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Electrodialytic remediation of creosote and CCA treated timber wastes
2002 - IRG/WP 02-50190
There is a growing concern about the environmental issue of impregnated timber waste management, since an increase in the amount of waste of treated wood is expected over the next decades. Presently, no well-documented treatment technique is yet available for this type of waste. Alternative options concerning the disposal of treated wood are becoming more attractive to study, especially the ones that may promote its re-use. Inside this approach, the electrodialytic process (ED) seems a promising technique for removal of preservative chemicals from treated wood waste. The method uses a direct electric current and its effects in the matrix as the “cleaning agent”, combining the electrokinetic movement (mainly due to electromigration, but also electro-osmosis and electrophoresis), with the principle of electrodialysis. This work reports results from the application of the electrodialytic process to an out-of-service Portuguese creosote and CCA-treated Pinus pinaster Ait. railway sleeper and pole. The behaviour of the process is described and the main results discussed. The average removal rate, estimated in accordance with prEN 12490, for creosote from treated timber waste was around 40 %.. For CCA treated timber waste, experimental conditions that could optimise the process efficiency (e.g. current density, time) were studied. The highest removal rates obtained until now, in our studies, were 93 % of Cu, 95 % of Cr and 99 % of As for sawdust using 2.5 % oxalic acid (w/w) as the assisting agent. For CCA treated wood waste in the form of chips, the best removal rates obtained until now were 84 % of Cu, 91 % of Cr and 97 % of As.
E P Mateus, A B Ribeiro, L Ottosen


Possible regulatory status of treated wood waste and implications
1998 - IRG/WP 98-50101-07
In relation to the European Community or the French regulations, treated wood waste can get two different regulatory status: <<recycled product or fuel>> or <<waste>>. Then, into the waste status, two categories are possible for these residues: <<domestic waste and assimilated>> or <<hazardous waste>>. These different status and categories are important for the environmental issue of treated wood waste management. But they also can have strong economical implications, linked to the waste management cost on one hand and on the materials image on the other hand. On the basis of the EC regulations, up to now, no treated wood waste is namely quoted as <<hazardous waste>>. However, through the classification criteria defined by different EC directives, creosote or heavy metals treated wood waste could be to considered that way. The technical arguments for such a classification and the practical implications are discussed.
G Deroubaix


Disposal of treated wood - Canada
1990 - IRG/WP 3563
It is estimated that treated wood removed from service each year in Canada contains about 16,000 tonnes of creosote, 1000 tonnes of pentachlorophenol and 245 tonnes of CCA or ACA. The amount of CCA treated wood for disposal is expected to increase more than ten-fold by the year 2020. At present, most treated wood is disposed of in landfills, burned (creosote only) or recycled as other products. Other approaches to reduction, reuse, recycling and disposal are discussed.
P A Cooper


Restriction for use and waste management for pressure treated wood - The current situation in Norway
2001 - IRG/WP 01-50175
The Norwegian Environmental Authorities have this winter sent out a draft on restrictions in production and use of heavy metals in preservative treated timber. If it is passed, it will lead to drastic changes in the use of preservatives in Norway from this autumn. The environmental authorities and the preservative industry are both at present discussing waste management for CCA and creosote treated wood.
F G Evans


Feasibility study for a dedicated pressure treated wood waste management system
2005 - IRG/WP 05-50224-22
For the creosote treated wood coming out of service, it has been estimated an amount of 200 000 t per year for the next twenty years, and 100 000 t per year afterwards. With a limited number of actors, mainly SNCF (as producer and as user), no importations, and available energy recovery options, it appears possible for setting a dedicated wood waste management system, if the SNCF agrees to. For the CCA treated wood, the amount of it coming out of service will increase and will be much more important, reaching about 400 000 t per year. For setting a voluntary dedicated waste management system might be much more difficult, because the importation is very important (about 50%), the margin of product low and the actors and users are numerous. Over the answer of the question on the feasibility for setting a dedicated pressure treated wood waste management system, this study must allow also define the priority actions to improve the pressure treated wood waste management.
C Cornillier, I Buda, E Heisel, G Labat


