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Improved equipment and technique for high pressure sap displacement impregnation of natural round wood
1972 - IRG/WP 309
Hitherto the main problem in the practical application of high pressure sap displacement impregnation (HPSD) has been in devising a satisfactory cap. Such a cap must be easily fitted to different size log ends to give a leak proof seal. The present contribution describes a new type of cap and sealing system designed to meet these requirements.
C G W Mason, F B Shorland


Resin bleed after light organic solvent preservative treatment - the effect of drying method and process type
1986 - IRG/WP 3378
The effects of drying method and treatment process type on resin bleed were investigated. High-temperature drying of resinous radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) heartwood resulted in improved wood permeability, higher preservative uptake, and greater resin bleed when treated by the Rueping process. Resin bleed was reduced substantially when timber was treated by the Lowry process, and totally eliminated when Bethell-treated. The incorporation of 2% wax into the preservative formulation may control resin bleed after Rueping treatment.
P Vinden


The suitability of high pressure sap-displacement for the retention of UK grown spruce and pine
1990 - IRG/WP 3595
The concentration and radial distribution of copper, chrome, arsenic (CCA), and the moisture content and depth of radial checking in UK grown, field exposed spruce and pine poles treated by high pressure sap-displacement are examined. The concentration of CCA elements in samples obtained from increment cores is similar in Norway spruce, Scots pine and Corsican pine but is significantly lower in Sitka spruce. The concentration of chromium in all species, arsenic in Sitka spruce, Norway spruce and Corsican pine and copper in Sitka spruce are at a maximum in the outer sapwood and decrease centripetally with increasing core depth. In contrast, arsenic in Scots pine and Norway spruce at groundline and copper in Norway spruce, Scots pine and Corsican pine are at a maximum in the inner sapwood. The slopes of metal concentration against radial core depth are similar in Norway spruce and Scots pine but are significantly larger (steeper) and smaller (less steep) respectively in Sitka spruce and Corsican pine. Checking is more severe in Sitka spruce than in the other species and appears to be associated with steep moisture gradients. In Sitka spruce, checks penetrate the preservative treated annulus thus greatly facilitating decay since micro-organisms have access to untreated non durable wood. The results suggest that high pressure sap-displacement is suitable for the treatment and long term protection of Norway spruce, Scots pine, and Corsican pine but is inadequate for the protection of Sitka spruce. Modifications to the high pressure sap-displacement process that could improve the treatment of Sitka spruce are discussed.
P D Evans, S D Hainey, A Bruce, G M Smith, B King


Clean creosote - its development, and comparison with conventional high temperature creosote
1983 - IRG/WP 3235
Pigment emulsified creosote (PEC) is presently being tested and shows considerable stability in terms of water content, pigment level, pH, viscosity, rheological behaviour and microscopy. Timber samples from several eucalypt species have been treated with PEC and side matched samples treated with conventional high temperature creosote (HTC). The PEC treated specimens showed higher weight retentions of total preservative, (based on sapwood volume) than did the HTC treated samples. In terms of whole creosote however, retentions were not significantly different. Fuming was negligible immediately the PEC treated samples were removed from the pressure cylinder. In addition, the surface of freshly treated PEC samples was drier and much easier to handle than HTC treated samples and they remained dry even after eight months of weathering. 'Crud' formation on the surfaces of the exposed PEC samples was less than the corresponding HTC samples. There was no apparent difference in the penetration and macro-distribution of the two preservatives in the sapwood of matched samples. Full depth of sapwood penetration of both preservatives was visible.
C W Chin, J B Watkins, H Greaves


The potential of high pressure pulsation processes to treat white spruce lumber with water-borne preservatives
1988 - IRG/WP 3471
Laboratory work using end sealed 4x8x46 cm³ white spruce samples has been done to explore the suitability of three variants of a 2.1 MPa pulsation process for the impregnation of white spruce with CCA. The results showed that the process improved significantly the penetration of the preservatives and reduced significantly cell collapse, when compared with the results of treatment using a 2.1 MPa empty cell process. The comparison of the three variants indicate that the process has potential for further improvements.
J P Hösli, J N R Ruddick


