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Colony elimination of Reticulitermes speratus (Kolbe) (Isoptera:Rhinotermitidae) by bait system
1997 - IRG/WP 97-10189
Following a two-year estimation of the foraging populations and territory of Reticulitermes speratus (Kolbe) by triple mark recapture program at Uji campus of Kyoto University, bait stations (commercialized products containing hexaflumuron) were set up in the foraging territory in October 1995 to eliminate the colony. Inspections demonstrated that the number of test stakes with foraging termites decreased after May 1996. No attack was finally observed in July 1996. As a later inspection in October 1996 reconfirmed no termite hits on any wooden stake in the foraging territory, the colony was considered to be eliminated by baits.
K Tsunoda, H Matsuoka, T Yoshimura, K Yamauchi


Physical barriers and bait toxicants: The Romeo and Juliet of future termite control
1991 - IRG/WP 1503
Soil chemical barriers are considered by some to be the most important technique for protecting buildings against subterranean termites in Australia (and elsewhere), providing a barrier against termite penetration. However, there is no such thing as a barrier that is 100 per cent +protective. And given the worldwide problems of using organochlorine termiticides, public awareness of chemical pollution and contamination to the environment, emphasis on physical barriers has been refocussed. In the event of such barriers being penetrated, the use of suitable bait systems and toxicants is considered a fruitful "back-up" strategy in future termite control measures. Such a system is environmentally friendly, has wide public acceptance, and readily marketable.
J R J French


Evidence supporting the use of termite baiting systems for long-term structural protection
2000 - IRG/WP 00-10377
The efficacy of the Sentricon Colony Elimination System containing Recruit II termite bait (0.5% hexaflumuron) in controlling active subterranean termite infestations has been demonstrated in numerous studies. This baiting system and other termite baiting systems are now widely used, and generally accepted, tools for remedial termite control in North America, Hawaii, and other parts of the world. The role of baiting systems in prevention of termite damages and long-term structural protection, however, is more controversial than their use in remedial control. We discuss three lines of evidence in support of the use of baits for long-term structural protection: (1) successful control of termite populations with baits in remedial studies allows a conceptual leap to preventative efficacy, since baits target colonies and populations and cannot be evaluated directly for prevention in the manner of soil insecticide barriers; (2) field and laboratory studies demonstrate that termite colonies feed on multiple resources and continue to radiate outward from each of those resources in search of additional food, increasing the likelihood of rapid bait discovery; and (3) results of our long-term field studies over the past decade demonstrate that newly invading termites will reuse existing galleries in the soil left by earlier colonies that lead to monitoring stations, were detected in monitoring stations, and were subsequently eliminated without any noticeable evidence of structural infestation or damage.
J K Grace, N-Y Su


Trials on the field control of the Formosan subterranean termite with Amdro® bait
1982 - IRG/WP 1163
Amdro® - treated paper towels were introduced into two field colonies of the Formosan subterranean termite in Hawaii. At the concentration of 180 ppm, the toxicant bait was ineffective one month after the introduction. At higher concentrations (> 6,400 ppm), the baits were eaten initially; however, one week after introduction, termites avoided or covered the baits. The 15,000 ppm baits supressed the activity of one colony but did not affect the other.
N-Y Su, M Tamashiro, J R Yates III


A method for screening termite baits using Coptotermes lacteus mounds
1984 - IRG/WP 1237
A method with several variations designed to rapidly screen potential bait substrates using Coptotermes lacteus mounds is described. The equipment used in this method is relatively inexpensive, readily prepared in the laboratory, and easily installed into active mounds in the field. Bait substrates are in continuous contact with a 'high termite hazard', and may be monitored with minimum interference to the termites.
J R J French, P J Robinson


Controlling Coptotermes (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) infestations in buildings with bait boxes
2000 - IRG/WP 00-10372
This paper describes the results of a commercial pest control operators use of the CSIRO bait box procedure in controlling infestations within buildings of subterranean termites ('termites') of the genus Coptotermes. Polystyrene bait boxes (480 x 330 x 210 mm3) were filled with alternate layers of corrugated cardboard and kiln-dried hardwood strips of Eucalyptus regnans F. Meull. (mountain ash). A viewing port at one end of each box allowed for the operator, or the clients, to check the presence of termites in the bait box. On discovering termite activity in the box, a dust toxicant (arsenic trioxide) was applied to the aggregated individuals, and the dusted termites returned to the box, thus spreading the toxin to other members of the nest colony, leading to it's collapse. On average, the time from installation to aggregating termites was about 4-6 weeks. Of the seventy-four boxes installed since 1994, sixty-six boxes were placed inside buildings, while eight boxes were positioned around buildings. Most were placed within buildings in the sub-floor areas, and alongside termite-infested skirting boards and architraves within slab-on-ground constructions. Other boxes were placed in cupboards, on top of termite-infested flooring, roof areas and on floors in garages. Eighty-five percent of the boxes lured termites, while 13% failed to lure any termites. Of those boxes with termites, there was a 82% success rate using arsenic trioxide as the dust toxicant. Eradication of termite colonies was recorded when no further termite activity was found after 6-12 months. These results are discussed in relation to present and future termite control.
J R J French, T Boschma


