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Superior kempas hardwood protection with two proprietary microemulsion termiticdes based on permethrin and cyermethrin against Coptotermes termite attack under H2 an H3 weathered conditions found in buildings
2018 - IRG/WP 18-10931
SARPECO® and AXIL® solutions are water-based wood preservatives approved for dipping treatment providing 25 years of termite protection for solid wood and wood-based products in Europe and for more than 10 years in Indonesia. SARPECO® and AXIL® solutions are patented formulations based on concentrated microemulsions (ME) diluted with water as a dipping treatment but also for vacuum pressure treatment. Field trials conducted in Malaysia by UNIMAS confirmed the efficacy of SARPECO® and AXIL® solutions at three product concentrations on short dip-treated kempas (Koompassia malaccensis) heartwood, a major hardwood species in the Malaysian wood construction market, against the Southeastern Asian subterranean termite Coptotermes curvignathus exposed to aboveground H2 (indoor, non-wetting conditions) hazard class targeting termites compared to CCA-treated kempas and radiata pine (Pinus radiata) sapwood. Prior to the H2 hazard class termite field test exposure, treated wood blocks were conditioned to either a non-leaching volatilization (H2 hazard class weathered wood blocks) or to a leaching followed by volatilization (H3 hazard class weathered blocks) as well as non-leaching/non-volatilization and leaching/non-volatilization reference treatments. After 6 months field exposure, untreated kempas was severely (termite ratings: 0, mean mass loss: 97.4%) or moderately attacked (mean ratings: 7.7, mean mass loss: 17.5%), while none of the leached-volatilized (H3 hazard class) or non-leached-volatilized (H2 hazard class) test blocks treated with SARPECO® and AXIL® at both target retentions were regarded as attacked (mean ratings: 9.7-10, negligible mean mass loss) regardless of applied termiticide concentration, leached or non-leached wood, volatilized or non-volatilized wood treatments. Excellent performance also prevailed with the remaining treatment combinations of treated wood. Due to their unique compositions, SARPECO® and AXIL® solutions showed excellent performance against Coptotermes curvignathus with low termiticide concentrations where conventional agro-insecticides do not work. In conclusion, SARPECO® and AXIL® are effective for wood protection in buildings against Southeast Asian Coptotermes subterranean termites.
D Messaudi, A H H Wong, C A D Tawi, N Bourguiba, O Fahy


European standardization for wood preservation
1988 - IRG/WP 2321
G Castan


European standardization for wood preservation
1989 - IRG/WP 2335
G Castan


Wood Preservation in France. A statement of quality control early 1986
1986 - IRG/WP 3389
A statement of quality control in France early 1986 - Summary of new - Standards criteria for preservatives and treated wood - Aptitude of treated wood for use per class of biological hazard
M Romeis, G Ozanne


European standardization for wood preservation
1990 - IRG/WP 2359
G Castan


Less environmental impact of wood preservatives by considering the risk of attack in addition to the hazard class system
1995 - IRG/WP 95-50040-10
Hazard classes, which are standardized in Europe in EN 335, are most useful to direct chemical wood preservation towards the organisms which may attack wood in the various fields of utilisation. However, hazard only signifies the fact that an attack may occur without considering the actual risk to attack. To minimize the application of chemicals with respect of less environmental impact it is necessary to consider both, the hazard of attack and the risk which implies the probability, how often attack may occur and how important this will be. In addition, also the consequences of the failure of a wooden commodity will influence the need of chemical wood preservation. It is therefore proposed to combine the hazard classes as specified in EN 335 or in similar non European regulations with a risk assessment including time assessment as a basis for the requirement on chemical wood preservation. For this, details are given in the paper.
H Willeitner


Japan's comments on ISO/DIS 12583-1/2
1996 - IRG/WP 96-20101
The Japanese body for ISO TC 165 can not be accepted on the adoption of ISO/DIS 12583-1/2. The comments and suggestions of Japanese body were described.
K Suzuki


