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Mechanical and biological durability properties against soft-rot and subterranean termite in the field (grave-yard test) of beech wood impregnated with different derivatives of glycerol or polyglycerol and maleic anhydride followed by thermal modification in an opened or in a closed system
2021 - IRG/WP 21-40917
This paper presents mechanical and biological durability properties in soil beg test (soft-rot test) and field test (grave-yard test) against subterranean termite of the wood modified with an aqueous vinylic derivative of glycerol/polyglycerol or maleic anhydride cured in an opened or in a closed system. Wood modification was performed through impregnation of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) with aqueous solution of polyglycerol maleate, glycerol maleate, or maleic anhydride at 10 or 20% w/w concentration, followed with curing under oven heating (OHT) at 120°C, 150°C, or 220°C in opened system or under heat pressurised steam (HPS) at 150°C in closed system. The modified woods were then characterized for their weight percent gain and mass losses after curing process, mechanical properties [modulus of elasticity (MOE), modulus of rupture (MOR), work to maximum load in bending (WMLB)], and biological durability properties against soft-rotting micro fungi in soil beg test and against subterranean termite (grave-yard test) in a tropical country. Results have revealed that almost all modified wood presented higher MOE values than untreated wood, however, MOR and WMLB decreased up to 27% and 87%, respectively. Biological durability in the soil beg test against soft-rot indicated that almost all modified wood were specified as durable to very durable wood. However, among the treatments, the wood modified with polyglycerol maleate/glycerol maleate/maleic anhydride at 20% under OHT 150°C or the wood modified at lower additive concentration (10%) under OHT 220°C presented significantly better durability against subterranean termite within a period of 328 days in the field.
M Mubarok, H Militz, S Dumarcay, I W Darmawan, Y S Hadi, P Gerardin


Danish wood preservatives approval system with special focus on assessment of the environmental risks associated with industrial wood preservatives
2001 - IRG/WP 01-50166-01
The following is a description of the procedure used by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency to assess the environmental risks associated with preservatives used in the pressure impregnation of wood. The risk assessment covers issues considered to be of significance for the environment and which are adequately documented so as to allow an assessment. Such issues are persistence and mobility in soils, bioaccumulation and the impact on aquatic and terrestrial organisms. Unless required in special circumstances, the assessment does not apply to birds and mammals as the normal use of preservative treated wood is not expected to involve any noteworthy exposure of these groups. Approval of wood preservatives will be based on a general assessment of the environmental risk associated with the normal use of wood treated with the preservative in a realistic worst case situation. The assessment may address other aspects such as disposal and total life cycle.
J Larsen


Status of the research and development of a new preservative system (EFPL) for pressure treatment of spruce in Canada
1975 - IRG/WP 348
Our work has been to develop a system which would have the stability of the ACA system and the formulation flexibility of the CCA system enabling properties such as fixation of arsenic, water repellency, appearance and cost to be controlled. Our permeability studies of spruce using a method previously developed indicated that an ammoniacal solution of copper arsenate is an excellent candidate for the treatment of spruce. Studies of the permeability of spruce sapwood microsections to CCA preservative and to an ammoniacal solution of copper arsenate proved that the ammoniacal system penetrates 1.7 to 1.8 times faster than the CCA system, in the radial direction. The permeability in the tangential direction was on the average 3.8 times better. These results were confirmed by pressure treatments of spruce lumber and spruce roundwood with both preservatives.
J Rak, M R Clarke


Treatability of plywood containing intermountain Douglas fir veneers
1982 - IRG/WP 3203
Eighteen sheets of plywood were obtained which contained intermountain Douglas-fir veneers from two regions of British Columbia. Following pressure treatment with chromated copper arsenate (CCA type C) and ammoniacal copper arsenate (ACA) the preservative penetration and retention in individual veneers was assessed. It was concluded from the study that the intermountain Douglas-fir veneer could not be adequately penetrated by either CCA or ACA, although the degree of penetration achieved with ACA was better than that recorded for CCA. The preservative retentions measured were generally in excess of that required for plywood to be used in the preserved wood foundation system.
J N R Ruddick, A Walsh


A method of isolating actinomycetes from decayed wood
1974 - IRG/WP 126
This paper deals with a tentative method of isolating Actinomycetes from dacayed wood.
T Haraguchi


Système informatisé d'aide à la décision pour la gestion de la migration du pentachlorophénol dans l'environnement
1993 - IRG/WP 93-50001-10
This paper describes a Decision Support System (DSS), concerning pentachlorophenol (PCP) migration in the environment. The principal objectives of the DSS are to assist managers in siting of PCP-treated poles in the Hydro-Québec system and the storage areas and in the treatment of customer complaints. Four mathematical models are incuded in the system: a model simulating migration inside and on the surface of the pole, a model simulating migration in soil, a model simulating runoff and a model simulating migration in groundwater. Factors influencing the migration of PCP in the environment are discussed.
G Lefebvre, J-C Tessier