Laboratory evaluation of chemicals as termiticides
1986 - IRG/WP 1293
Laboratory procedures are described for screening chemicals against subterranean termites. Fast-acting compounds with persistent termiticidal activity are identified in tests using a soil substrate, and slower-acting bait toxicants are evaluated in a series of tests using cellulose substrates.
S C Jones


Evaluating the Exterra Termite Interception and Baiting System in Australia
2003 - IRG/WP 03-20267
The Exterraä Termite Interception and Baiting System (Ensystex Inc., Fayetteville, NC) was evaluated in a field experiment near Townsville, Australia. Cellulose-acetate powder containing either 0.05% weight/weight (w/w) or 0.25% w/w chlorfluazuron (Requiemä) was tested for its efficacy in eradicating colonies of the mound-building subterranean termite Coptotermes acinaciformis (Froggatt). Thirteen mounds were used. There was no evidence of repellence, but there was little feeding on replenished bait. Five colonies were eradicated by 0.05% w/w chlorfluazuron and five colonies by 0.25% w/w chlorfluazuron: another colony was moribund and eradication appeared imminent. Colony decline was first suspected some 12 weeks after bait application. Colony eradication was confirmed, by destructive sampling, about five weeks later. Indicators used to monitor colony health were reliable. A suite of urban trials, demonstrating the effectiveness of Exterra Requiem Termite Bait in controlling a wide range of subterranean termite species throughout mainland Australia, is presented and discussed.
B C Peters, S Broadbent


Justification for use of mirex in termite control
1988 - IRG/WP 1346
In August 1987, organochlorines were withdrawn in North America from use in termite control. This has left the industry and the community with reduced options in long term protection of wood and wood products. A case is presented to justify the use of the slow-acting stomach termiticide, mirex, under special permit, for use only in the bait-block method of termite control. This method, while not acting like the organochlorines as a chemical barrier around newly constructed and existing buildings will, however, offer an alternative control measure in eradicating subterranean termites when buildings become infested by these insects. Health and safety aspects are discussed.
J R J French


Effects of methoprene on Coptotermes formosanus (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae)
1987 - IRG/WP 1322
Methoprene affected differentiation and survival of Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki in laboratory studies. At 5, 9, 13, and 17 weeks, superfluous intercastes and presoldiers were produced when termites were allowed to feed on concentrations of 1,000 and 2,000 ppm methoprene in wood blocks. Colony numbers were significantly reduced after 13 and 17 weeks of exposure to the insect growth regulator. Termites are significantly less of the treated blocks than of the controls and sometimes physically sealed off the treated blocks, which suggests that some concentrations of methoprene may have slight antifeedant properties. Colonies varied in their responses to this chemical.
S C Jones


A method to evaluate the effeetiveness of bait application using a transferred nest of Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae)
1999 - IRG/WP 99-20161
Although a survey of monitoring stations can tell us the decline of termite activity after application of baits, it seems questionable to conclude an eradication of a Whole colony of subterranean termites if the termites move out their foraging territory. Only reliable method to ensure the success of bait application is to determine the absence of living termites in their nest in accordance with a survey of monitoring stations. A nest of Coptotermes formosanus was first collected from the field and buried back into the soil with some wooden blocks in a test site. Monitoring stations were installed around the nest to examine termite activity. After termites settled down well, mark-release-recapture was applied to estimate foraging population and then bait application was initiated. When foraging activity ceased, the nest was dug out to find any live termites present. This technique allowed us to draw out a conclusion that baiting eliminated a whole colony of C. formosanus.
K Tsunoda, T Yoshimura, H Matsuoka, Y Hikawa