An evaluation of the potential of ion mobility spectrometry for detection of organic wood preservative components in solutions and treated wood
1994 - IRG/WP 94-20038
For the disposal of wood waste under ecological sound conditions information about its hazardous potential is required. Until now, no highly sensitive rapid analytical methods are available for the detection of wood preservatives under industrial process conditions. Preliminary experiments showed that Ion Mobility Spectrometry (IMS) could be a promising method for rapid detection of organic preservatives in waste wood. A number of organic wood preservatives (i.e. Al-HDO, Quat, Armoblen, Azaconzole, HCH, Creosote, DCFN, Furmecylox, MBT, Methyl-parathion, PCP, Permethrin, K-o-PP, TBTO, TCMTB and Tebuconazole) was studied. Both solutions and treated wood samples were analyzed with IMS. IMS-spectra are generated by analyzing the ionized volatile compounds of the samples. The time each ion needs to proceed to a detector is specific and can be characterized by a comparable Ko value, the so-called reduced mobility constant. A &apos;fingerprint&apos; of the wood and the chemicals is obtained. IMS was able to distinguish between most of the preservatives. However, in wood, some of the chemicals could not be determined. So far the results are provisional and further investigation is needed.
A Voss, J N R Ruddick, W J Homan, H Militz, H Willeitner


Bioprocessing preservative-treated waste wood
2000 - IRG/WP 00-50145
Disposal of preservative-treated waste wood is a growing problem worldwide. Bioprocessing the treated wood offers one approach to waste management under certain conditions. One goal is to use wood decay fungi to reduce the volume of waste with an easily managed system in a cost-effective manner. Wood decay fungi were obtained from culture collections in the Mycology Center and Biodeterioration research unit at the USDA-FS Forest Products Laboratory (FPL), Madison, Wisconsin, and from FPL field sites. The 95 isolates had originally been taken from at least 66 sites from around the United States. Isolates were screened in a bioassay (known as the &apos;choice test&apos;) for tolerance to CCA, ACQ, creosote and pentachlorophenol. A tolerant rating was based on fungal growth toward or on treated wood, with 17 tolerant to CCA, 21 to ACQ, 12 to creosote and 5 to pentachlorophenol. Decay capacity of the tolerant isolates was determined as percent weight loss by the ASTM D-1413-76 soil bottle method. We identified 8 isolates for experiments on preservative remediation. Isolates of Meruliporia incrassata and Antrodia radiculosa gave the highest percent degradation of ACQ and CCA-treated wood. Several A. radiculosa isolates and a Neolentinus lepideus isolate grew on creosote-treated wood, but had only a 4-5% weight loss. In this paper we discuss the potential use of decay fungi to degrade or remediate preservative-treated wood.
B Illman, V W Yang, L Ferge


Biological screening assays of wood samples treated with creosote plus chemical additives exposed to Limnoria tripunctata
1980 - IRG/WP 408
Laboratory methods for exposure of treated wood coupons to Limnoria tripunctata are described. Chemical additions to creosote were screened using this method. Three pesticides, Endrin, Kepone, and Malathion proved particularly effective. The addition of varying percentages of naphthalene to creosote using several treatment methods are currently being assayed. Results to date show that the coupons treated by the empty cell method have better performance than those prepared by the toluene dilution method. The naphthalene coupons treated by the full cell method show no attack after six months&apos; exposure.
B R Richards, D A Webb


