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Field performance of novel antisapstain formulations
1997 - IRG/WP 97-30125
The effectiveness as antisapstain formulations of combinations of oxine copper (Cu-8), carbendazim, hexaconazole, cyproconazole, flusilazole, didecyldimethyl ammonium chloride (DDAC), an alkanolamine borate (SB), benzalkonium chloride (BAC), 2-n-octylisothiazolin -3-one (isothiazoline) and p-chlorophenyl-3-iodopropagilformal (CPIPF) was determined for freshly sawn, block-stacked radiata pine in three 18-week field trials: 1. Established in summer 1992 evaluating combinations of hexaconazole, carbendazim and DDAC. 2. Established in autumn/winter 1994 evaluating combinations of hexaconazole, carbendazim, DDAC, BAC and SB. 3. Established in autumn/winter 1995 evaluating combinations of triazoles, DDAC, Cu-8, carbendazim, CPIPF, isothiazoline and SB. Reference standards included: Cu-8; Cu-8 + carbendazim; IPBC + DDAC and TCMTB. In all tests, formulations containing carbendazim + hexaconazole + DDAC gave better protection for 12 and 18 weeks than most other experimental formulations and were equal to or better than commercial standards.
D R Eden, R N Wakeling, C M Chittenden, J G Van der Waals


Laboratory and field trials of novel antisapstain formulations
1997 - IRG/WP 97-30146
This document covers the results of laboratory and field trials of combinations of fungicides formulated using a patented technology (PCT NZ 96/00143). A 3 week laboratory trial that uses radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) branch discs as a substrate was used to determine which combinations possessed a suitable spectrum of fungitoxicity against key sapstain, mould and decay fungi. In particular fungitoxicity against Ophiostoma piceae H & P Syd was looked for as this is the most difficult fungus to control on freshly cut radiata pine in New Zealand. The most promising formulations were then tested using block stacked radiata pine stored for 11 weeks during a high hazard summer period. In general the field trial results corroborated with the laboratory disc trial results. The importance of a broad spectrum of fungitoxicity and in particular a high level of activity against O. piceae, was shown by both types of trial. A formulation containing hexaconazole (0.014%w/v) plus carbendazim (0.028%w/v) plus a quaternary ammonium compound (0.291%w/v) was particularly promising. This formulation achieved significantly better (5% level of probability) control than the commercial standards, for 11 weeks of summer storage. The low fungicide concentrations used auger well for it's cost effectiveness. It is believed that this was in part due to fungicide synergy, broad spectrum activity and the use of microemulsions and solutions of the key fungicide components.
R N Wakeling, P N Maynard, D R Eden, C M Chittenden, B Carpenter


Surface retentions of PCP, TCMTB and MTC obtained during a field trial of antisapstain formulations
1993 - IRG/WP 93-20002
Formulations containing NaPCP or TCMTB and MTC were included as reference products in a recent field trial of antisapstain formulations in Queensland. Retentions of these actives on the surface of treated sawn Pinus elliottii were monitored by ultrasonic solvent extraction of excised samples and analytical determination by high performance liquid chromatography. Distribution of actives with depth and longitudinal position were monitored for the particular dipping/draining schedule employed, and related to dip concentration and time since dipping. The analytical data provide a direct measure of surface retention in terms of active ingredients per unit area, the assessment method preferred by WG II Sub-group 3 at IRG 23. Even if only applied to these reference treatments, such analysis would facilitate comparison between trials conducted using widely varying treatment regimes and conditions.
D E Ferlazzo, M D Needham, M J Kennedy