Evaluation and approval of wood preservatives. Unification of European requirements
1988 - IRG/WP 2310
This paper reviews the current activities within the European Homologation Committee for Wood Preservatives (EHC) towards unification of the requirements on evaluation and approval of wood preservatives in Western European countries.
J Jermer


Work programme of CEN/TC 38 (April 1999) and European publications
1999 - IRG/WP 99-20165
Scope of the CEN/TC38: Standardization of the characteristics of natural or conferred durability of wood and its derived materials against biological agents, including the characteristics of protection products and associated processes to obtain this durability. This applies in particular to: - the identification of hazard classes-, - the test methods (wood preservatives and treated wood and wood based materials) and interpretation of the results; - the specification of wood preservatives and treated wood by classes of hazard including processes-, - quality control methods-, -terminology.
R Hüe


Towards harmonisation of regional approaches for an International Standard for the approval of wood preservatives
1997 - IRG/WP 97-20122
Recent proposals from the European Standards body (CEN) for an ISO Standard on wood preservatives has initiated debate on whether there is any prospect of an acceptable common approach among ISO member countries, to a harmonised framework of hazard classes, with agreed supporting biological tests, leading to a unified rationale for demonstrating compliance with minimum performance standards for specific preservatives in specific end-uses. This paper discusses a potential framework for developing an International Standard prescribing hazard classes and the biological test methods capable of supporting a common approach to the approval or standardisation of a wood preservative system. An approach is proposed which incorporates elements of existing standards or protocols used in Europe, Japan, Australasia, South Africa and North America based on the framework of European Standard EN599 but adopting regional variants with incorporation of field testing for the suggested Hazard Classes 2, 3, 4a, 4b and 5. The proposals are intended to initiate development of a consensus process rather than to suggest a solution in itself. However, it is hoped that the framework provided will allow the discussion process to advance more effectively and harmoniously.
A F Preston, A F Bravery


European standardization for wood preservation
1991 - IRG/WP 2365
Since the last IRG 21 conference in New-Zealand, there one meeting of the plenary committee and several meetings of working groups. The interprative documents prepared by CCE for expliciting the essential requirements of the CCE Directive on the construction products and specially: mechanical resistance and stability / hygiene, health and environment / safety in use are waited to valid the programme of work in the frame of the mandate officially received the 27th of September 1989. What is the advancement of the programme? Definition of biological hazard classes / Natural durability of wood / Treated wood / Performance of preservatives / Test methods
Anonymous


Sawn timber of fir (Abies alba Mill.) - Treatability and usability for the Hazard Classes 3 and 4
1999 - IRG/WP 99-40147
Within a national research project, tests on the treatability on sawn timber of fir (Abies alba Mill.) in oscillation pressure, vacuum pressure and double-vacuum processes have been worked out with 95 trunks taken from 3 different altitude levels (up to a height of 590 metres, 600 to 990 metres and over 1000 metres) and from 4 different regions of Switzerland. As the treatability of round wood can be compared with that of spruce (Picea abies L.), the sawn timber shows a considerably higher retention and penetration of the preservative. According to the standard EN 350.2 this wood can be classified into treatability class 2. With a vacuum pressure process a much better quality can be reached than with an oscillation pressure treatment. The treatability can be influenced by the origin of growth, as far as wet heart appears increasingly on a fir location; lumber with wet heart has a four times higher retention. The altitude of growth had no significant influence on the impregnation quality. The good retention and penetration of the preservative makes these wood species suitable for weather exposed outside constructions of solid wood or glued laminated timbers (for example bridges, acoustic and face protection walls, fences and toys). As the heartwood of fir is impregnated too, an adequate or even longer durability than with Scots pine (Pinus ssp.).can be obtained for treated construction wood.
E Graf, T Bör