Preservative-treated wood as a component in the recovered wood stream in Europe – A quantitative and qualitative review
2004 - IRG/WP 04-50218
Wood preservatives have been used for the protection of timber products in the European market in appreciable quantities for about 100 years. Between the 1960s up to the present day this usage has been particularly noticeable. The aim of this paper is to present quantitative and qualitative data on the volumes of preservative treated wood placed on the market in the UK and Sweden and to evaluate the expected quantities of preservative treated wood coming out of service and into the ‘recovered’ wood stream in the future. Data are presented from a case-study in the UK on CCA (copper, chromium, arsenic) treated timber and projections on likely amounts of this entering the recovery stream up to 2061. It is estimated that in the UK in 2001 approximately 62,000m3 of CCA-treated wood required disposal and that this could rise to about 870,000m3 by 2061. The proportion of CCA-treated timber in all post consumer waste wood in the UK is predicted to rise from about 0.9% in 2001, to about 12.3% in 2061 representing a substantial component of the post-consumer wood stream. In Sweden statistics have been compiled for production of preservative treated wood for many years. The preservatives used for waterborne treatments have also changed significantly over the last 10 years from a dominant role for CCA to alternative, As-free systems. It is estimated that preservative treated wood will represent on average about 5% of the recovered wood flow in Sweden over the next 25-30 years and that this will represent an appearance of about 8000 tonnes of As, 7000 tonnes of Cu and 6500 tonnes of Cr. These data and the possible disposal options for CCA and similar treated wood are considered in a life-cycle thinking context.
R J Murphy, P Mc Quillan, J Jermer, R-D Peek


Current and future options for managing used preservative-treated wood
1995 - IRG/WP 95-50042
The amount of preservative-treated wood available for disposal will continue to increase exponentially in the next several decades as landfill availability declines. At the same time, recent legal ruling on competitiveness among utilities and disposal of ash has clouded the economic outlook for combustion of treated wood for energy recovery. This report identifies current and future options for managing used preservative-treated wood, as well as technological and environmental/regulatory limitations to these options. Re-use, recycling (particularly through the manufacture of wood-based composites), and biodegradation are described as primary alternatives to land disposal and combustion. The report also describes supporting technologies (analytical methods and comminution) for managing used treated wood.
R C De Groot, C Felton


Biodegradation of creosote/naphthalene-treated wood in the marine environment
1977 - IRG/WP 428
The present study was undertaken to determine the biodegradability of marine grade creosote and selected components, including naphtalene, and to determine the effectiveness of (up to 40%) creosote in protecting wood from microbial attack. Also, the impact(s) of creosote and naphtalene-enriched creosote on the microbial ecology os estuarine environments was examined.
P A Seesman, R R Colwell, A Zachary, A J Emery


An Australian test of wood preservatives. - Part IV: The condition, after 35 years' exposure, of stakes treated with creosote oils and oilborne preservatives
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30241
This paper contains the first results dealing with creosote oils and oilborne preservatives from this in-ground field trial in Australia. The substrates impregnated with preservative were Pinus radiata D. Don sapwood and Eucalyptus regnans F. Muell. heartwood and sapwood. Data are reported from stakes exposed for 35 years at three Australian sites (Innisfail, Sydney, Walpeup). Comparisons were made between preservatives impregnated into P. radiata at 128 kg/m³ and exposed at Sydney. After 35 years, the mean condition of stakes treated with British standard, Australian K.55 (blend) and brown coal tar (high residue) creosote oils were serviceable. The mean condition of stakes treated with USA standard (AWPA P.1), Australian K.55 (ii, old Timbrol) and brown coal tar (distillate) creosote oils was unserviceable (ie. rated 3 or less out of 8). When a proportion of Australian K.55 (blend) creosote oil was replaced by furnace oil, vertical retort tar or 2.5% pentachlorophenol (PCP) in furnace oil, the new combinations did not, on average, rate as highly as the Australian K.55 (blend) creosote oil by itself. PCP was compared at 6.4 kg/m³ in P. radiata at Sydney. 5% PCP in furnace oil (128 kg/m³) performed as well as Australian K.55 (blend) creosote oil and much better than 5% PCP in diesel fuel oil (128 kg/m³). 2.5% PCP in furnace oil (256 kg/m³) rated the highest of any treatment containing 6.4 kg/m³ of PCP. The addition of dieldrin or chlordane improved the efficacy of 2.5% PCP in furnace oil (128 kg/m³) at Sydney, but not at Innisfail. The addition of benzene hexachloride showed greater protection than dieldrin or chlordane.
G C Johnson, J D Thornton


