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Preliminary study of the fungicidal and structural variability in copper naphthenates and naphthenic acids
1996 - IRG/WP 96-30114
Copper naphthenates, an oil-borne wood preservative listed by the American Wood-Preservers' Association (AWPA), is manufactured by complexing copper(II) with naphthenic acids. Prior to AWPA listing as a wood preservative, field experiments showed that copper naphthenates generally had good stability and were active against wood-destroying organisms. Recently, however, there have been reports of some copper naphthenate-treated poles rapidly failing. One possible explanation for the varying effectiveness could be that the structure, and resulting biological activity, of the naphthenic acids used to make copper naphthenate may vary. To test this hypothesis several naphthenic acids and copper naphenates were obtained and their fungicidal activity against three wood-destroying fungi measured. In addition, the chemical structure of the naphthenic acids were examined by proton- and carbon- NMR. Different activities were observed, especially against a copper-tolerant fungus. Some apparent correlations were seen between the fungicidal activity and chemical structures for the few samples studied.
T Schultz, D D Nicholas, L L Ingram Jr, T H Fisher


A new concept of oxalic acid biosynthesis in physiology of copper-tolerant brown-rot fungi
2001 - IRG/WP 01-10394
Recently, a wide variety of roles of oxalic acid (oxalate) in wood decay systems have been receiving much attention. Copper tolerance of wood-rotting basidiomycetes has been believed to be due to the detoxification of copper wood preservatives by oxalate produced by these fungi. However, biochemical mechanism of oxalate biosynthesis in relation to physiology of wood-rotting fungi has not been elucidated although two oxalate-forming enzymes, oxaloacetase and glyoxylate dehydrogenase, have been studied in our laboratory. Recently, a new role of glyoxylate cycle in oxalate biosynthesis in wood- rotting fungi has been presented, and the cycle commonly occurred to varying extents among the fungi although they were grown on glucose. Enzymatic analyses showed that isocitrate was cleaved by isocitrate lyase in the glyoxylate cycle rather than oxidized by isocitrate dehydrogenase in tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and the fungi were found to lack a normal TCA cycle due to the absence of - ketoglutarate dehydrogenase. It is noteworthy that glucose was efficiently converted to oxalate in a theoretical yield of about 80%, accumulating in the culture media of F. palustris. The results further indicate that acetyl-CoA derived from glucose was not completely oxidized to CO2 in TCA cycle but was mainly converted to oxalate with help of the other coupling metabolic cycles, including glyoxylate cycle. Formation of oxalate from several intermediary metabolites using cell-free extracts of F. palustris confirmed that oxalate is also the final product of the metabolic pathway in the in vitro system. Thus, it is proposed as a new concept that most of copper-tolerant brown-rot fungi may acquire the energy by oxidizing glucose to oxalate, i.e. oxalate fermentation expressed in the following equation; Glucose + 5O2 --> 2 Oxalate + 2CO2 + 4H2O.
E Munir, T Hattori, M Shimada


Comparative performance of several ammoniacal copper preservative systems
1997 - IRG/WP 97-30151
The efficacy of several ammoniacal copper-based wood preservative systems was evaluated in this study. The selection of potential co-biocides was based on the results of an agar plate test. Following this, the most promising systems were evaluated in a standard field stake test. Good correlation was found between the agar plate and field stake test results. Of the preservative systems tested, copper/tribromophenol, copper/naphthenic acid, copper/DDAC, and copper/propiconizole were found to be superior against copper tolerant fungi in comparison to the other systems tested after three years of field ground-contact exposure. The performance of copper/benzoic acid was mediocre. Copper/citric acid was ineffective against copper-tolerant fungi, with its performance being no better than copper alone.
D D Nicholas, T Schultz