Direct estimation of the durability of high-pressure steam modified wood by ESR-spectroscopy
2010 - IRG/WP 10-40508
Heat generated persistent free radicals have been detected by electron spin resonance measurement of thermally modified wood, prepared by high pressure superheated steam treatment. The specific density of these radicals have been correlated with the durability against basidiomycetes, as measured by the European standard EN113 test. In the lower range of specific radical densities, the found correlation has revealed non-specificity for six different wood species, for two different treatment intensities and within different tree zones. This result promises a great potential for electron spin resonance to estimate the durability of high pressure steam modified wood. It also provides evidence for an antioxidant mechanism, responsible for the durability enhancement in heat treated wood.
W Willems, A Tausch, H Militz


Chapter 7 - Treatment processes of bamboo
2010 - IRG/WP 07-10635-07
For adequate penetration and retention of preservatives in woody bamboos at green, dry, solid and sliced conditions different possible and applied treatment processes have been described along with their classifications. The treated bamboo can be used as building materials; the sufficient treatability ensures its long-term best utilization at ground contact and indoor. All the processes described herein are not equally applicable for all preservatives and are not equally effective for long-term uses. The combination of treatment processes and preservatives, which ensures the maximum penetration, retention and the highest degree of fixation of preservatives used, is considered the best for long-time use in ground and water. Some processes very suitable for timbers may not be suitable for bamboos due to different inborn morphological and anatomical properties in bamboo. The bamboo preservation techniques are somehow special but easy and less expensive, especially in sliced and green forms.
A K Lahiry


The effect of preservative treatment on mechanical strength and structural integrity of wood
2015 - IRG/WP 15-30667
The use of wood for demanding construction applications is increasing in Europe. Wooden constructions are frequently designed of susceptible conifer wood, which is endangered by wood decay fungi in wet applications. Therefore in many cases treating wood with preservatives is unavoidable to ensure the desired service life. However, chemical treatment of wood can result in changes of its mechanical properties. There are contradictory results published in literature regarding the influence of the various impregnation agents on relevant mechanical properties. In order to elucidate mechanical properties of impregnated wood, Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) sapwood and Norway spruce (Picea abies) wood were impregnated with a copper-ethanolamine based system, an aqueous solution of boric acid and a solvent based wood preservative. For comparison, wood samples were impregnated with deionised water. After conditioning, half of the samples were artificially aged according to the EN 84 leaching procedure. Afterwards, samples were oven dried, and their bending and compressive strength in axial and radial direction was determined. In parallel, structural integrity of the samples was determined in High-Energy Multiple Impact (HEMI) tests. The results clearly showed that treatment with wood preservatives does not have significant influence on the mechanical properties, with exception of non-aged copper-ethanolamine and boric acid treated wood that exhibited significantly lower structural integrity of wood. The negative effect on strength and structural integrity was found to be reversible through exposure to liquid water or high relative humidity.
M Humar, D Kržišnik, C Brischke


Danish wood preservatives approval system with special focus on assessment of the environmental risks associated with industrial wood preservatives
2001 - IRG/WP 01-50166-01
The following is a description of the procedure used by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency to assess the environmental risks associated with preservatives used in the pressure impregnation of wood. The risk assessment covers issues considered to be of significance for the environment and which are adequately documented so as to allow an assessment. Such issues are persistence and mobility in soils, bioaccumulation and the impact on aquatic and terrestrial organisms. Unless required in special circumstances, the assessment does not apply to birds and mammals as the normal use of preservative treated wood is not expected to involve any noteworthy exposure of these groups. Approval of wood preservatives will be based on a general assessment of the environmental risk associated with the normal use of wood treated with the preservative in a realistic worst case situation. The assessment may address other aspects such as disposal and total life cycle.
J Larsen