Susceptibility of softwood bait stakes to attack by subterranean termites (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae)
1994 - IRG/WP 94-20037
Sapwood stakes of Australian-grown Araucaria cunninghamii (hoop pine), Pinus elliotii (slash pine), Pinus radiata (radiata pine) and North American-grown Pinus sp. (southern yellow pine) were exposed to subterranean termite attack in an in-ground bioassay. Stakes in bait containers and bare stakes were attacked by Coptotermes acinaciformis and Schedorhinotermes intermedius. Basic susceptibility of these timbers was evaluated with regard to potential as termite monitoring devices. Variation between timbers and variation between termite species are described. The relevence of these data to suppressing foraging populations of subterranean termites, in Australia, using insect growth regulators, is discussed.
B C Peters, R T Murray, C J Fitzgerald


Preference of the Formosan subterranean termite for wood previously damaged by conspecifics
1988 - IRG/WP 1338
In a laboratory choice test, groups of termites from five colonies of Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki were presented with wood blocks which had sustained previous termite damage: 1) by nestmates, 2) by conspecifics from another colony, 3) by another termite species, Reticulitermes virginicus Banks, and 4) no damage. Coptotermes formosanus preferred wood previously damaged by conspecifics over that damaged by Reticulitermes virginicus. Woodfeeding rate was slightly, though not significantly, higher for conspecific treatments than for controls.
J P La Fage, K S Delaplane


Field test results for the elimination of subterranean termite (Coptotermes formosanus) colonies by a bait system containing the IGR hexaflumuron
1997 - IRG/WP 97-10222
Field studies were conducted at Chichijima (Ogasawara Islands, Tokyo) to determine the effectiveness of a termite bait system (commercial name: Sentricon* system) containing hexaflumuron (Insect Growth Regulator: IGR) in the elimination of subterranean termite (Coptotermes formosanus) colonies. The level of subterranean termite activity on Ogasawara Islands is high resulting in extensive damage to wooden houses. In this study, 2 houses were established as monitoring/test sites. At each house 6 to 17 Sentricon stations were installed and fitted with monitoring devices made of the sap wood of southern yellow pine. When termites were found in the stations, the wooden monitoring devices were replaced with bait tubes containing a bait matrix treated with the IGR. Bait tube replacement occurred in approximately a 2-week cycle. Following the third replacement of bait tube, termites' feeding stopped and the bait tubes were replaced with wooden monitoring devices. The stations were attacked again by termites from a new colony 4 months after the elimination of the original colony. All feeding activities ceased in an additional 5 months of baiting. This termite reappearance seemed to be due to the high level of termite activity in Ogasawara Islands.
K Suzuki, Y Morita, K Yamauchi


Bait box technique for remedial subterranean termite contro
1995 - IRG/WP 95-10115
The bait box technique, as described in this paper, was first used as a method to apply the dust toxicant, arsenic trioxide, to large numbers of aggregated subterranean termites. Over the last twelve years or so the technique has been refined, and in recent years, gained acceptance as an alternative subterranean termite control measure by members of the Australian pest control industry. This baiting technique is particularly timely in Australia, given that the organochlorine insecticides are to be banned in termite control strategies in all states as from June 1995, except for a period of extension in the Northern Territory. Details of box construction, placement, and application of the dust toxicant are outlined. Suggestions are offered in the use of this technique with other dust toxicants, such as inclusion compounds and microbial spores pathogenic to termites, and bait toxicants.
J R J French, B M Ahmed, D M Ewart


Detection of Termite Attack to Wood Stakes in a Monitoring Station Using Ceramic Gas Sensors and Acoustic Emission (AE) Sensor
2003 - IRG/WP 03-20271
To evaluate the termite activity in monitoring stations non-destructively, metabolic gas from termites and acoustic emission generated by feeding of termites were measured. Ten cylindrical stations with small wood stakes of Japanese red pine (Pinus densiflora) were buried around a house attacked by Coptotermes formosanus SHIRAKI. A sample air in the station was collected by sucking through a drilled hole of the station lid and analyzed using two types of ceramic gas sensors (odour- and hydrogen-selective sensors). Acoustic emissions (AEs) were detected by a PZT sensor attached to the cross section of one of the small stakes in the station. The concentrations of two components of the collected gas, odour and hydrogen, and AE event rate per 2 minutes were measured periodically from December 2001 to February 2003. The infestation activity in the station was also evaluated by visual inspection. In the early stage of the experiment, from the first to the third measurements, neither AEs nor significant level of the gas concentration was detected, and no termite was found in any stations. A higher gas concentration of odour and hydrogen and a larger number of AE events were detected since termites have invaded in the stations. These findings suggest that termite attack in the monitoring station can be evaluated by using two types of the gas sensors and AE sensor.
Y Yanase, Y Fujii, S Okumura, T Yoshimura, Y Imamura, T Maekawa, K Suzuki