Efficacy of copper:propiconazole and copper:citrate systems in ground contact exposure at a site with copper tolerant fungi
2003 - IRG/WP 03-30305
Southern yellow pine (SYP) sapwood field stakes were treated with copper alone (ammoniacal copper carbonate, ACC) at four levels, or three levels of copper (1.6, 3.2, or 6.4 kgm-3, as CuO), air-dried, then re-treated with propiconazole in a light organic solvent at 0.07, 0.3, or 0.7 kgm-3 retentions. In a separate study, SYP field stakes were treated with three levels of ACC to give 6.7, 13.4 or 29 kgm-3 retentions, or the same ACC levels plus citric acid at 38% of the CuO level. These ground-contact stakes were installed at a test plot which has copper tolerant fungi, and inspected regularly for fungal and termite degradation. At the most recent inspection, the copper azole stakes had been exposed for 118 months and the copper citrate stakes for 100 months. For the copper azole stakes, copper alone was only effective at the highest copper retention (10 kgm-3, CuO basis). In contrast, the copper azole-treated stakes were adequately protected with 1.6 kgm-3 CuO and the highest (0.7 kgm-3) level of propiconazole, or 3.2 kgm-3 CuO and 0.3 or 0.7 kgm-3 propiconazole, or 6.4 kgm-3 CuO and 0.07 kgm-3 (or greater) propiconazole. For the copper citrate stakes, stakes treated with copper alone performed slightly better at all three retentions than the copper:citrate-treated stakes. We conclude that the co-addition of propiconazole provides increased protection against copper tolerant fungi and other wood-destroying organisms, with increased azole levels necessary as the copper retention is lowered. In contrast, the co-addition of citric acid did not increase the efficacy of copper.
D D Nicholas, T Schultz


A possible role of unique TCA cycles in wood-rotting basidiomycetes
2003 - IRG/WP 03-10461
The copper tolerant brown-rot fungus, Fomitopsis palustris, acquires metabolic energy by use of the constitutively-occurring Kornberg’s glyoxylate cycle coordinating with oxalate biosynthesis and glucose oxidation (Erman Munir et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, (2001) 98, 11126-11130). Furthermore, this fungus does not have the normal TCA cycle, lacking 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase which is a key ezyme of the TCA cycle of most living things. This paper reports that most wood decay fungi tested lack 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase (ODH) and that much greater activities of glutamate dehydrogenase compensating the absence of ODH were detected from both white- and brown-rot fungi.
E Munir, T Hattori, M Shimada


A Comprehensive Review of Copper as a Biocide, with a Focus on Micronized Copper
2008 - IRG/WP 08-30486
This paper reviews the wood preservative biocide active ingredient copper and delvers into new and previously unpublished data regarding the new micronized formulations which are now in vogue and widespread use in N. America in all residential treated lumber markets. Included in this review is the overall discussion of copper containing formulations used for pressure treated wood used over the last century, and the systems currently in use, worldwide today. Also included in this work, is a long needed thorough review of copper’s mode of action, environmental issues, discussion of copper tolerant fungi issues, leaching and permanence, and efficacy toward a wide array of both fungal and insect species.
M H Freeman, C R McIntyre


The Form of Copper: Does It Really Matter?
2009 - IRG/WP 09-30513
In recent years, several micronized copper formulations for lumber treatment have supplanted the solubilized copper formulations that in turn replaced CCA after its voluntary relabeling in 2004. The micronized or dispersed copper systems use finely ground but solid copper particles and deposit those particles within the wood framework. In contrast, copper in the soluble formulations is relatively mobile and available to react with various wood sites. However, this mobility can also lead to depletion from the wood. This paper explores whether or not the different “forms” of copper affect efficacy of the copper based systems.
C R McIntyre, M H Freeman, T F Shupe, Q Wu, D P Kamdem


