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Working Group I Sub-group 5 'Insects in dry wood'. Plan for data sheets
1982 - IRG/WP 1173
S Cymorek


Insects in dry wood (other than termites)
1977 - IRG/WP 153
S Cymorek


Working Group I 'Biological Problems' Sub-group 'Insects in dry wood (other than termites)', Scope of work
1976 - IRG/WP 152
S Cymorek


On the problem "House Longhorn Beetle" in hardwoods and an aid to distinguish between Hylotrypes bajulus and Hesperophanes cinereus larvae
1981 - IRG/WP 1141
S Cymorek


List of Members of IRG and contributing workers proposed for membership in IRG/WP/ - I - Sub-group 5
1976 - IRG/WP 154
S Cymorek


Minutes of WG I, Sub-group 5 Insects in dry wood
1983 - IRG/WP 1220
IRG Secretariat


Questionnaire on the most important wood-destroying insects in your country and/or state
1980 - IRG/WP 1125
S Cymorek


Bifenthrin, a new insecticide for the control of termites and wood-boring insects
1995 - IRG/WP 95-30076
Bifenthrin, a new insecticidal compound Bifenthrin has been extensively tested, to determine its potential use to control termites and other wood destroying insects. Bifenthrin is effective at extreme low rates which can minimize human and environmental exposure to the product. Results of tests carried out by several research institutes and by FMC in different countries will be presented. The physical and chemical properties of bifenthrin, such as chemical stability, compatibility with fungicides, odour, vapour pressure, solubility in solvents, as well as pH-independency are favourable. In addition, several formulations are available for bifenthrin, some of which are tested in these tests. Extensive toxicological, eco-toxicological and product chemistry files have been compiled in accordance within OECD and EPA guidelines. The achieved results confirm that bifenthrin offers potential as a valuable tool for protecting wood against these pests.
G Rustenburg


Proposing innovative technologies in the control of dry-wood insects
1985 - IRG/WP 1262
This paper discusses the social-economic problems involved in the biological evaluation of dry-wood insects with particular reference to Nigeria. It also discusses prospects of applying non-conventional methods of control against such insects, integrating these with the conventional preservatives as a control strategy. This discussion follows attempts made to identify the major dry-wood insects in Nigeria as a base for raising cultures required in screening wood preservative materials. Hitherto, this allimportant aspect of wood science suffered underserved relegation in Nigeria. The commonest dry-wood insects identified so far include two species of dry-wood termites (Kalotermidae) Cryptotermes havilandi (Sjostedt) and Cryptotermes brevis (Walker); and beetles Lyctus africanus Lesne (Lyctidae), Minthea rugicollis (Walker), Bostrychoplies cornutus Olivier, Xyloperthella picea Olivier, Heterobostrychus brunneus Murray, Xyloperthodea nitidipennis Murray, and Apate spp. (Bostrychidae).
M O Akanbi


Preliminary testing of an improvised wood preservative mixture applied against dry wood beetles
1986 - IRG/WP 1308
An improvised wood preservative mixture was preliminarily tested in situ against some dry wood beetles which had infested structural timbers in a semi-finished building. The results obtained should encourage further research towards mobilizing/improvising locally available resources in the face of scarce standard wood preservatives, against the background of a dilemma in wood utilization in the developing countries.
M O Akanbi, E M Bayode, A A Alabi, J Gbadebo


A new type of biocide suitable for use in different fields of wood preservation
1993 - IRG/WP 93-30014
A new type of polymeric biocides was developed containing quaternary ammonium and boron ester groups as active structure elements, to overcome the disadvantages of AAC's in wood preservation use and to utilise their good performance due to a broad efficacy against fungi on the other hand. The new biocides called polymeric betains have been tested in laboratory and field tests and especially the didecyl substituted compound shows excellent efficacy against wood destroying and wood discolouring fungi (blue stain) and mould and against wood destroying insects including termites. The polymeric structure acts as a carrier for the quaternal ammonium salt causing excellent penetration properties and uniform dispersion in comparison with common AAC's. Fixation occurs by reaction in the pH-range of wood. For combination of polymeric betain with copper salts we found synergism against Basidiomycctes and Termites and good performance as ground contact treatment.
V Barth, H Härtner


Data sheet on wood-boring insects. Apate monachus Fabricius. 2. Position systématique, nomenclature, identification et distribution - Espèces végétales attaquée
1981 - IRG/WP 1105
R L A Damoiseau


Penichroa fasciata (Stephens) (Col. Cerambycidae) a pest in wood materials
1988 - IRG/WP 1365
Penichroa fasciata (Stephens) (Col. Cerambycidae) is found to be a frequent pest occurring in hardwood in storage in Italy. This paper reports the characteristic for identification, biological features, distribution and timber liable to attack.
A Gambetta, E Orlandi.


Über Wespen als Holzverderber - Schäden, Ursachen, Bekämpfung
1978 - IRG/WP 189
Observations and a number of actual cases over recent years show that wasps have been associated more frequently with damage to wood. The nature of such damage and the agents involved are as follows: 1. Decay following infestation by Woodwasps (Siricidae). 2. Punctate marks caused by superficial gnawing and also boring into wood by larvae of the Dock sawfly (Tenthredinidae). 3. Damage due to superficial scarification by Vespids (Vespidae). Little is known as yet of the causes of this damage and its connection with the insects. A better understanding would help in preventing damage to construction components as well as the loss of wood and would benefit the reputation of wood as a building material. Methods of prevention and control and of remedying the damage are mentioned, based on tests and practical experience.
S Cymorek


