide solution and oven-dried for 2 hours before furnacing at 600° C for 1 hour. The cool fused product was dissolved in hot water, transferred to a plastic beaker and neutralised. Fluoride was measured by ion-selective electrode (ISE), after adding Ionic Strength Adjustment Buffers (ISAB), against appropriately pH and matrix-matched calibration standards containing 1, 3, 5, 10 and 50 ppm F. Boron was determined colorimetrically on the same neutralised solution using azomethine-H chemistry. Citric acid, sulphuric acid and nitric acid were evaluated as neutralising agents. While the choice of neutralising acid had no significant influence on the determination of boron by azomethine-H, speed and stability of the ISE for fluoride was best with nitric acid at 3.75M. The ISABs Sulphosalicylic acid and EDTA (SSA-EDTA); tri-sodium citrate and potassium nitrate; tiron and sodium nitrate; and TISAB were all evaluated for fluoride determination. Only SSA-EDTA was found to complex aluminium adequately, also accommodating borate, silicate and iron. Although SSA-EDTA has been traditionally used at pH 9.5 for the determination of fluoride in large amounts of aluminium, we found that use at this pH led to significant problems from hydroxide ion interference, slow electrode response, and pH changes due to loss of ammonia, all resulting in poor detection limits and reproducibility. To improve method performance, the pH of standards and samples was adjusted to 8.7, and all samples were spiked with an additional 1 mg/L fluoride. Interference from aluminium increased marginally, but the SSA-EDTA buffer was still capable of masking aluminium at a ratio of 20:1 AI:F, when measuring solutions containing 5 mg(F)/L. The method compared favourably with two alternatives; one employed the time-consuming distillation step included in the AWPA A2-1994 method, with a titration finish, and the second employed a double fusion and ISE finish, using TISAB buffer. Mean recovery from spiked Tasmanian oak (Eucalyptus regnans) at 0.05% - 0.20% m/m B/F was 95-105%. Precision at 0.2% m/m B/F in wood was about 3% for F and 1% for B. Detection limits of 30 mg/Kg for F and 20 mg/Kg for B were adequate for monitoring movement of toxicants within remedially-treated hardwood poles.
P A Collins, M J Kennedy


Observations on the performance of copper-based wood preservatives in fungal cellar (soil-bed) tests
1994 - IRG/WP 94-20047
Fungal cellar (soil-bed) tests are considered to be an important tool for the evaluation of the performance of ground contact wood preservatives. Facilities of this type have been established world wide although caution has been exercised in their introduction into standard testing methods for the approval of wood preservatives. This is the result of concerns over the variability in the biological activity between different facilities, and thereafter the determination of effective preservative retentions. This paper presents results of tests on copper based wood preservatives from four different fungal cellar facilities. The results show consistent trends in preservative performance and the high decay rates demonstrate the value of this type of test in determining the potential of new wood preservatives for long term protection in ground contact.
G R Williams, D Rudolph, M E Hedley, J A Drysdale, R F Fox


Effect of vapour boron treatment on mechanical properties of wood based board materials
1992 - IRG/WP 92-3727
The mechanical properties of Medium density fibre board, Chipboard and Oriented strand board were investigated after treatment to two retention levels of boric acid applied as a vapour phase system. A range of mechanical properties were investigated. The vapour boron treatment does not have any significant effect on most of the mechanical properties of the boards. The exception is a reduction in impact strength especially at the higher retention level.
R Hashim, D J Dickinson, R J Murphy, J Dinwoodie


New boron-based biocides for the protection of wood
2002 - IRG/WP 02-30283
Boric acid and other simple inorganic oxides of boron are amongst the oldest wood preservatives currently in use. Their relatively low toxicity and broad-spectrum activity are just some of their desirable characteristics. The primary disadvantage associated with conventional boron-based preservatives is their lack of permanence in exposed applications. A collaborative project between CSIRO and the Centre for Green Chemistry is developing new complexes for wood protection based on boron. The approach involves the binding of boron with specifically designed ligands that interact with the wood constituents to reduce leaching. Accelerated weathering trials and cellulose paper bioassays have been used as a means of assessing the performance of large numbers of complexes, and building up qualitative structure-property and structure-activity relationships. The results obtained to date have been promising, with significant improvement in leach resistance and increased biological activity. This paper will discuss the approach adopted and the results obtained thus far. For reasons of confidentiality, some details of the complexes cannot be disclosed.
D G Humphrey, P J Duggan, E M Tyndall, J M Carr, L J Cookson


Environmental fate of copper-based wood preservatives in different soil substrates - Part 1: Screening of the metal adsorption potential
1998 - IRG/WP 98-50101-21 a
In treatment plants, spillage of wood preservatives onto soil may be of environmental concern. This potential soil contamination served as an objective for a screening study. Three different mineral soils, a mineral substrate and two horticultural substrates are examined for their sorptive potential of copper through mixing with wood preservative solutions. Depending on the soil/substrate characteristics and the chemical nature of the preservatives used, copper is adsorbed to a higher extent with increasing concentration of the test solution. Soils with low organic matter and clay content show an upper limit of adsorption, irrespective of the product tested. The other soil types clearly exhibit a levelling-out effect from 2 to 4 hours on, often correlating with the initial metal concentration of the product though dependent on the chemical nature and buffering capacity of the active ingredients.
G M F Van Eetvelde, J M Mwangi, F Tack, R Hartmann, M Stevens


Applicability of supercritical carbon dioxide to the preservative treatment of wood-based composites
2001 - IRG/WP 01-40199
Treatability of five structural-use wood-based composites (medium density fiberboard, hardwood plywood, softwood plywood, particleboard and oriented strand board) was evaluated when supercritical (SC) carbon dioxide (CO2) was used as a carrier solvent. Treatments were conducted at three temperature 32 levels (25, 35 and 45°C) and two pressure levels [80 kgf/cm2 (7,845 kPa) and 120 kgf/cm2 (11,768 kPa)]. Although small changes in weight and thickness of the wood-based composites were caused by treatments with SC-CO2, all treated materials did not sustain any physical damage. These results suggest that the treatment conditions provided the immediate penetration of SC-CO2 into the wood-based composites without any critical pressure gradient between outer and inner zones. Strength properties of the treated wood-based composites significantly improved after treatments in most cases. In contrast, a remarkable drop in strength properties occurred in oriented strand board specimens. Further studies are underway to determine the optimum treatment conditions using biocides incorporated into the mixing or treating vessel.
M Muin, A Adachi, K Tsunoda


Results on field stake tests against termite – Maximum for 8 years examination at Kumamoto in Japan
2003 - IRG/WP 03-10463
Various preservative treated or modified wood and charcoal painting stakes were tested in field, maximum for eight years in Kumamoto, distributed two main termite species, Coptotermes formosanus and Reticulitermes speratus. After two years in field, untreated sapwood of sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) were observed severe attacks by termites, but the preservative treated stakes were observed no significant attacks by termites. After eight years experiment, treated stakes with preservatives not included copper, like DDAC and zinc-naphthenate, were observed slight or moderate attacks by termites. Otherwise, in the case of treated stakes with preservatives included copper, like ACQ, copper naphthenate and Tanalith CuAz, no significant attacks by termites were observed. Few samples of chemically modified wood or LVL were observed slight attacks by termites for seven years.
K Suzuki


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