Sensitivity to Copper of Basidiospores from Copper Tolerant Fungi: Fomitopsis palustris and Oligoporus placentus
2010 - IRG/WP 10-10707
Copper continues to be an important fungicide in wood preservation. It is the primary component of the preservatives that have replaced chromated copper arsenate for treated wood in residential construction in North America. However, a co-biocide is normally needed to protect against copper tolerant organisms. Previous work has shown that the spores of at least one copper tolerant fungus, Oligoporus placentus, were not very tolerant of copper. This explained the unexpectedly good performance of copper-only preservatives when just exposed to spores and not exposed to mycelium of such fungi. This work was designed to determine if the same was true of another copper-tolerant fungus that produces basidiospores in agar culture. An agar medium bio-assay was used to assess inhibition of basidiospore germination and mycelial growth of Fomitopsis palustris (Berk. et Curt) with O. placentus (Fr.) Gilb. & Ryvarden, as a known reference. The spores of F. palustris and O. placentus had the same copper sensitivity. The basidiospores were sensitive to copper concentrations between 20 and 50 times lower than their corresponding mycelium. These data confirm that spores of copper tolerant fungi are not very tolerant of copper.
C S Woo, P I Morris


Effectiveness of Copper Indicators in Treated Wood Exposed to Copper Tolerant Fungi
2014 - IRG/WP 14-20554
Wood treated with a copper based wood preservative will typically turn a green color. While the depth of copper penetration can be readily discerned from the green color of the copper it is standard practice in research and commercial treating plants to make use of a color reagent such as Chrome Azurol S, Rubeanic acid or PAN indicator to reveal the penetration more clearly. When copper treated wood is exposed to copper tolerant fungi discoloration of the original green color can occur. Reactivity of the treated wood with the color reagents can also be impaired. In this paper, the effectiveness of copper color indicators in detecting copper in wood attacked by copper tolerant brown rot fungi at early and late stages of decay was evaluated. Neither Chrome Azurol S nor PAN indicator could detect copper in the area where incipient and severe decay took place, even when chemical analysis showed significant levels of copper in these areas. Rubeanic acid was the only indicator which provided positive identification of copper in these samples. An FTIR study demonstrated that the loss of green color in copper treated wood by copper tolerant fungal attack is closely related to the formation of copper oxalate. The finding supports the theory that copper oxalate detoxifies copper and acts as a precursor for decay since a significant amount of copper oxalate was found in the area with discoloration but no visual decay, as well as in the area with severe decay. The results from this study suggest that the ineffectiveness of Chrome Azurol S and PAN indicators may be due to their inability to replace oxalate ion to form the colored complex with copper.
L Jin, K Brown, A Zahora, K Archer


Untreated and copper-treated wood soaked in sodium oxalate: Effects of decay by copper-tolerant and copper-sensitive fungi
2017 - IRG/WP 17-10888
Copper is widely used as the primary component in wood protectants because it demonstrates a broad range of biocidal properties. However, a key concern with using copper in wood preservative formulations is the possibility for brown-rot basidiomycetes to resist the toxic effect. Many brown-rot basidiomycetes have evolved mechanisms, like the production and accumulation of oxalate, which helps these fungi to tolerate copper-treated wood by detoxifying copper. The purpose of this study was to determine if untreated wood and copper-treated wood soaked in sodium oxalate influenced the rate of decay by brown-rot basidiomycete fungi. Both untreated and 1.2 % ammoniacal copper citrate-treated test blocks were subjected to an additional sodium oxalate treatment via two soaking methods (ten minute and two hour). Test blocks were exposed to two Fibroporia radiculosa isolates (FP-90848-T and L-9414-SP) and one isolate of Gloeophyllum trabeum isolate (MAD 617) and evaluated for weight loss at four and eight weeks. Decay was between 40-43% weight loss at week eight for F. radiculosa L-9414-SP when untreated blocks were soaked with sodium oxalate. F. radiculosa L-9414-SP demonstrated decay of 38% at week eight when copper citrate-treated blocks were soaked with sodium oxalate. F. radiculosa FP-90848-T decay was much lower for untreated blocks soaked with sodium oxalate (12-13%) and only slightly higher on copper-treated blocks soaked with sodium oxalate (19%) by week eight. G. trabeum MAD 617 decay was between 40-46% when untreated blocks were soaked with sodium oxalate. G. trabeum was unable to successfully decay the copper citrate-treated blocks soaked with sodium oxalate (0.5%) by week eight. The copper-tolerant and copper-intolerant test fungi used in this study demonstrated no major increase in decay when untreated and copper-treated wood was amended with oxalate.
K M Ohno, G T Kirker, A B Bishell, C A Clausen