Status of the research and development of a new preservative system (EFPL) for pressure treatment of spruce in Canada
1975 - IRG/WP 348
Our work has been to develop a system which would have the stability of the ACA system and the formulation flexibility of the CCA system enabling properties such as fixation of arsenic, water repellency, appearance and cost to be controlled. Our permeability studies of spruce using a method previously developed indicated that an ammoniacal solution of copper arsenate is an excellent candidate for the treatment of spruce. Studies of the permeability of spruce sapwood microsections to CCA preservative and to an ammoniacal solution of copper arsenate proved that the ammoniacal system penetrates 1.7 to 1.8 times faster than the CCA system, in the radial direction. The permeability in the tangential direction was on the average 3.8 times better. These results were confirmed by pressure treatments of spruce lumber and spruce roundwood with both preservatives.
J Rak, M R Clarke


Manual of a mini treating plant for waterborne preservative treatment of timber and bamboo
1999 - IRG/WP 99-40130
This contributional article includes machinaries and equipments necessary for a small wood treating plant for the pressure treatment of tim bers with waterborne preservatives along with the cost and design. The preservative treatment limitations, treatment schedules and specifications for different products have been described. The cost of a mini treating plant will be 6,00,000 Tk. (13,000 US$), suitable for preserving timber and bamboo products for indoor and outdoor uses and will out last teak wood. The additional durability of timber and bamboo will create economically and environmentally safe conditions.
A K Lahiry


Problems caused by termites in buildings in the State of Sao Paulo
1976 - IRG/WP 150
Termites are the main insects attacking buildings in the State of Sao Paulo - Brazil. Their attack occurs in wood and wooden materials as well as paper, textile, leather and so on.
M S Cavalcante


The use of pressure cycling to improve heartwood penetration in Pinus radiata (D. Don)
1995 - IRG/WP 95-40050
This study investigates the effect of cycling pressure on the treatability of radiata pine heartwood. The results indicate that liquid penetration into the heartwood is affected by the preconditioning method used and pressure treatment time. There is no significant improvement in the penetration of Pinus radiata (D. Don) heartwood when a cycling or pulsation process is used.
P R S Cobham, P Vinden


Non-pressure treatability of plywood by CCA, CCB and boron
2005 - IRG/WP 05-40295
Study on diffusibility and absorbability of CCA, CCB and boric acid in 3 mm thick 3-ply hardwood plywood at water saturated and air-dry conditions and dipped at same concentration (5%) and same duration of time (12 hours) revealed complete diffusion of all the preservatives at water saturated condition. Only the CCA-C was found absorbed by the plywood at air-dry condition. The rate of absorption and diffusion of CCA-C was found about 4.5 times higher than CCB and boric acid.
A K Lahiry


An investigation of the effects of pre-steaming on the treatment of sawn spruce timber with Celcure A, a copper-chrome-arsenic preservative
1981 - IRG/WP 3150
Difficulties in the treatment of spruce using standard vacuum/pressure techniques with both water-borne and organic solvent preservatives are well known. We have evaluated the influence of steaming on treatability with a waterborne CCA preservative.
C R Coggins


Light organic solvent preservative treatment schedules for New Zealand-grown radiata pine
1986 - IRG/WP 3379
The influence of pressure differential and treatment time on preservative uptake and distribution in radiata pine heartwood and sapwood is investigated. Treatment schedules are defined which minimise solvent usage but ensure complete sapwood penetration and optimise heartwood penetration.
P Vinden


Effects of various preservative treatments on the mechanical and physical properties of plywood
1993 - IRG/WP 93-40007
The technical properties of plywood are related to both the intrinsic characteristics of its composing wood species and the quality and performance of the glue bond which acts as an interface between veneer sheets. Consequently mechanical and physical testing and glue bond strength analysis offer an appropriate means for studying the effect of preservative treatments on the overall quality of plywood. A range of boards was treated with waterborne and oilborne preservatives. Changes in modulus of elasticity, modulus of rupture and tensile strength were noted as well as variations in physical properties. Analysis of the glue bond strength was done by shear strength testing and determination of the amount of wood failure after different ageing procedures.
J Van Acker, M Stevens