Safety technique in wood preservation
1974 - IRG/WP 54
S N Gorshin, I G Krapivina, B I Telryatnikova


CCA Chemistry
1983 - IRG/WP 3268
A Pizzi


Plastic-coated marine piling in Los Angeles Harbour
1984 - IRG/WP 4105
G Horeczko


Wood Protection in China
2009 - IRG/WP 09-30516
The wood protection has been recognised in ancient China, and has made the tremendous contribution to the knowledge and techniques of wood protection. The paper mainly introduced the development and situation of China wood protection industry, including industry organization, policy guidance, standardization system, quality supervision, training, technical exchange, project HYPERLINK "http://dj.iciba.com/extension/" \t "_blank" extension and so on. These works will rapidly promote the development of China wood protection industry.
Zhongwei Jin


An Historical Roof Timber System in the Old Town of Berlin-Spandau
2019 - IRG/WP 19-10949
In Europe the “Charter of Venice” was enacted on the 31st of May 1964. It is the international directive for the preservation of historic buildings and monuments. All countries in Europe now involve professional wood scientists and engineers in maintaining and preserving historical buildings. Here we discuss a restoration project involving 17th century roof timbering. This project may be used as a model for the restoration of other wooden historical monuments.
M Luke, W Unger, D Nellessen


Evaluating the Exterra Termite Interception and Baiting System in Australia
2003 - IRG/WP 03-20267
The Exterraä Termite Interception and Baiting System (Ensystex Inc., Fayetteville, NC) was evaluated in a field experiment near Townsville, Australia. Cellulose-acetate powder containing either 0.05% weight/weight (w/w) or 0.25% w/w chlorfluazuron (Requiemä) was tested for its efficacy in eradicating colonies of the mound-building subterranean termite Coptotermes acinaciformis (Froggatt). Thirteen mounds were used. There was no evidence of repellence, but there was little feeding on replenished bait. Five colonies were eradicated by 0.05% w/w chlorfluazuron and five colonies by 0.25% w/w chlorfluazuron: another colony was moribund and eradication appeared imminent. Colony decline was first suspected some 12 weeks after bait application. Colony eradication was confirmed, by destructive sampling, about five weeks later. Indicators used to monitor colony health were reliable. A suite of urban trials, demonstrating the effectiveness of Exterra Requiem Termite Bait in controlling a wide range of subterranean termite species throughout mainland Australia, is presented and discussed.
B C Peters, S Broadbent


Laboratory and field evaluation of Plasmite Reticulation System using bifenthrin as a chemical barrier within wall cavities against subterranean termites.
2005 - IRG/WP 05-20307
Laboratory and field bioassays undertaken to demonstrate Plasmite Reticulation system effectively delivers the termiticide (bifenthrin) within a simulated wall cavity at the required concentration. The chemical assay indicated that the amount of bifenthrin sampled at 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25m along the simulated reticulation system tested (30m) exceeded the manufacturer’s minimum recommendation of 0.0044%m/m. Results of the laboratory bioassay, using Coptotermes acinaciformis, indicated that the concentrations of bifenthrin present in the soil core samples at 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25m were extremely toxic and prevented termite penetration of bifenthrin treated soil in laboratory bioassays immediately after field soil treatment. No penetration of any soil core samples was observed in the field test against Coptotermes lacteus.
J R J French, B M Ahmed, J Thorpe, A Anderson


Less environmental impact of wood preservatives by considering the risk of attack in addition to the hazard class system
1995 - IRG/WP 95-50040-10
Hazard classes, which are standardized in Europe in EN 335, are most useful to direct chemical wood preservation towards the organisms which may attack wood in the various fields of utilisation. However, hazard only signifies the fact that an attack may occur without considering the actual risk to attack. To minimize the application of chemicals with respect of less environmental impact it is necessary to consider both, the hazard of attack and the risk which implies the probability, how often attack may occur and how important this will be. In addition, also the consequences of the failure of a wooden commodity will influence the need of chemical wood preservation. It is therefore proposed to combine the hazard classes as specified in EN 335 or in similar non European regulations with a risk assessment including time assessment as a basis for the requirement on chemical wood preservation. For this, details are given in the paper.
H Willeitner