Extracellular layers of wood decay fungi and copper tolerance
1983 - IRG/WP 1180
Extracellular layers around the hyphae of brown, white and soft rot fungi have been examined using electron microscopy. These layers were isolated for identification. Particular interest was directed towards the extracellular layers of copper-tolerant soft rot fungi.
D M Francis, L E Leightley


Evaluation of wood treated with copper-based preservatives for Cu loss during exposure to heat and copper-tolerant Bacillus licheniformis
1999 - IRG/WP 99-20155
Copper-based wood preservatives need to be effective against exposure to all types of microorganisms. Wood treated with six copper-based preservatives was exposed to 121°C and 20 psi pressure for 15 minutes under standard autoclave conditions and the copper-tolerant bacterium, Bacillus licheniformis CC01, for 10 d at 28°C and 150 rpm. Sixteen to 37 percent of the copper was released from the wood during autoclaving, with copper citrate demonstrating the highest percent loss. Forty-four to 82 percent of the copper remaining in the samples following autoclaving was removed during exposure to the bacterium in liquid culture; copper naphthenate in oil and ACQ-D had losses of eighty percent or greater of the remaining copper. The bacterium removed as much or more total copper in 4 of 6 gas-sterilized samples (85-94%) than the cumulative effects of steam-sterilization and the bacterium on treated samples. Copper loss from in-service treated wood compromises the efficacy of copper-based wood preservatives.
D M Crawford, C A Clausen


Proposed test procedure to determine the effect of timber substrate on the effectiveness of a copper/chrome/arsenic preservative in seawater
1975 - IRG/WP 411
R A Eaton


Proposed degradation pathway for quaternary ammonium compounds by mould fungi
1996 - IRG/WP 96-10166
One group of chemicals that has attracted considerable attention as potential wood preservatives are the quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs). Based upon results of previous research this study confirmed the degradation pathway employed in QAC-tolerant fungi. For this experiment the two dialkylammonium compounds didecyldimethylammonnium chloride and dioctyldimethylammonium chloride were used. QAC-treated wood blocks were inoculated with the tolerant fungi Gliocladium roseum and Verticillium bulbillosum. After incubation the remaining QACs were extracted with acidified acetonitrilic and HPLC was used to quantify and detect the degradation products.
J L Bürgel, J Dubois, J N R Ruddick


The use of chlorothalonil for protection against mold and sapstain fungi. Part 1: Laboratory evaluation
1989 - IRG/WP 3515
Laboratory screening of chlorothalonil alone and in combination with other fungicides was conducted against six mold and sapstain fungi. The most promising treatments appear to be chlorothalonil supplemented with CCA or copper-8-quinolinolate. Field tests have been implemented.
J A Micales, T L Highley, A L Richter