Radical changes in the requirements for more safe pressure impregnation in the Nordic countries in 1988
1990 - IRG/WP 3581
After introduction of quality control schemes and standards in the Nordic countries during the seventies, the first radical change of the standards and practice of work took place after pressure from the labor unions and authorities in 1988 and 1989 in Denmark and in Sweden. A new class of preservation with less retention for out of ground contact use was introduced, fixation times were prolonged to 6 and 14 days, and branding became a requirement. At the same time, treating companies replaced CCA with arsenic-free preservatives, and started using processes for accelerated fixation. Drying of treated wood was started to be used widely.
B Moldrup


Recycling of pressure impregnated timber and preservatives - incineration techniques
2001 - IRG/WP 01-50166-19
The object of the recycling research projects is to determine the technical and economical requirements of the recycling of CCA-impregnated wood. In the first recycling of impregnated timber project the amount and location of recyclable treated wood in Finland was determined and the costs of recycling were calculated. An incineration test was also made (1998). The conclusion of the first project is that it is possible to design a full scale plant for burning CCA-treated wood, to treat condensate water, to purify the gases using a very effective method, and to treat the ash in a copper smelter. The object of the second recycling research project in Finland is to determine the technical and economical requirements of incinerating CCA-impregnated timber so that an investment decision can be taken on whether to build an incineration plant. Thus far in the course of the second project a trial has been established for collecting impregnated sawn timber at waste treatment plants and for cleaning the material of large metal constituents. The first part of the incineration trial was carried out in November 2000 and this will continue in the spring of 2001, after which an interested investor can reach a decision on a possible investment.
T Syrjänen, E Kangas


Creosoted radiata pine by non-pressure methods
1988 - IRG/WP 3486
Posts of Pinus radiata have been impregnated with creosote by immersion for 1, 3, and 7 days, and by hot-and-cold open tank with hot bath temperatures at 40°C and 60°C. On the basis of the retention rates obtained, suitable procedures are described for wood elements that are going to be in ground contact, and an analysis is made of the way in which the variables tested affect the results.
M V Baonza Merino, C De Arana Moncada


Long-term performance of a "wax" type additive for use with water-borne pressure preservative treatments
2000 - IRG/WP 00-40159
Field performance results are updated for matched CCA treated decking boards with and without an emulsion water repellent additive incorporated with the initial pressure treatment. Decks have been exposured for over 9 years in Harrisburg, NC. Boards were evaluated for in-service and laboratory performance for water repellent efficacy, as well as additive loadings in the boards after this exposure. All results support that these additives can provide long-term protection against many of the physical defects that develop in pressure treated wood during exposure.
A R Zahora


Report on the treated piles and fenders in the wharves in Port Moresby harbour, and the Huon Gulf, Lae
1977 - IRG/WP 433
To investigate the resistance of Papua New Guinea timber, vacuum pressure impregnated with Copper-Chrome-Arsenic salts, to marine borer attack in the waters of Papua New Guinea.
S M Rayner, C R Levy


Imprégnation de bois ronds par déplacement de sève à Madagascar
1975 - IRG/WP 352
M Fougerousse, P Guéneau


Patent on the use of tannic acid and ferric chloride against marine borers, etc
1982 - IRG/WP 495
R Mitchell, T D Sleeter


New developments in wood preservation
1974 - IRG/WP 335
Most of the developments in wood preservation in recent years have been stimulated by changing circumstances, particularly the increasing interest in reducing hazards and environmental, pollution but also the serious difficulties that are now being encountered in obtaining economic supplies of established preservatives. There is perhaps a danger that new controls to reduce pollution dangers may be too severe.
B A Richardson


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