Creosote movement from treated wood immersed in fresh water: Initial PAH migration
2003 - IRG/WP 03-50201
Creosote has a long history of successful use as a wood preservative, but polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in this preservative have raised environmental concerns, particularly when creosote-treated wood is used in aquatic environments. A number of models have been developed to predict the risk of creosote use in aquatic environments, but one limitation of these models is a lack of data on the initial rates of creosote migration from treated wood. We examined the effect of flow rates on creosote migration from freshly treated wood immersed in fresh water. Creosote component levels declined to a steady state within 7 days, suggesting that creosote migration decreased sharply after an initial spike. The data will be used to enhance existing predictive models.
Sung-Mo Kang, J J Morrell, J Simonsen, S T Lebow


Wood preservation and the environment: A Canadian perspective
1990 - IRG/WP 3577
The non-pressure (surface) and pressure treatment of wood impacts on the environment in four ways. These are: through the production of treated wood at sawmills and pressure treating facilities; during the storage of treated wood prior to use; when the pressure treated wood is placed in service; and finally, when the treated product reaches the end of its useful life and must be disposed. By reference to current and past Canadian wood preserving practices, the impact of concern by environmentalists on future directions for the wood preserving industry is reviewed. "Information gaps" are identified, which must be filled if the general public&apos;s perception of wood preservation as being beneficial to society is to be maintained. The need for internationally agreed criteria for the approval of new preservatives is also identified.
J N R Ruddick


Pyrolytic treatment of CCB treated wood
2005 - IRG/WP 05-50224-23
Environmental problems caused by the toxicity of metallic elements of the preservative occur when treated wood comes to end of use. In the experiment, CCB treated wood chips were pyrolysed at various temperatures and residence times and the behaviour of boron, chromium and copper was observed. The three elements are almost entirely retained in the charcoal. There is no influence of final temperature and residence time on the chromium and copper retention (% weight). For temperature higher than 300 °C, a 15 % loss of boron relatively to copper is observed when the residence time goes from 15 to 30 minutes.
J F Collin, C G Jung, J M Romnée, J Delcarte


Experience with an industrial scale-up for the biological purification of CCA-treated wood waste
1997 - IRG/WP 97-50095
The biological purification of CCA-treated wood waste was tested in co-operation of the BFH and the Italian impregnation plant SoFoMe. Chipped poles were infested with the chromium and arsenic tolerant brown-rot fungus Antrodia vaillantii which can transform in the laboratory ca. 90% of the chromium and arsenic into watersoluble salts. These can be leached to 100-200 ppm residual metal content. The fermentation techniques tested will be described and the fermentation success as well as the possible use of the purified material will be discussed.
H Leithoff, R-D Peek


Disposal of CCA treated waste wood by combustion - An industrial scale trial
1996 - IRG/WP 96-50068
Totally 272 m³ (62.7 t) of CCA treated utility poles were chipped and incinerated at Jalasjärvi Gasification Plant. In average the whole batch of chips contained 57 kg of elementary copper, 95 kg chromium and 76 kg arsenic. During the 56 h combustion trial the measured arsenic emission to the air was 76 g in total. Copper and chromium emission was less than 1 g. The condensing water from the cooling unit and the ash from the gasifier were collected and transported to Outokumpu Harjavalta Metals Oy and finally circulated through a copper refinery line.
A J Nurmi