Fungal degradation of wood treated with metal-based preservatives. Part 2: Redox states of chromium
1996 - IRG/WP 96-10164
Concerns have arisen about the leaching of heavy metals from wood treated with metal-based preservatives, such as chromated copper arsenate (CCA). Of particular concern is the toxic redox state of chromium and arsenic in aging and decayed CCA-treated wood. Generally, hexavalent chromium is more toxic than trivalent chromium and trivalent arsenic is more toxic than pentavalent arsenic. The desired outcome from treating wood with CCA is total change of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and As(III) to As(V). As part of an on-going study to determine the fate of copper, chromium and arsenic during aging and decay of CCA-treated wood, we detected Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in situ in CCA-treated southern yellow pine lumber. The redox states of Cr were determined using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF). An SXRF microprobe was used to to detect Cr redox states by measuring X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES). The ratio of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) was determined (1) on the surface and interior of lumber two years after CCA treatment and (2) in lumber during decay by a CCA-tolerant fungus, Meruliporia incrassata TFFH-294. The XANES spectrum for Cr(VI) has a strong pre-edge feature that is not present in the spectrum for Cr(III). Only the Cr(III) XANES spectrum was detected on the surface and in the interior of the wood, indicating total reduction of Cr(VI). The XANES spectrum for Cr(III) was detected in wood after 12 week decay by Meruliporia incrassata TFFH-294, indicating that the fungus does not oxidize Cr(III) to Cr(VI) during the decay process. We are currently using XANES spectroscopy to detect and map in situ redox states of As in CCA-treated wood.
B Illman, S Bajt, T L Highley


Oxalic acid production of fifteen brown-rot fungi in copper citrate- treated southern yellow pine
2001 - IRG/WP 01-10388
Non-arsenical copper-based wood preservatives have grown in number since the 1980's as a response to environmental concerns posed by arsenicals. Interest in copper tolerant decay fungi has increased accordingly. Oxalic acid (OA) production by brown-rot fungi has been proposed as one mechanism of copper tolerance. Fifteen brown-rot fungi representing the genera Postia, Wolfiporia, Serpula, Gloeophyllum, Laetiporus, Coniophora, Antrodia, and Tyromyces were evaluated for OA production bi- weekly in southern yellow pine (SYP) blocks treated with 1.2% AI copper citrate (CC). Ten fungi were designated copper tolerant and produced 2 to 17 times more OA in the CC-treated blocks than in untreated SYP after 2 weeks. Weight losses ranged from 20 to 55% in CC-treated SYP after 10 wks. Five fungi were copper-sensitive, producing low levels of OA and low weight losses on CC-treated blocks. In this study, early induction of OA appears to closely correlate with copper tolerance. We conclude that brown-rot fungi able to exceed and maintain an OA concentration of >400 mM in this study effectively decayed SYP treated with copper citrate.
F Green III, C A Clausen


Fungi associated with groundline soft rot decay in copper/chrome/arsenic treated heartwood utility poles of Malaysian hardwoods
1992 - IRG/WP 92-1567
Copper-chrome-arsenic treated heartwood from Malaysian hardwood utility poles in service for 8-23 y at two localities in the wet tropical Peninsula Malaysia were surveyed for soft rot in the ground-contact region. Soft rot decay was detected in all the poles. Isolation studies indicated the ability of a variety of microfungi and basidiomycetes to colonize treated heartwood. Most isolates exhibited variable soft rot ability based on a combination of soft rot tests. A few of the isolates formed soft rot cavities (decay types 1 & 2) and belonged to genera previously found associated with soft rot decay. In particular, isolates of Chaetomium globosum and Phialophora occurred frequently on the surface of sampled poles, while Paecilomyces variotii occurred at all sampling depths from the wood surface. It appeared that soft rotting ability of selected isolates (determined from both mass loss and dilute alkali solubility of degraded native cellulose) was affected by the choice of incubation temperatures.
A H H Wong, R B Pearce, S C Watkinson


Copper-resistant fungi on pressure impregnated wood in Denmark
1994 - IRG/WP 94-10078
The occurence of Amorphotheca resinae Parbery and its asexual stage Cladosporium resinae (Lindau) de Vries on CCA and CCB treated wood has previously been shown. In the autumn 1993 some other blue stain fungi were found on CCP and CCB treated pine timber, such as Ophiostoma minus (Hedgc.) H. and P. Sydow, Ophiostoma pilifera (Fr.) H. and P. Sydow and Ophiostona piceae (Munch) H. and P. Sydow. The absense of arsenic from newly impregnated wood may create improved growth potential for species not previously found on pressure impregnated timber, such as the above-mentioned.
J Bech-Andersen, S A Elborne