Environmental situations on wood preservation industries in Japan
1995 - IRG/WP 95-50040-21
Because of environmental civil oppinions, Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries in Japan, reviesed "the standards for sawn lumber" in 1994. For the possibilities of the use of preservatives out of CCA, by the using of the hazard levels, new products like ACQ, DDAC and emulsified zinc-naphthenate can be used in the standards. Since 1994, the permitable limit of the arsenic in the waste water become severe to 0.1 mg/l, but untill Fev. 1997, it's possible to allow the level of 0.3 mg/l. The Wood Preservers Association in Japan considers the possibility by accerlated fixation of CCA for decreasing the level of the arsenic in waste water of wood preservation industries.
K Suzuki


European standardization for wood preservation. Progress report 91-92
1992 - IRG/WP 92-2398
Since the IRG 22 conference in Kyoto, CEN/TC 38 Plenary met twice in relation with several working group meetings. 5 upon 6 of the interpretative documents have been prepared by adhoc groups of the Standing Committee for Construction within the scope of the 89/106/EEC directive on Construction Products. The expected requirements attached to wood preservation are both requirements 1) and 3): 1) mechanical resistance and stability; 3) hygiene, health and the environment. A consequence should be a redrafting of the previous official mandate delivered on September 27, 1989: - direct mandate on wood (solid and reconstituted) as well as wood preservatives as construction products - horizontal joint-mandates on wooden-commodities in relation with the other TCs in charge of such commodities. Another consequence is a formal exploration by TC 38/WG 11 "Permanence of active ingredients in treated timber" through a first couple of standards entitled "methods for measuring losses of active ingredients and other preservative ingredients from treated timber - Part 1: Laboratory method for measuring losses by evaporation to air - Part 2: Laboratory method for measuring losses into fresh water or salt water". This works anticipates the mandate and means that TC 38 is currently making progress, towards air and water quality. Apart from building activities, TC 38 got also by the end of 1991 an order of standardization on Creosote, and Creosoted-timber following the 13th adaptation of 76/169/EEC Diretive Creosote specifications. This additional event results from the trend in Brussels to develop the so-called "new approach" where the EC authorities elaborates essential requirements with mandates to CEN explicit them in close cooperation with the industry.
R Hüe


Performance criteria for approving new wood preservatives for ground contact
1994 - IRG/WP 94-20021
Protocols for testing novel formulations prior to approval or registration as wood preservatives are being developed in a number of countries, e.g. Australia, New Zealand, USA. One aspect which must be addressed is the effectiveness in tests relative to that of currently approved formulations which would be acceptable to approving authorities. It is assumed that natural exposure testing is a prerequisite procedure before application for approval is sought and that a minimum exposure period of five years is required. Using CCA as a reference formulation and combined field test stake results from other copper-chrome-(non-arsenical component) formulations, performance criteria have been developed for novel formulations where approval for use in ground contact is sought.
M E Hedley


Towards a unified international hazard class system
1996 - IRG/WP 96-20081
Working party 2.5 on International Standardisation has set the development of a unified hazard class system as a short-term objective. This document is intended to stimulate the discussion required to work towards such a system. Two possible approaches are discussed, the compromise approach and the development of a basic system from first principles. For the second approach, the factors impacting on durability of wood products are examined and three factors are selected to define hazard classes. All three increase in number or severity with increasing hazard class. They are: the sources of moisture and nutrients and the inoculum potential of the primary biodeterioration agents. These describe the potential for a biodeterioration hazard. A unified international hazard class system is proposed.
P I Morris


Performance testing of DMDHEU-modified wood in Australia
2013 - IRG/WP 13-30613
Chemical wood modification with dimethyloldihydroxy-ethyleneurea (DMDHEU) or its derivatives has been researched for many years and shown to be applicable to improve certain wood properties to both solid lumber and wood-based composites. Earlier research proved a high biological resistance of DMDHEU-modified wood against biological degradation in laboratory and field tests in Europe. Due to the very different climatic conditions and test procedures in Queensland (Australia), the resistance of DMDHEU-modified wood was evaluated in field tests in Southern and Northern Queensland over a period of 5.5 years. The tests show, that in weather exposed out of ground (H3) exposure and in soil contact (H4) DMDHEU treated pine resists degradation by fungi compared to treated beech (Fagus sylvatica) which is protected only at higher chemical loadings.
H Militz, J Norton