Laboratory simulation of leaching from creosote treated wood in aquatic exposures
2000 - IRG/WP 00-50157
Creosote has a long history of use as a preservative particularly in industrial wood products, but its use has come under increasing scrutiny as a result of concerns about its potential effects on aquatic and terrestrial non-target organisms. Despite its long use, there is relatively little data on the rates of creosote loss in many exposures. In this report, we describe small scale leaching tank procedures for evaluating migration from creosote-treated Douglas-fir lumber exposed at 35°C under 0 flow rate conditions. Creosote component concentrations in the water column were quantified using solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography. As expected, migration rates were higher for lower boiling point fractions. Leaching in the first eight hours followed a linear relationship for acenaphthene, dibenzofuran, fluorene, phenanthrene and fluoranthene. Chemical concentrations arrived at a steady state after 24 hrs of leaching. Concentrations of all creosote components tested tended to be lower than their reported water solubilities, suggesting that other factors were influencing migration. Further analyses of the leaching system are planned. The results will be used to expand a model that simulates creosote loss from treated wood in flowing fresh water.
Ying Xiao, J Simonsen, J J Morrell


Alternative technologies for wood wastes recycling - Part B: Biotreatment of PCP- and creosote-treated wood
1998 - IRG/WP 98-50101-18 b
Alternative technologies have been investigated to detoxify treated wood. Two classes of organic compounds are studied. Creosote-treated wood are classified in France as dangerous wood wastes. A conventional incineration could be provided for these wood wastes but the cost of this elimination could be very high (> 2000 FFR/ton). For these reasons, we have tested two kinds of new processes as alternative ways. The developed strategy is described in this paper and illustrated by a few examples. Part B - The second one is based on an oxidative degradation of organic compounds directly in the wood: oxidative degradation by fungi. Few examples are presented in this paper. Three fungi are tested directly on treated wood. High levels of contaminants are tested around 0.6 g of PCP/kg and 3.7 g of 8 PAH/kg of wood. Few oxidation products generated by this biological treatment are identified. An ecotoxicological assessment is performed to validate this process. Technical feasibility of these developed processes as well as economic aspects are discussed,
S Legay, P Marchal, G Labat


Assessment of dehydrogenase activity, fluoride content and total chromium content of soil profiles exposed to preservative treated wood within a model system
1993 - IRG/WP 93-10015
The development and prospective use of a closed model system to facilitate study of a number of indicators of environmental impact of wood preservatives laboratory conditions has been described (IRG/WP/2395-92). Chemical analysis of leachate samples collected from drained soil profiles containing creosoted pole sections remedially treated with a chromated fluoride preservative indicated small increases in fluoride and chromium concentrations. This paper details measurement of dehydrogenase activity and chemical analysis of soil samples recovered from the surface layers of the model soil profiles adjacent to treated pole sections. Reduced levels of dehydrogenase activity were associated with increased soil concentrations of leached preservative components and lower organic matter content. Findings are discussed as part of an assessment of environmental impact of the remedial treatment in the field
G M Smith, D C R Sinclair, A Bruce, H J Staines


Removal of CCA from Spent CCA-Treated Wood
2002 - IRG/WP 02-50192
A novel method for the removal of CCA components from spent CCA-treated wood has been developed. The CCA-treated wood was first converted into liquid in the presence of polyethylene glycol and glycerin at mild temperatures (120 – 150 0C) by using sulfuric acid as catalyst. The resulting viscous liquefied wood was then resolved in acetone/water solvent. The hazardous components (i.e., Cr, As, and Cu) in the solution were then removed through precipitation by addition of complexing agents. It was found that more than 85% of CCA could be removed from spent CCA-treated wood. The detoxified wood can be used as chemicals for the preparation of polyurethane materials and the recovered CCA can be reused in the CCA wood treatment industries.
Lianzhen Lin, Chung-Yun Hse