A study of the efficacy of antisapstain formulations containing triazole fungicides
1993 - IRG/WP 93-30021
This document gives efficacy data for antisapstain formulations based on triazole fungicides. A rapid (3 week) laboratory screening method was used to determine the efficacy of six triazole fugicides alone and in combination with other fungicides. Field trials were carried out of three promising formulation types, each comprising a triazole compound as the primary fungicide in combination with a secondary fungicide system. Of three triazoles tested in field trials hexaconazole gave significantly (5% probability level) better protection than flusilazole and cyproconazole for all three formulation types. The relatie performance of flusilazole and cyproconazole depended on the type of formulation. Type 3 formulations of hexaconazole (0.03% w/w) and flusilazole (0.05% w/w) and a Type 2 formulation of hexaconazole (0.05% w/w) gave exceptional protection to block-stacked radiata pine for thirty weeks with between 76 and 84% of boards having 5% or less of surface fungal degrade. The best commercial standards in field trials were Copper-8 hydroxyquinolinolate (Cu-8) (0.24% w/w) (Cutrol 375) and Cu-8 (0.15% w/w) plus carbendazim (0.15% w/w) (Hylite Extra) which at thirty weeks after treatment had a majority (> 80%) of boards with between 25 and 75% surface fungal degrade. These concentrations of Cu-8 and Cu-8 plus carbendazim are between 2 and 3 times what are normally used in New Zealand. At thirty weeks sodium pentachlorophenate (0.5% w/w) plus borax (1.5% w/w) had 40% of boards with between 26 and 50% degrade, 40% of boards with between 51 and 75% degrade and 20% of boards with between 76-100% degrade.
R N Wakeling, N P N Maynard, R D Narayan


Wood preservation in Poland
2004 - IRG/WP 04-30362
Dynamic growth of market demand for wooden elements and articles, generated in Poland increase of interest in industrial preservation. Today, Poland is a substantial producer and exporter of wood made products. Majority of exported wood - approximately 70% - is scotch pine (Pinus silvestris L.), which, due to its natural durability, requires preservation.
A Kundzewicz


Organic solvent preservatives. Essays on the ecotoxicology of new formulations
1991 - IRG/WP 3642
The knowledge on the ecotoxicological profile of wood preservatives become more and more important. The acute toxicity against aquatic organisms was examined for oil-borne preservatives, based on combinations of new fungicides (Tebuconazole, Propiconazole, Dichlofluanid) and insecticides (Permethrin, Cyfluthrin). These tests were conducted with fish, daphnia and algae. In principle the different formulations showed similar effects. The results of active ingredients and solvents confirmed the high sensitiveness of daphnia as test organisms. Criteria for hazards for the environment are presented and discussed.
H-W Wegen


Evaluation of new creosote formulations after extended exposures in fungal cellar tests and field plot tests
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30228
Although creosote, or coal tar creosote, has been the choice of preservative treatment for the railroad industry since the 1920s, exuding or "bleeding" on the surface of creosote-treated products has been one incentive for further enhancements in creosote production and utility (Crawford et al., 2000). To minimize this exuding problem, laboratories such as Koppers Industries Inc., USA, and Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Division of Chemical and Wood Technology, Melbourne, Australia, have developed changes in processing of coal tar that produce distillates with fewer contaminants. This "clean distillate" is then used to formulate "clean creosote" as a preservative. These new, unique creosote formulations are being investigated as part of a program to enhance the use of regionally important wood species in the United States. Four retention levels of each of two new creosote formulations creosote, one pigment-emulsified creosote (PEC) and one creosote formulation that meets the AWPA Standard C2-95 for P1/P13 creosote (AWPA, 1995a), were applied to two softwood species and two hardwood species. Two laboratory procedures, the soil-block and fungal cellar tests (accelerated field simulator), were used to evaluate the four creosote formulations. These procedures characterized the effectiveness of the wood preservatives. The soil-block tests were used to determine the minimum threshold level of the preservative necessary to inhibit decay by pure cultures of decay fungi. In general, the soil block tests showed there was little difference in the ability of the four creosote formulations to prevent decay at the three highest retention levels as summarized in a previous report by Crawford and DeGroot (1996). The soil-block tests will not be discussed in this report. Fungal cellar tests expose treated wood to mixtures of soil-borne fungi that promote accelerated attack. Crawford and DeGroot (1996) discussed the evaluation of the creosote formulations after 17 months of exposure in the USDA Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory (FPL), fungal cellar. At that point in time data from the fungal cellar tests showed that softwoods are protected better than hardwoods for all four formulations of creosote tested. This report will discuss exposure of the fungal cellar stakes upto 36 months. In addition, field stake tests are being used to verify service life of the new creosote formulations in vivo. Results from accelerated tests are indicative of field performance, but the correlation between laboratory and field results is still being investigated. Field stake tests are regarded as critical, long-term evaluations that provide results most directly related to the performance of treated products in service. In this study, we report on the performance of the creosote formulations after five years of exposure in field tests.
D M Crawford, P K Lebow, R C De Groot