Detection of Acoustic Emission (AE) generated by termite attack in a wooden house
1999 - IRG/WP 99-20166
Recently, considerable attention has been paid to methods for termite control, which involves few or no chemicals. To reduce the amount of termiticide needed, it is necessary to detect termite attack in wood as early as possible. The feasibility of acoustic emission (AE) monitoring for the nondestructive detection of termite attack has been discussed previously. In this study, we propose some technical solution for the application of AE monitoring to practical control operations. Using a needle-type waveguide combined with an AE sensor (PZT sensor), AEs generated and propagated within floors and walls could be detected effectively. A 0.04 mm-thick sample of the piezoelectric polymer PVDF, which was inserted between the construction members of wooden houses, could detect Aes propagated both in such members and at joint surfaces, although PVDF film is less sensitive than a PZT sensor. The feasibility of using a portable AE detector as the input device for a total security system against termite attack in a house is also discussed.
Y Fujii, Y Yanase, T Yoshimura, Y Imamura, S Okumura, M Kozaki


Colony elimination of Reticulitermes speratus (Kolbe) (Isoptera:Rhinotermitidae) by bait system
1997 - IRG/WP 97-10189
Following a two-year estimation of the foraging populations and territory of Reticulitermes speratus (Kolbe) by triple mark recapture program at Uji campus of Kyoto University, bait stations (commercialized products containing hexaflumuron) were set up in the foraging territory in October 1995 to eliminate the colony. Inspections demonstrated that the number of test stakes with foraging termites decreased after May 1996. No attack was finally observed in July 1996. As a later inspection in October 1996 reconfirmed no termite hits on any wooden stake in the foraging territory, the colony was considered to be eliminated by baits.
K Tsunoda, H Matsuoka, T Yoshimura, K Yamauchi


Assessment of dehydrogenase activity, fluoride content and total chromium content of soil profiles exposed to preservative treated wood within a model system
1993 - IRG/WP 93-10015
The development and prospective use of a closed model system to facilitate study of a number of indicators of environmental impact of wood preservatives laboratory conditions has been described (IRG/WP/2395-92). Chemical analysis of leachate samples collected from drained soil profiles containing creosoted pole sections remedially treated with a chromated fluoride preservative indicated small increases in fluoride and chromium concentrations. This paper details measurement of dehydrogenase activity and chemical analysis of soil samples recovered from the surface layers of the model soil profiles adjacent to treated pole sections. Reduced levels of dehydrogenase activity were associated with increased soil concentrations of leached preservative components and lower organic matter content. Findings are discussed as part of an assessment of environmental impact of the remedial treatment in the field
G M Smith, D C R Sinclair, A Bruce, H J Staines


Feasibility study for a dedicated pressure treated wood waste management system
2005 - IRG/WP 05-50224-22
For the creosote treated wood coming out of service, it has been estimated an amount of 200 000 t per year for the next twenty years, and 100 000 t per year afterwards. With a limited number of actors, mainly SNCF (as producer and as user), no importations, and available energy recovery options, it appears possible for setting a dedicated wood waste management system, if the SNCF agrees to. For the CCA treated wood, the amount of it coming out of service will increase and will be much more important, reaching about 400 000 t per year. For setting a voluntary dedicated waste management system might be much more difficult, because the importation is very important (about 50%), the margin of product low and the actors and users are numerous. Over the answer of the question on the feasibility for setting a dedicated pressure treated wood waste management system, this study must allow also define the priority actions to improve the pressure treated wood waste management.
C Cornillier, I Buda, E Heisel, G Labat


Initial results and observations of a model system to assess the efficacy and environmetal impact of preservative treated wood
1993 - IRG/WP 93-50001-02
The development of a closed model system for the laboratory assessment of the efficacy and environmental impact of a chromated fluoride remedial treatment for creosoted distribution poles has been described (IRG/WP/2395-92). The model consists of a precipitation apparatus above a treated pole section positioned in a soil profile from which leachate was collected via a series of simulated field drains. Chemical analyses of leachate and soil provided data indicating movement of toxic preservative constituents from the treated pole section to the model environment. These data were complemented by physical and chemical analysis of a sward of perennial ryegrass supported by the soil profile. This paper reports initial results and observations in terms of the models' suitability for assessment purposes. The advantages of the model system over traditional field studies are discussed.
D C R Sinclair, G M Smith, A Bruce, H J Staines


Final proposals for a field experiment to determine the performance of preservative treated hardwoods with particular reference to soft rot
1976 - IRG/WP 367
A series of hardwood stakes have been prepared and treated in the UK from samples (mainly sapwood) supplied from participants around the world. The stakes include 4 reference species common to each site and, in most cases, at least 2 local species of importance. The treated stakes will be despatched to the co-operating scientists and installed under local conditions. It is hoped that with periodic assessment it will be possible to build up a picture of the performance of a range of economically important species throughout the world.
D J Dickinson


Tanalith T - a new preservative system for protecting house frames in Australia from termite attack.
2003 - IRG/WP 03-30306
The sawn timber industry in Australia has expressed a desire for a new low cost termite treatment. The treatment needs to be on-line in the dry mill, minimising material handling costs and with a very fast processing time to meet timber flow through the dry mill. The preservative, Tanalith® T, forms an envelope on both Pinus radiata and Pinus elliotti sawn timber. Field trials conducted in Australia have confirmed this envelope will protect house framing timber from the most economically important termites in Australia. This paper reviews other research topics carried out during the development of Tanalith® T as a suitable preservative system for termite protection.
P R S Cobham, J Snow