A proposal for an international wood preservation standard
1994 - IRG/WP 94-20031
Two factors are driving the need for an international wood preservation standard. First, the global need to use our natural resources more wisely and second, the movement towards free trade exemplified by the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. The International Research Group on Wood Preservation is the ideal organisation to undertake the task of developing such a standard. This paper is intended to start this process. It attempts to bring together the best points of a number of national and international standards into a uniform format. Preservative penetrations and retentions for each commodity would be based on the hazard class/use category, the climate zone, the biological area, the natural durability of the heartwood of the species used, the service life required and the consequences of failure. The outline standard presented borrows heavily from the new European Standard and is presented as a possible starting point for the development of an international standard.
P I Morris


A note on testing the efficacy of wood preservatives above ground
1995 - IRG/WP 95-20078
A number of test methods have been used to evaluate the performance of wood preservatives in above ground situations. These have included EN 113 tests following natural exposure weathering (NEWT), L-joint or T-joint tests, lap-joint tests, and decking tests. A new test referred to as the A-frame test has been developed and is under evaluation. This is based on a sandwich-type test in which a thin (3.5 mm) sample is exposed outdoors between two untreated samples on a rack or A-frame. The advantages and disadvantages of these types of tests are discussed in a short note.
G R Williams, J A Drysdale, R F Fox


Practical consideration in developing an international hazard class standard: The hazards and risks
1996 - IRG/WP 96-20091
This paper discusses the concept of hazards and risks in relation to the way in which the hazard class philosophy may be used for international standardization. The difference between hazard and risk is considered as a basis for a simple classification of biological hazards for timber in use based upon its service environment. The paper proposes that the moderating influences within a service environment may be regarded as risks and used to classify the severity of hazard. These risks depend principally upon geographical location (climate) and design features controlled by the specifier. It is concluded that a pragmatic and simple approach could provide the best opportunity for an international agreement.
R J Orsler


Criteria for basidiomycetes testing and ways of defining natural durability classes
1998 - IRG/WP 98-20144
Within the framework of a European research project several laboratories have tested a series of 17 wood species covering the total range of natural durability. Basidiomycete tests are part of the total set up. Although generally based upon standard methods some minor differences in execution of the tests were evaluated for their impact on the results. This variation was superimposed with the fact that the tests were performed in different laboratories using wood from the same origin. Another important issue is the definition of natural durability classes for wood species starting from mass losses resulting from basidiomycete decay tests carried out under laboratory conditions. This paper summarises proposals for different ways to calculate or define the natural durability of wood and discusses some critical parameters in fungal testing, as well.
J Van Acker, M Stevens, J K Carey, R Sierra-Alvarez, H Militz, I Le Bayon, G Kleist, R-D Peek


Evaluation and approval of wood preservatives in the Nordic countries
1988 - IRG/WP 2311
This paper reviews the system for evaluating and approving the efficacy of wood preservatives for industrial use currently in force in the Nordic countries Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden.
B Henningsson, J Jermer


A risk model for termite attack in Australia
2003 - IRG/WP 03-10468
This paper describes a model to predict the risk of termite attack on a house in Australia. It is based on a survey of expert opinion and data from 5000 houses. The model gives a quantitative estimate of risk, and as such is useful for the development of risk management systems. An example of the application of such a system is given.
R H Leicester, C-H Wang, L J Cookson