Current techniques for screening initial formulations against Basidiomycetes and soft rot
1978 - IRG/WP 2103
J D Thornton, H Greaves


Progress towards controlling soft rot of treated hardwood poles in Australia
1977 - IRG/WP 289
H Greaves


New technique for inoculation of wood wafers with fungi
1997 - IRG/WP 97-20113
A pilot study is described for determining the best possible method for inoculating fungi onto the surface of wood wafers for sapstain control studies. Direct inoculation and spray inoculation are compared on water soaked and malt extract broth soaked wood wafers. The best growth of fungal hyphae across the surface of the wood wafers was achieved following spray inoculation onto malt extract broth soaked wood wafers.
J Snow, P Vinden


Chapter 6 - Preservatives of bamboo
2007 - IRG/WP 07-10635-06
Almost all currently available oil-borne, water-borne and compound types of preservatives suitable for the preservation of bamboo or wood have been described along with their classifications, applications, formulations, merits and demerits, history of invention or discovery and development. The preservatives suitable for wood are also considered suitable for bamboo.
A K Lahiry


In-ground performance of two formulations of chlorothalonil after five years of exposure at three test sites in Australia
1996 - IRG/WP 96-30101
Sapwood specimens of Pinus radiata D. Don and Eucalyptus regnans F. Muell. were each treated to three retentions of each of two preservative formulations (chlorothalonil in oil; chlorothalonil plus chlorpyrifos in oil) and installed in-ground at three field test sites in Australia. Specimens were treated with each formulation to achieve 3.2, 6.4 and 12.8 kg/m³ of chlorothalonil a.i. and 3.2 + 0.2, 6.4 + 0.4 and 12.8 + 0.8 kg/m³ of chlorothalonil plus chlorpyrifos a.i. For comparison, specimens of each timber species, treated to a commercial in-ground retention of a copper-chromium-arsenic (CCA) formulation, were also installed. Treated specimens (including controls) have been rated for their condition annually for attack by subterranean termites and fungal decay using a scale ranging from 4 (sound) down to 0 (failed). After five years of exposure, mean termite and decay scores for replicate test specimens at each site reveal that the performance of all three retentions of each formulation, particularly the two highest retentions, is comparable to CCA.
J W Creffield, T L Woods, N Chew


In search of alternative antisapstain chemicals for use in Papua New Guinea
1988 - IRG/WP 3472
The paper presents results of antisapstain field trials from three locations in Papua New Guinea as part of the Research Centre's programme to find suitable antisapstains to replace the hazardous sodium pentachlorophenate. Effectiveness of seven tested chemicals varied between indigenous pines (Araucaria cunninghamii, Araucaria husteinii) and white coloured hardwoods (Alstonia scholaris, Pterocymbium beccarii) but not between sites. The indigenous pines required lower chemical concentration for same level and period of protection than white coloured hardwoods like amberoi and white cheesewood. Period of protection ranged from four weeks to a maximum of 16 weeks depending on chemical concentration and species of timber. Potential chemicals recommended for use as antisapstain include Celbrite T, Busan 1009, Penacide and Woodguard E.S. and Woodguard E.C.
A Oteng-Amoako


Selective adsorption of antisapstain actives from two aqueous suspensions, and movement of actives into wood
1996 - IRG/WP 96-30103
Green-off-saw rough sawn Pinus elliottii (slash pine) boards were dipped in aqueous suspensions of two antisapstain formulations, NeXgenâ and Busanâ Sap Stain Preventative (Busan 1009), at three product concentration levels. Concentrations of active ingredients (NeXgen: CTL (chloro-thalonil) and MTC (methylene bisthiocyanate); Busan 1009: TCMTB (2(thiocyanomethylthio)-benzothiazole) and MTC) were monitored with respect to the amount of material dipped. Selective adsorption (removal of actives from the suspension at greater than simple volumetric transfer rates) varied with formulation and active ingredient, and increased with decreasing product concentration. Movement of active ingredients into dipped boards was monitored for 30 days after dipping. Mobility order was MTC >> TCMTB > CTL. Surface depletion characteristics were obtained for each active ingredient.
M J Kennedy, T L Woods