CCA modifications and their effect on soft rot in hardwoods. Part 2
1983 - IRG/WP 3244
The work outlined in this document is a continuation of that presented in Document No: IRG/WP/3201. The findings described in the previous paper are summarised below: a double treatment of CCB followed by arsenic (CCB+A) is more effective than a double treatment of boron followed by CCA (B+CCA) or a single treatment of CCA, CCB or CCAB in controlling soft-rot due to Chaetomium globosum in birch. CCB+A is as effective as the other formulations in controlling Coniophora puteana and Coriolus versicolor in birch and scots pine. CCB fails to copper tolerant basidiomycetes such as Coniophora puteana (F.P.R.L. 11E). A further investigation into the relative activities of CCA and CCB+A was carried out in a soil-bed using loss in strength and loss in weight as the criteria of decay. At the same time some aspects of the chemical nature of the formulations were examined in an attempt to explain the different performances of the treatments in birch. Amongst these tests, gross chemical analysis of the treated woodblocks and observation of the progressive fixation of the preservatives were the most significant.
S M Gray, D J Dickinson


Susceptibility of CCB treated wood to fungal colonization
2003 - IRG/WP 03-10492
CCB treated wood is generally resistant to all wood decay fungi. However, like CCA impregnated wood, susceptibility of CCB treated wood to copper tolerant fungi have been observed. The ability of various brown rot fungal hyphae to penetrate and overgrow the wood samples was investigated. Samples made of Norway spruce (Picea abies) were impregnated with 5 % CCB solution according to the EN 113 procedure. After conditioning, part of the samples was leached according to the EN 84 method. Small stick of unimpregnated wood (r = 1.5 mm, l = 25 mm) was inserted into a hole, bored in the center of the samples, and after that sealed with epoxy coating. Sterilized, leached and non-leached impregnated and unimpregnated specimens were exposed to two copper-tolerant (Antrodia vaillantii, Leucogyrophana pinastri) and two copper sensitive (Poria monticola, Gloeophyllum trabeum) brown rot fungi for one, two or four weeks. After exposure, the inserted wood pieces were removed from the specimens and put onto nutrient medium in petri dishes. Growth of the hyphae from those wood pieces was then visually determined. Rate of colonization by the fungi were determined by measurement of CO2 production. After that, mass losses of parallel specimens were also determined. The fastest colonization of the unimpregnated specimens was by G. trabeum (one week). On the other hand, no fungal growth could be detected on non-leached CCB impregnated specimens even after four weeks of exposure. However, significantly more intense colonization by the copper tolerant fungi were detected on the leached CCB treated samples.
F Pohleven, U Andoljsek, P Karabegovic, C Tavzes, S A Amartey, M Humar


Determination of absorption, accumulation and transport of copper in mycelium of some wood decay fungi
1999 - IRG/WP 99-10323
Copper compounds are common wood preservatives. However, tolerance of some wood decay fungi to copper compounds has been observed recently. Therefore, we tried to elucidate possible causes of this phenomenon. We investigated uptake, accumulation and secretion of copper in the mycelium of potentially copper tolerant fungi (Antrodia sp.) and non tolerant fungus Trametes versicolor. We observed that potentially tolerant fungi have lower uptake of copper to the mycelium than non tolerant species. They also do not transport copper into the medium. That means that copper tolerance of fungi is probably based on low uptake of copper to the mycelium and not on the active transport from the mycelium to the medium.
F Pohleven, S Breznikar, P Kalan, M Petric