Estimation of oral toxicity of boron as a bait toxicant and the trophallactic effects between individual members of termite colonies.
2003 - IRG/WP 03-10495
In recent years, because of the favourable environmental characteristics of boron, researchers in the wood preservation industries have refocussed on the use of boron as a major wood preservative against wood-destroying insects. Currently the greatest use of boron compounds is in remedial treatments. Boron has been found to have slow-acting toxicity against subterranean termites. Because of this characteristic, boron compounds may also be used as termite bait toxicants. The effect of boric acid on an individual donor termite was investigated in laboratory bioassays Trophallactic transfer of boron by these individual termites to other orphaned group of termite workers was conducted and the effects on the recipient groups recorded. It was believed that, this sequence of tests would provide a greater understanding of the carrying ability of ‘bait toxicant’ by individual termites, and allow estimates of the threshold toxicity of boric acid and termite survival rates to be determined. The bait matrix was Eucalyptus regnans F. Muell sawdust impregnated with various formulations of boric acid solutions in the laboratory. The result suggests that the toxicity of boron is dose dependent and it critical for the termites to ingest sufficient amounts of boron. But the mode of toxicity of boron has not yet been fully explained.
B M Ahmed


Acceleration of boric acid uptake into the subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki using steamed larch wood
2000 - IRG/WP 00-10353
Laboratory tests were done to measure the efficacy of addition of steamed larch (Larix leptolepis (Sieb. et Zucc.) Gord.) heartwood extracts for the uptake of boric acid against the termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki. Paper discs were treated with the water-soluble fraction obtained from hot-water extracts of steamed larch wood (S-Water) with or without 0.01-2.0% boric acid, followed by exposure to this of termites, C. formosanus. The consumptions of the discs, termite mortalities, and boron contents in the termite bodies were measured. The S-Water significantly accelerated the consumptions of the discs at the retentions of boric acid below 0.1% (w/w) (p<0.01). However, regardless of the addition of the S-Water, the termite mortalities were almost the same at all the retentions of boric acid examined after 21 days of exposure. When the paper discs treated with the S-Water and 2.0% boric acid were given to workers and soldiers, boron contents in workers were lower than those of the same experiment without soldiers (p<0.01). This is because ingested boron was incorporated into soldier bodies from workers by trophallaxis. In the experiment using only workers, boron contents of termites fed with 2.0% boric acid plus the S-Water were larger than those of the termites fed without the S-Water. From the result, it was supposed that the S-Water inhibited the excretion of boron from the termite bodies or increased the accumulation of it in the termite bodies.
W Ohmura, S Doi, S Ohara


Practical applications of steamed larch wood to a termite bait system using chlorfluazuron
2003 - IRG/WP 03-10464
Less chemical strategies are required for decrease of damages to residents from chemicals such as organic phosphates and carbamates those are usually used to prevent termite attacks on wooden buildings. One of the strategies is a bait system that has already been employed in the termite-infested areas. We tried to use steamed larch wood as a monitor wood and a bait matrix to stimulate feeding actions of Coptotermes formosanus and Reticulitermes speratus on a termite bait system using chlorfluazuron. The results of about 140 field trials indicated that steamed larch wood is a specifically effective wood-feeder for both the termite species.
S Doi, S Shibutani, K Hanada, T Miyahara


Sulfluramid, a new bait concept for the control of termites
1995 - IRG/WP 95-30075
The annual cost of preventing, controlling and repairing the damage done by termites in the United States of America is in the billions of dollars. Current termite control methodology is generally effective in the control of termite activity. However, new technology (termite foams, termite baits, physical barriers) is emerging which has or will provide new tools to control termites. This report centers on the use of a termite bait to control termite populations both in the laboratory and in the field. The bait toxicant used was sulfluramid, a slow acting stomach poison. Laboratory tests indicated that the termite bait provided 100% control of the laboratory colonies (1,000 and 10,000 termites per colony). Field results indicated that the baits provided 100% control of termite active areas.
J B Ballard, T K Porter