Relationship between stacking, location and antisapstain preservatives on visible degrade of Eucalyptus regnans and Pinus radiata boards
1999 - IRG/WP 99-20162
An antisapstain trial was established at a Eucalyptus hardwood sawmill in Victoria, Australia. The trial incorporated two commercial formulations of antisapstain preservatives, used at four different concentrations on both hardwood (Eucalyptus regnans F. Muell) and softwood (Pinus radiata D. Don) boards. The trial also utilised different stacking methods (block-stacked, sticker-stacked, and block-stacked and wrapped in black plastic) and included replicates placed both outside in the drying yard, and inside under cover from the elements. The variation in stacking methods and in location was used to provide a variation in the fungal hazard. Worst degrade (mean of 83% at 36 weeks) was obtained for the hardwood block-stacked outside and wrapped in black plastic. Lesser extents of degrade were obtained for sticker-stacked hardwood outside (4.3%) and sticker-stacked hardwood under cover (1.2%). Degrade of softwood was less than that of hardwood under all conditions. Statistical analysis of the trial indicated that the probability of any individual hardwood board deteriorating outside was nearly 4 times greater than for a board kept undercover. In addition, the probability of degrade of a hardwood board which was block-stacked and wrapped in black plastic was 3.4 times that of a hardwood board which was block-stacked but not wrapped, which in turn was 10 times that of a hardwood board which was sticker-stacked. The probability of degrade in untreated hardwood timber was 20 times that of degrade in preservative-treated hardwood timber, with variations in preservative concentration having an insignificant effect. Over all conditions the probability of hardwood timber deterioration was 5 times that of the softwood. The results of this trial confirmed that timber stored closely stacked and under poorly ventilated conditions suffered a higher visible degrade, as expected for sapstain fungi. However, although preservatives effectively reduced visible degrade under all storage conditions and at all concentrations tested, selection of correct storage conditions was also an important part of minimising degrade.
J Snow, P Vinden, S M Read


Effects of timber surface properties and dipping conditions on uptake of antisapstain actives from two aqueous suspensions, and ultimate effects on efficacy against mould and staining organisms
1995 - IRG/WP 95-30073
Green-off-saw rough sawn Pinus elliottii (slash pine) boards were dipped in aqueous suspensions of two antisapstain formulations, and the resultant surface retentions of active ingredients MTC (methylene bisthiocyanate), CTL (chlorothalonil) or TCMTB (2(thiocyanomethylthio)benzothiazole) were monitored by chemical analysis. Surface retentions increased with suspension concentration and surface roughness, and decreased with initial timber moisture content. Dipping time beyond 20 seconds, timber basic density and earlywood content had little effect. Relatively low surface retentions, produced by dipping smoother boards with higher initial moisture contents, provided lower protection against mould and stain during seasoning than higher retentions. Equations describing the effect of surface retention on efficacy were developed for both formulations, and retentions providing complete protection under the conditions of the test were determined.
M J Kennedy, T L Woods


The Role of Coformulants in Preventing Bacterial Biotransformation of IPBC
2002 - IRG/WP 02-10436
The inhibitory effects of disodium tetraborate decahydrate and benzalkonium chloride (BAC), two common coformulants of IPBC in antisapstain treatments, on an IPBC-transforming enterobacterial isolate ‘W1’ were determined by their effect on the specific growth rate constant in vitro. The IC50s of IPBC, BAC and borate were found to be 0.46, 0.026 and 5.7 mM respectively. The IC50 of the Arch antistain product AntibluTM Select was 0.024 mM, based on its BAC content. Although their IC50’s were significantly different, it was clear that the vast majority of the bacterial toxicity of the AntibluTM Select was due to its BAC content. The degradation of 0.4 mM IPBC by the bacterium W1, as measured by the accumulation of its degradation product, iodide, in liquid culture, was completely inhibited by BAC concentrations greater than 18 μM, and the toxicity of the spent culture medium to Aspergillus niger, as measured by an antibiotic assay disc assay, was not ameliorated above this concentration. Below 18 μM, the toxicity of the spent broth was significantly reduced, and the accumulation of iodide occurred rapidly. Demonstrating the toxicity of BAC to bacteria, and its consequent inhibition of IPBC degradation in vitro, are indicative of the importance of coformulation in controlling bacteria that might otherwise cause preservative loss, and of their significance in determining the ultimate environmental fate of cobiocides.
S R Cook, D J Dickinson