Second international symposium on wood preservation "The challenge safety-environment" 8-9 February 1993, Cannes-Mandelieu, France
1993 - IRG/WP 93-50001
Contains the following 34 Documents (IRG/WP 93-50001/1 - IRG/WP 93-50001/34) and 4 abstracts: A methodology for the life-cycle assessment of treated timber products (IRG/WP 93-50001/1) Initial results and observations of a model system to assess the efficacy and environmetal impact of preservative treated wood (IRG/WP 93-50001/2) Borates as wood preservatives - an environmental, health and safety perspective (IRG/WP 93-50001/3) The shower test method. A leaching test for assessing preservative losses from treated timber under simulated open storage conditions (IRG/WP 93-50001/4) A comparative study of CCA type C and B treated poles in service (IRG/WP 93-50001/5) Laboratory experiments on aerial emissions from wood treated with wood stains (IRG/WP 93-50001/6) Depletion of preservatives from treated wood: Results from laboratory, fungus cellar and field test (IRG/WP 93-50001/7) Modelling of PCP migration in the environment: Feeding the models with laboratory data (IRG/WP 93-50001/8) Programme d'études sur le pentachlorophénol (IRG/WP 93-50001/9) Système informatisé d'aide à la décision pour la gestion de la migration du pentachlorophénol dans l'environnement (IRG/WP 93-50001/10) Health hazards and environmental aspects when using Cu-HDO-containing wood preservatives in vacuum pressure plants (IRG/WP 93-50001/11) On-site test for indicative determination of leaching of components of preservatives from treated timber (IRG/WP 93-50001/12) Assessment of losses of wood preservatives from treated wood by leaching into the environment (IRG/WP 93-50001/13) Le séchage arificiel du bois. Simple opération de traitement du metériau ou méthode douce de préservation? [Wood kiln drying. Simple process of material treament or soft method of preservation?] (IRG/WP 93-50001/14) Social and economocal impact of an extension of service life resulting of an adequate preventive treatment. Application to wooden components used in urban areas with a high density of population (IRG/WP 93-50001/15) Extending the useful life of creosoted electricity distribution poles in service (IRG/WP 93-50001/16) Utilisation industrielle du bois. Préservation de la matière première par des utilisations rationnelles successives de ses propriétés (IRG/WP 93-50001/17) The potential for reuse of treated wood poles removed from service (IRG/WP 93-50001/18) Development of a commercial-scale CCA chemical sludge recycling system (IRG/WP 93-50001/19) Persistance of active ingredients in treated wood (IRG/WP 93-50001/20) Solidification - A viable option for the safe disposal of CCA treatment plant wastes (IRG/WP 93-50001/21) Microbial decomposition of salt treated wood (IRG/WP 93-50001/22) Délavabilité de bois ronds traités avec un sel CCA dans des conditions réelles de stockage. Incidence pratique de la fixation accélérée par étuvage. Impact effectif sur l'environnement (IRG/WP 93-50001/23) The microbiological treatment of chlorophenolic preservative in spent utility poles (IRG/WP 93-50001/24) The fate of salt preservatives in facility yard soils and decontamination of soils and drainage waters (IRG/WP 93-50001/25) Decomposition of biocides in aqueous media cases of MTC and TCMTB (IRG/WP 93-50001/26) Quantification des émanations de substances dans l'air ambiant a partir des bois traités (IRG/WP 93-50001/27) A voluntary system to control the usage of wood preservatives in Austria (IRG/WP 93-50001/28) Health and safety in use of antistain chemicals (IRG/WP 93-50001/29) Dutch work programme for environmental measures in wood preserving industry (IRG/WP 93-50001/30) Dutch national environmental policy strategy (NMP): Implications throughout the life cycle of treated timber and for the Dutch preservation industry (IRG/WP 93-50001/31) Eco-tax - A new threat for wood preservation? The Belgian experience (IRG/WP 93-50001/32) Inventaire des "déchets" ou produits connexes de la filière bois (IRG/WP 93-50001/33) Trends in environmental management in industry. Implications for wood preservation activities (IRG/WP 93-50001/34)
Anonymous


Japanese Classification of Wooden Building Members for ISO Use Classes according to the Building Code in Japan.
2006 - IRG/WP 06-20337
Because of the international approve of use class system for the biological degradation of wood by ISO/DIS 21887 and ISO/DIS 21892, Japanese committee of ISO/TC165/SC1 asked to the JWPA for classify the wooden commodities by use class of these draft ISO. The JWPA was prepared a draft use class model in Japan. Japanese building code systems are described and Japanese draft use class system is also described.
K Suzuki


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