Degradation of lignin model compounds with coordinated copper in the presence of peroxide
1998 - IRG/WP 98-10282
A novel diffusible system capable of decomposing lignin model compounds with copper, coordinators and peroxides has been proposed. When pyridine was used as a copper coordinator, two synthetic dyes, Poly-R and RBBR were intensively decolorized with Cu(II) and H2O2 in aqueous solutions at room temperature. Although reactions with Cu(II) and H2O2 produce a strong oxidant, hydroxyl radical, via a Fenton pathway, the coordinated copper system presented here was much more effective than the simple Fenton reaction for decolorizing the polymeric dyes. In contrast to the dye decolorization, the Cu(II)/pyridine/H2O2 system was not effective for depolymerizing 14 C-labeled synthetic lignin. However, phenolic and nonphenolic lignins were extensively decomposed by Cu(II) and pyridine in the presence of lipid hydroperoxide model compounds in aqueous solution at room temperature. Since pyridine is produced by ligninolytic fungi and the pyridine nucleus is an essential component of fungal metabolites, we herein propose that the copper/coordination compound/peroxide could be involved in decomposition or modification of lignin during wood rotting.
K Koller, K Messner, T Watanabe


Lignin degradation by a non-enzymatic system supposed to be active in white rot fungi
2000 - IRG/WP 00-10340
Electron microscopic investigations have shown that ligninolytic enzymes of white-rot fungi are only able to penetrate the wood cell wall in late stages of degradation. Thus, the selective degradation of lignin of certain white-rot fungi can only be explained on the basis of a low molecular weight, highly diffusible system. A system, consisting of copper, a coordination compound and either H2O2 or organic peroxide was found to be highly ligninolytic and has been proven on different types of lignin model compounds. In this paper, it is shown that this system is also capable of delignifying soft and hardwood lignin. Delignification was indicated on wood sections by differential staining with astra-blue and safranine and was quantified by UV-microscopy in cell walls. It was demonstrated that especially when organic peroxide was used in the copper system, even the recalcitrant softwood lignin was depolymerized while with H2O2 only hardwood lignin was oxidized efficiently. Due to the selectivity of lignin degradation it is assumed that rather peroxyl, alkoxyl or carbon centered radicals than hydroxyl radicals are the active compounds. In principle the copper system is comparable to the diffusible system active in brown-rot, but with the latter one leading to cellulose degradation. A deeper insight into the mechanism of white-rot decay, including also the likelihood of non-enzymatic reactions could alter the generally accepted picture of purely enzymatic reactions and could probably offer a new approach to chemical wood preservation.
P Lamaipis, W Gindl, T Watanabe, K Messner


Tolerance of Wood Decay Fungi to Commercial Copper Based Wood Preservatives
2002 - IRG/WP 02-30291
Due to the use of copper based preservatives like CCB or CCA for more than a century, copper tolerant fungi have appeared in some European countries in recent times. It is therefore important to find out whether this phenomenon is specific for only classical copper ingredients, or generally for all copper based formulation. Thus, we tested the tolerance of three commercial copper based preservatives and copper(II) sulphate as well as potassium dichromate for comparison. In this research, seven copper tolerant Antrodia isolates and copper intolerant fungus Gloeophyllum trabeum were tested using a screening test and standard laboratory test SIST EN 113. Screening test were performed on potato dextrose agar (PDA) with copper concentration between 5.0×10-4 and 2.5×10-2 mol/l. The tolerance determined by the screening test was not always comparable with results obtained with the standard laboratory test. However, results obtained on wood samples showed that various fungal isolates exhibited different levels of copper tolerance depending on the copper based biocide. Tolerant strains were able to decay copper sulfate as well as copper naphthenate preserved wood samples. On the other hand, even the most tolerant fungi could not decompose wood preserved with classical CCB or copper amine preservative. It can therefore be concluded that various fungal isolates exhibited different copper tolerance regarding copper formulations. This finding is very important for remediation of waste treated wood by fungi. For a successful detoxification of waste wood impregnated with multi salt preservatives like CCA or CCB the suitable tolerant fungal strains have to be used, simultaneously for synergistic action.
F Pohleven, M Humar, S A Amartey, J Benedik


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