The resistance of painting materials and consolidants against wood-destroying insects
1997 - IRG/WP 97-10239
Natural and synthetic adhesives, varnishes, painting materials and consolidants were used in investigations of bioresistance against newly hatched larvae and beetles of Hylotrupes bajulus (L.). Animal glues, casein, drying oils and natural resins such as dammar resin and shellac, were not resistant to attack by these larvae. Similarly, semi- and all-synthetic polymers tested including hydroxypropylcellulose, acrylate and methacrylate compounds, are also subject to attack by newly hatched larvae of the House Longhorn Beetle. In contrast, addition of inorganic pigments provides a significant improvement in bioresistance. This effect is influenced by the thickness and the hardness of the paintlayer. The test with beetles of Hylotrupes bajulus show that the restoration materials which are not resistant against an attack by newly hatched larvae are preferred for the egg depositions by the females.
W Unger, H Fritsche, A Unger


Fluorine compounds for wood preservation
1971 - IRG/WP 304
Fluoride compounds have gained a considerable importance in wood preservation, especially in Germany and some other countries of Europe. They are used as single compounde or in mixtures of different compounds. In the International Research Group on Wood Preservation which continues the activities of a former OECD-Group, it was moved to prepare a survey on fluorides in wood preservation together with other papers on the present state of knowledge of wood preservatives and methods of application. Monofluorides and silicofluorides have been used in the field of wood preservation for about 60 years and special development and application of hydrogen fluorides have been going on for 30 years. Much scientific work has been carried out on fluorides and much experience in practical use is available. It thus seems to be useful to briefly summarise the information on this group of compounds in wood preservation. Due to the voluminous literature, ie some 270 papers which are cited in the references, only an introduction into the problems and main results but not a detailed review of the publications is possible. The subjects dealt with in the publications are indicated in the references. With some exceptions the brief survey is limited to the compounds and mixtures without chromium which remain leachable in the wood. Questions of toxicity to human beings, animals and plants are not discussed in this paper.
G Becker


Wood-destroying insects found in the Eastern Black Sea sub-region of Turkey
1982 - IRG/WP 1153
The Eastern Black Sea subregion has important forest resources. The settlement areas are scattered at the countryside. That's why a good deal of wood and timber is used in the construction of buildings without sufficient protective measures in the rural areas. In the forests and rural buildings 52 wood-destroying insect species have been specified 35 of which are new in this subregion and 14 are new in Turkey.
O A Sekendiz


Wood-attacking organisms in Brazil
1982 - IRG/WP 1168
Lists of the main wood-attacking beetles, termites, fungi and marine borers in Brazil are presented with the respective wood species from which they were collected.
M S Cavalcante


Report on Sub-group 5 in Raleigh, 6 May 1980
1980 - IRG/WP 1123
S Cymorek


Changed susceptibility of the chemically and thermally degraded spruce wood to its attack by the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans
1999 - IRG/WP 99-10322
In buildings, some intentional or unintended situations can occur at which some wood products are exposed to aggressive chemicals and also to higher temperatures. Occasional activity of fungi on such pre-attacked wood products can be either higher or lower. This paper deals with changes in the susceptibility of spruce wood (Picea abies L. Karst.) to attack by the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans, in such situations, when the wood samples 8.5x8.5x120 mm3 (RxTxL) were first pre-treated with 1% water solutions of selected acids (H2SO4, CH3COOH), bases (NaOH, NH4OH) or oxidizing agent (H2O2), or they were also exposed to a higher temperature (190°C/3h). The activity of S. lacrymans was totally restricted only in one situation, if the wood was pre-treated with sulphuric acid and then exposed to 190°C. On the other hand, specimens pre-treated with ammonium hydroxide were more susceptible to bio-attack (in both situations: without or with high temperature pre-treatment effect) than sound ones.
L Reinprecht


Report of an investigation of damage by wood ants in buildings in Sweden
1976 - IRG/WP 148
Wood ants in buildings occur everywhere in Sweden, particularly in maritime districts and in vicinity of larger lakes. The damage caused by Camponotus herculeanus does not differ from that caused by Camponotus ligniperda. The former occurs in all Sweden, the latter only in southern Sweden. The damage is to be found almost exclusively in dwelling houses (week-end cabins and "all-the-year round" houses) in or close to forests.·Buildings of all ages are liable to wood ants attacks. All wooden part of houses, particularly the walls, can be infested. Sound timber is much more desirable to the insects than wood that is infected with wood-rotting fungi. The construction of the building can sometimes affect the frequency of the damage. This is the case particularly with cabins which lack basements. The decisive part in wood ant migrations from forest to buildings is the distance from the edge of the wood: the shorter this distance the greater the danger of invasion.
V Butovitsch


Bibliography of organic solvent based wood preservatives
1971 - IRG/WP 38 E
This publication has as its objective the collection of the more important and more recent references dealing with solvent-based timber preservatives; these are often termed - sometimes wrongly - oil-borne preservatives or even organic wood preservatives. It is hoped that this review will stimulate more fundamental studies in the future in this field or on some of its aspects.
H Alliot


Data sheet on wood-boring insects: Ptilinus pectinicornis (Linnaeus)
1987 - IRG/WP 1334
S Cymorek, M-M Serment


The more important wood-destroying insects found in buildings in Poland
1974 - IRG/WP 128
In the different regions (voievodships) of the country Anobium punctatum and Anobium pertinax were to be found in the range of 47.7 to 63.5%. These insects were the main pests in urban buildings. In the second place came Hylotrupes bajulus occurring in the range of 25.9 to 45.1%. The other insects were to be found within the limits of 0.1 to 10.0%; only in a single instance did the amount reach 24.1%.
J Dominik, J Wazny, M Czajnik


The most important wood-destroying insects in various countries (Results of questionnaire)
1981 - IRG/WP 1136
M-M Serment


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