Field test results for the elimination of subterranean termite (Coptotermes formosanus) colonies by a bait system containing the IGR hexaflumuron
1997 - IRG/WP 97-10222
Field studies were conducted at Chichijima (Ogasawara Islands, Tokyo) to determine the effectiveness of a termite bait system (commercial name: Sentricon* system) containing hexaflumuron (Insect Growth Regulator: IGR) in the elimination of subterranean termite (Coptotermes formosanus) colonies. The level of subterranean termite activity on Ogasawara Islands is high resulting in extensive damage to wooden houses. In this study, 2 houses were established as monitoring/test sites. At each house 6 to 17 Sentricon stations were installed and fitted with monitoring devices made of the sap wood of southern yellow pine. When termites were found in the stations, the wooden monitoring devices were replaced with bait tubes containing a bait matrix treated with the IGR. Bait tube replacement occurred in approximately a 2-week cycle. Following the third replacement of bait tube, termites' feeding stopped and the bait tubes were replaced with wooden monitoring devices. The stations were attacked again by termites from a new colony 4 months after the elimination of the original colony. All feeding activities ceased in an additional 5 months of baiting. This termite reappearance seemed to be due to the high level of termite activity in Ogasawara Islands.
K Suzuki, Y Morita, K Yamauchi


Hardwood field experiment: Progress report 1977-82
1982 - IRG/WP 3200
The international hardwood field experiment was planned in 1976 and set up in some 30 different sites around the world. The test stakes include 4 reference species common to each site and in most cases at least 2 species of local importance. It was hoped that a picture of performance of a range of economically important species would be built up and at the same time provide vital background information for people currently engaged in hardwood and soft-rot research. It is felt that these aspirations are more than being achieved and that as time proceeds this trial will prove invaluable in developing our knowledge of wood preservation on a world wide basis. Obviously it proved impossible to set up such a large trial simultaneously. Different sites also inspect their trials at different times and so the data presented is for different periods dependant on the site. For the reference species table 1 gives the latest data from each site and should be considered with report IRG/WP/3164 which gave information at earlier dates. Table 2 gives the performance of the other species for each site and, where stakes were available, for the master site (33) at Imperial college. No attempt has been made to analyse or comment on the results at this time. It is felt that this is a progress report for comment on by the sub-group. However, it is felt that together with the comments received these results should be duly considered for publication elsewhere.
D J Dickinson, J F Levy


IUFRO rating system compares favourably to weight loss for soil-bed testing
1990 - IRG/WP 2343
The soil-bed/small stake test is commonly used for rapidly evaluating the performance of new, more environmentally acceptable, preservatives. In a 1.5 year experiment with three copper-based waterborne preservatives, visual evaluation and probing using the IUFRO performance rating scale (0-4) gave very similar toxic thresholds to those derived from measurement of weight loss at the end of the experiment. Visual evaluation therefore appears to be a reliable indicator for comparing the performance of these copper-based waterborne preservatives. However, caution should be exercised in interpreting performance rating data as the stakes approach failure.
P I Morris


Lignin degradation by a non-enzymatic system supposed to be active in white rot fungi
2000 - IRG/WP 00-10340
Electron microscopic investigations have shown that ligninolytic enzymes of white-rot fungi are only able to penetrate the wood cell wall in late stages of degradation. Thus, the selective degradation of lignin of certain white-rot fungi can only be explained on the basis of a low molecular weight, highly diffusible system. A system, consisting of copper, a coordination compound and either H2O2 or organic peroxide was found to be highly ligninolytic and has been proven on different types of lignin model compounds. In this paper, it is shown that this system is also capable of delignifying soft and hardwood lignin. Delignification was indicated on wood sections by differential staining with astra-blue and safranine and was quantified by UV-microscopy in cell walls. It was demonstrated that especially when organic peroxide was used in the copper system, even the recalcitrant softwood lignin was depolymerized while with H2O2 only hardwood lignin was oxidized efficiently. Due to the selectivity of lignin degradation it is assumed that rather peroxyl, alkoxyl or carbon centered radicals than hydroxyl radicals are the active compounds. In principle the copper system is comparable to the diffusible system active in brown-rot, but with the latter one leading to cellulose degradation. A deeper insight into the mechanism of white-rot decay, including also the likelihood of non-enzymatic reactions could alter the generally accepted picture of purely enzymatic reactions and could probably offer a new approach to chemical wood preservation.
P Lamaipis, W Gindl, T Watanabe, K Messner


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