Copper based water-borne preservatives: The biological performance of wood treated with various formulations
1987 - IRG/WP 3451
Wood samples treated with the various components of CCA preservative singly and in combination were tested against a soft rot organism, a copper tolerant brown rot organism and in soil burial both unleached and after leaching. The results suggest that, of the elements tested, fixed copper is essential for preventing soft rot attack and fixed arsenic is essential for preventing attack by a copper tolerant brown rot organism in leaching environments.
S M Gray, D J Dickinson


Potential toxicants for controlling soft rot in preservative treated hardwoods. Part 4: Evaluation of combined diffusion and toxicity
1979 - IRG/WP 2129
A large number of inorganic and organic preservatives were evaluated as potential soft rot control chemicals, by their degree of inhibition of fungal growth after allowing them to diffuse through a 6 mm thick wood slab. The tests were inoculated with wood powder from soft-rotted CCA treated poles. Pentachlorophenol was unable to diffuse quickly through the wood slab, although formulations with hexylene glycol showed some promise. Hydroxyisoxazole gave good results as did a number of other organic materials including "Busan 30", "Busan 52", "Permapruf T", sodium oxinate, sodium trichlorophenate, "Gloquat C", „Hyamine 1622", butyl icinol, and the commercial bandage materials "Osmoplast" and "Wolman pole bandage". Of the inorganic materials tested, good results were obtained with "Basilit BFB", with other Cu-F-B formulations including "Blue 7", and with fluoroborate and fluorosilicate preparations in general. Arsenates also showed some promise.
E W B Da Costa, O Collett


Preliminary screening of diffusion formulations for the control of soft rot
1978 - IRG/WP 2104
We have an urgent need in Australia to develop in situ remedial treatments for the present population of in-service transmission poles. For various reasons we have opted for formulations which can be applied as bandage treatments and thus we are primarily concerned with assaying diffusable toxicants. Two basic approaches have been made: an assay of the formulation's toxicity; and a combination assay of the formulation's diffusibility and toxicity. Of the direct assay methods the filter-paper technique is the more rapid although with highly soluble formulations some leaching of toxicants will occur during the preparatory stages and probably during incubation also. Furthermore, filter papers are not strictly comparable to wood, and a modification we have considered is to use 'papers' prepared from mechanically beaten pulps rather than chemically degraded pulps. An additional modification would be to substitute veneers for filter papers, although this may give rise to surface concentration effects since the veneers could prove difficult to impregnate homogeneously. By far the most valuable technique for our own screening programme of potential toxicants to control soft rot in standing poles is the Petri dish/wood slab technique. While agar diffusion systems are rapid and provide valuable 'short list' data, the information obtained on diffusion rates cannot easily be applied to solid wood. Da Costa's slab technique is obviously advantageous in this respect. Furthermore, it can be so tailored that successive inocula can be sequentially assessed, thereby providing added information on component diffusion as well as total formulation movement. However, care must be taken in interpreting the data since it is not possible to distinguish directly which chemicals in a mult-component formulation have diffused first and hence which are the toxic ones. Similarly, it could be necessary to impose a time restriction on the test with certain types of formulations.
H Greaves


Generic code of good practices for wood protection facilities. Part 1: Wood protection (antisapstain) facilities
1993 - IRG/WP 93-50003
In general, the potential of high toxicity (aquatic and human) of wood protection (antisapstain) chemicals dictates the need to protect the environment and humans from its harmful effects. This document is a compendium of recommendations for the design and operating practices of wood protection facilities. The suggested recommendations focus on achieving the objectives of protecting the environment and workers in a wood protection facility from harmful exposure to wood protection chemicals.
G Das, V N P Mathur