Field tests of molybdenum and tungsten baits for termite control
2004 - IRG/WP 04-30345
Molybdenum and tungsten compounds are slow acting to termites and show a high termiticidal efficacy. In our previous papers, we have already reported that those are useful as termiticidal ingredients of bait formulations. The demand for natural rubber is still on the increase. However some kinds of termites inhabiting rubber plantations damage rubber trees and pose a serious threat. To cope with this problem, we prepared bait stakes by having rubber tree chips impregnated with barium salts of molybdenum and tungsten compounds and then solidifying the mixture with phenolic-type adhesive. In field tests conducted at a rubber plantation in Thailand, the bait stakes were hit into the ground around each termite mound and the level of termite activities were observed at intervals. After one and a half years from the start of the test, it was confirmed that our bait formulations eventually eradicated termite colonies of Macrotermes and Odontotermes.
Y Katsuda, K Nakayama, C Vongkaluang


Comparison of various types of bait containers designed to aggregate large numbers of foraging subterranean termites from natural populations in below-ground mound colonies
1995 - IRG/WP 95-10116
At Walpeup in the semi-arid mallee country of north-west Victoria (350 km from Melbourne), there are several indigenous subterranean termite species, none of which build above-ground mound colonies but build their colonies below-ground and/or in trees. This paper describes a baiting experiment in which three types of bait containers were compared in their ability to aggregate large numbers of foraging subterranean termites of the Coptotermes species. These species were targeted as they are considered the most economically important termite "pests" of wood and wood products in Australia. The area was pre-baited with radiata pine timbers that were buried just below the surface of the soil and located around trees and vegetation that were infested with Coptotermes species. After foraging termites had located and attacked the pre-baits, the various types of bait containers were installed on top of the infested pre-bait material. Bait containers were removed after five weeks and each was replaced by fresh bait containers. This occurred three times. All bait containers were transported to our laboratory in Melbourne and the mass of aggregated termites in each container weighed and wood consumption estimated. Bait containers that were half buried in the ground and covered with large plastic sheets and soil proved the most "attractive" of the various containers used in this field experiment. Also, the wood consumption rates of the two Coptotermes species collected from the field were compared in laboratory bioassays.
J R J French, B M Ahmed


Laboratory evaluation of JB-TB003 as potential bait toxicant against the subterranean termite, Coptotermes acinaciformis in Australia. subterranean termite, Coptotermes acinaciformis in Australia
1997 - IRG/WP 97-10214
In this laboratory evaluation, Coptotermes acinaciformis actively attacked in the first week of testing Pinus radiata wood blocks (50 x 25 x 15 mm3) treated with concentrations of JB-TB003 (i.e. 25, 50, 100, 200 and 400 ppm); the blocks with highest concentration were the most attractive. Results were similar whether blocks were leached or unleached. The earliest mortality occurred in the 400 ppm treatments between the fifth and sixth week of testing. All levels of JB-TB003 treatments proved toxic to C. acinaciformis, within 8 weeks. Termite mortality over the test period in the water treated and solvent treated controls was 10 per cent. JB-TB003 stimulated active termite feeding and tended to override the termites&apos; tendency to &apos;mud-up&apos; their food source and surroundings. This suggests a strong &apos;attractancy - feeding-response&apos; induced by JB-TB003. Since there was no significant difference between toxicity levels in the leached and unleached blocks it may be concluded that JB-TB003 was firmly bound to the wood substrate of the timber specimens. These laboratory results strongly indicate that JB-TB003 has a role as a potential termite bait toxicant, particularly against Coptotermes species. Field trials are currently in progress.
B M Ahmed, J R J French, A R Valcke, P Blunt


Feeding stimulants to enhance bait acceptance by Formosan termites
1994 - IRG/WP 94-10055
Four nitrogenous compounds were found to increase feeding by Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki in the laboratory. Cardboard disks dipped in urea solutions were consumed significantly more than untreated cardboard disks. Cardboard dipped in 8% urea showed a significant change in weight due to termite feeding over other urea treated cardboards. Examination of 15 amino acids in no choice feeding tests indicated that three, L-lysine, L-proline, and L-isoleucine, were feeding stimulants to Coptotermes formosanus. A fast screening method for feeding stimulant detectian was developed and is discussed. Using this method on 18 amino acids showed that L-proline and L-lysine were the best feeding stimulants.
G Henderson, M Kirby, J Chen


Field evaluation of several bait toxicants for subterranean termite control: A preliminary report
1988 - IRG/WP 1376
Since 1983, field studies have been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of several bait toxicants in reducing subterranean termite populations at the Chipola Experimental Forest in Florida. Tests with fenoxycarb (Ro 13-5223), Ro 16-1295, and Avermectin B1 indicated that fenoxycarb showed the most promise. Large numbers of presoldiers and intercastes have continued to occur in plots treated with the insect growth regulator fenoxycarb, and termite numbers and damage to wooden stakes have been significantly reduced when compared to control plots.
S C Jones


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