Initial results and observations of a model system to assess the efficacy and environmetal impact of preservative treated wood
1993 - IRG/WP 93-50001-02
The development of a closed model system for the laboratory assessment of the efficacy and environmental impact of a chromated fluoride remedial treatment for creosoted distribution poles has been described (IRG/WP/2395-92). The model consists of a precipitation apparatus above a treated pole section positioned in a soil profile from which leachate was collected via a series of simulated field drains. Chemical analyses of leachate and soil provided data indicating movement of toxic preservative constituents from the treated pole section to the model environment. These data were complemented by physical and chemical analysis of a sward of perennial ryegrass supported by the soil profile. This paper reports initial results and observations in terms of the models&apos; suitability for assessment purposes. The advantages of the model system over traditional field studies are discussed.
D C R Sinclair, G M Smith, A Bruce, H J Staines


Evaluation of fungal remediation of creosote treated wood
1998 - IRG/WP 98-50101-25
Biotechnological remediation of creosote treated wood may be of interest in connection with novel recycling processes. White rot fungi and/or their ligninolytic enzyme systems are supposed to be valuable tools for such processes. This paper reports about results achieved when creosoted wood was treated in solid substrate fermentation with selected white rot fungi after different extraction procedures. None of different optimized fermentation conditions enabled the colonization of creosoted wood. The minimal inhibitory concentration for fungi was found to be about one power of ten below the actual concentration in railway sleepers. The efficiency of various solvents to extract creosote below the MIC for fungi was investigated. When 16 PAHs were analysed by HPLC under growth conditions, the best fungal strain degraded 100% of the low molecular weight PAHs and 92% of the 4-5 ring PAHs after 16 days. The lowest reduction was found to be 79% for benzo(b)fluoranthene. The results are discussed with respect to the application of white rot fungi for technical processes in combination with novel recycling methods for creosote treated wood.
K Messner, S Böhmer


Management of treated wood waste in Canada - Technical and regulatory solutions
2001 - IRG/WP 01-50166-15
A major problem facing the wood preservation industry in Canada is the management of wastes. This refers to wastes generated during the treatment process as well as waste treated wood that is removed from service. The volume of oil borne preservative treated industrial products to be removed from service in Canada over the next 20 years is expected to be fairly constant at approximately 350,000 to 400,000 cubic metres (m3) per year. On the other hand CCA treated removals will increase from 112,000 m3 in the year 2000 to approximately 480,000 m3 in 2020. Current management practices for industrial product removals are reuse, recycling as wood and fibre, energy recovery in industrial combustion systems and land filling. The expected increase in the volume of waste CCA-treated industrial material represents a major disposal challenge. The volume of CCA treated consumer products to be removed from service over the next 20 years is expected to increase dramatically from approximately 75,000 m3 in the year 2000 to in excess of 1 million m3 in 2020. At present, the only practical disposal methods for this material are land filling and limited reuse. For the foreseeable future, management practices such as reuse, recycling and energy recovery in industrial combustion systems such as large power boilers and cement kilns, appear to be practical and economically feasible for oil borne preservative-treated products. Furthermore, the owners of these products are motivated to pursue responsible disposal methods in order to avoid the increasing cost of land filling. In the case of CCA-treated consumer products, the waste material is widely distributed in residential areas. Individual homeowners have no commitment to responsible disposal and in fact, in many cases, may not even be aware that they have CCA-treated wood on their property. The identification, collection, storage and disposal of this material represent major problems due to the growth in volume that is forecasted. This paper presents the current situation that the wood preservation sector is facing in Canada with respect to the management of wastes and discusses both the technical and regulatory options that are being explored and implemented.
B Munson


Utility pole recycling and disposal in Eastern Canada
1990 - IRG/WP 3587
Increasing public awareness, prompted by environmental groups such as Greenpeace, concerning the use and disposal of treated wood is becoming a serious issue in Canada. Producers and user groups of treated Pentachlorophenol (PCP) utility poles are at the forefront of public, government and media attention. If, as expected, further limitations on the use and disposal of PCP by the public are imposed, the producers and users of this material will have to find alternative means of the means of pole disposal.
S D Henry


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