Laboratory bioassay on the termiticidal efficacy of two ACQ formulations
1999 - IRG/WP 99-30199
The termiticidal efficacy of two ammoniacal copper quaternary ammonium formulations (ACQ) was evaluated in a laboratory bioassay using two species of subterranean termites, Mastotermes darwiniensis Froggatt and Coptotermes acinaciformis (Froggatt). Five retentions (1.0, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0 kg/m3 of active ingredient) of each ACQ formulation (MitrexACQ and ACQ97) were assessed in sapwood specimens of the softwood Pinus radiata D. Don and compared with the same retentions of the conventional benchmark preservative CCA (Tanalith C). All specimens (including controls) were subjected to an artificial weathering schedule prior to the bioassay. Under the conditions of the laboratory bioassay, both MitrexACQ and ACQ97 showed considerable potential as water-borne preservatives for preventing significant attack of P. radiata sapwood from two of Australia's most economically significant species of termite. At each of the retentions tested, MitrexACQ and ACQ97 performed comparably or better than equivalent retentions of CCA.
J W Creffield, A F Preston, N Chew


Long-term protection of stored lumber against mould, stain, and specifically decay: A comparative field test of fungicidal formulations
1984 - IRG/WP 3281
The problem of decay in packaged, unseasoned lumber stored for many months has become of major importance in recent years. Large financial claims have resulted from decay in Canadian lumber stored at length in seaports and storage yards of distributors. For decades acceptable protection from moulds and sapstain was readily achieved with chlorinated phenols applied at appropriate treating levels. However, in recent years, the use of chlorinated phenols in sawmills has become controversial, out of concern for its persistance in the environment and because of its broad spectrum of toxicity to practically all organisms. Although it was realized that this toxicity to humans had been over-emphasized, the discovery of traces of chlorinated dibenzodioxins as a minor impurity of some chlorinated phenols has generated further pressure to abandon the use of the latter. Forintek Canada Corp. has done extensive laboratory and field testing of fungicides for the lumber industry. Most of the field experiments were four-month studies (1) although one dealt with a two year evaluation of preservative retention and protection (2). In June 1981, under contract to Agriculture Canada, we began a field test of five new fungicidal formulations, comparing them with sodium tetra- and pentachlorpheates (NaTCP).
A J Cserjesi, A Byrne, E L Johnson


Effectiveness of a newly registered antisapstain preservative in preventing stain of Eucalypt timber in Australia
2000 - IRG/WP 00-30229
An antisapstain trial was conducted on two sites (Alexandra and Trentham) in order to establish the concentration of a newly registered antisapstain preservative (consisting of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) & 3-iodo-2-propynyl butyl carbamate (IPBC) & disodium octoborate (boron)) needed to prevent stain of Eucalypt timber. After 20 weeks of exposure at the Trentham site, the water treated boards had a mean fungal degrade of 98.8%. Those boards treated with the BAC & IPBC & boron at 1.5, 2.25 and 3.5% had a mean degrades of 31, 10.4 and 12% respectively. Boards treated with DDAC & IPBC 1% had a mean degrade of 18.8% at 20 weeks exposure. After 8 weeks exposure at the Alexandra site, the water treated boards had a mean fungal degrade of 75%. Those boards treated with the BAC & IPBC & boron at 2.25% had a mean degrade of 10.8%. BAC & IPBC & boron at all concentrations tested at both locations was effective in preventing the stain found on the control (water treated) boards after 8 and 20 weeks exposure.
J Snow, P R S Cobham, N Ryan


Laboratory evaluation of borate formulations as wood preservatves to control the subterranean termite coptotermes acinaciformis (isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) in Australia
2001 - IRG/WP 01-30266
The termiticidal efficacy of Borocol (sodium octaborate tetrahydrate), boric acid, bore-ester-7 and tri- methyl borate was evaluated in laboratory bioassays against Coptotermes acinaciformis (Froggatt). Seasoned sapwood blocks of Pinus radiata D. Don, and Eucalyptus regnans (F. Muell) were impregnated with the various borate compounds. There were marked differences in mass loss and mortality rate of the termite used in the bioassay units for different boron retentions. After 8 weeks the result suggested that, borate was toxic to termites in laboratory bioassay even at 0.20% m/m BAE and caused significant termite mortality. However, termites were not deterred from attacking the borate treated timber at higher retentions of > 2.0% m/m BAE. These laboratory results indicated that the minimum borate treatment required to protect timber against termites attack and damage was > 1.0% m/m BAE.
B M Ahmed, J R J French, P Vinden


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