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Corrosion of fasteners in heat-treated wood – progress report after two years’ exposure outdoors
2005 - IRG/WP 05-40296
The corrosion of common fastener materials now in use - mild steel, zinc-coated steel, aluminium and Sanbond Z-coated steel – has been evaluated after two years’ exposure outdoors in untreated and heat-treated spruce (Picea abies) respectively. Spruce from South-western Sweden was used. The heat-treatment was carried out in Finland according to the ThermoWood process at a maximum temperature ...
J Jermer, B-L Andersson


Investigation of some technical properties of heat-treated wood
2003 - IRG/WP 03-40266
The objective of this study was to investigate some technical properties of heat-treated wood. Wood heat-treated according to a process intended for wood in above-ground end-uses (European hazard class 3) was subject to the following: · A delamination test according to EN 391 with glulam beams made of heat-treated pine (Pinus sylvestris) and spruce (Picea abies) laminations, assembled with PR...
C Bengtsson, J Jermer, A Clang, B Ek-Olausson


Corrosion of fasteners in treated wood
1971 - IRG/WP 303
Surveying tests for determining the corrosion rates of some metals and alloys in wood untreated as well as treated have been made. It is shown that ordinary steel corrodes faster than other common fastener metals such as copper, brass, aluminium and stainless steel do. Zinc coatings, however, will prevent the steel corrosion effectively provided that the coatings are thick sufficiently. Catalytic ...
T Wallin


Timber preservatives and corrosion
1983 - IRG/WP 3228
A survey of preservative treated timber commodities has illustrated problems that may be caused by corrosion. After treatment, timber should be compatible with commonly used fasteners. Whilst many corrosion methods have been used in the past, no standardized method is used by workers in timber preservation. The Queensland Department of Forestry is developing laboratory test methods for assessing c...
R I Davis


Metal plate fasteners in trussed rafters treated with preservatives or flame retardants - corrosion risks
1977 - IRG/WP 3104
In designing roof trusses employing metal plate fasteners it is generally assumed that the roof will remain dry in service. Whilst this is generally true, damp conditions do arise under some circumstances, although it is not possible to quantify the extent of the risk. It is only possible, therefore, to give general recommendations which must be interpreted in the light of local experience of serv...
R A Laidlaw, L C Pinion


Corrosion of metal fasteners in contact with copper preservative treated wood
2007 - IRG/WP 07-20370
The corrosion rates of metal fasteners in contact with alkaline copper quat (ACQ) treated wood with or without commercially available water repellent was compared to that of cedar. In this experiment, fasteners were sandwiched between two pieces of treated wood and exposed to a humid environment at a slightly elevated temperature. The use of a “sandwich” design allowed periodic examination of ...
BaekYong Choi, J N R Ruddick


Furfurylated wood – withdrawal load for fasteners
2007 - IRG/WP 07-40381
The withdrawal load for hot dip galvanized nails and chromated decking screws in furfurylated Baltic redwood (Pinus sylvestris) with a Weight Percent Gain (WPG) of approximately 40 % was measured according to DIN 1052. The average withdrawal loads were 60-100 % higher for the nails and approximately 20 % higher for the screws in the furfurylated wood compared to untreated wood. The results ind...
J Jermer, A Clang


Performance of Fasteners in Treated Wood: A Comparative Study
2009 - IRG/WP 09-40465
Fastener performance is an important property for treated wood. Published data on screw and nail performance for different preservative systems currently on the market are, however, limited. In this study, screw and nail withdrawal strength for southern pine wood treated with ACQ (above ground and ground contact), MCQ (above ground and ground contact), borate (disodium octaborate tetrahydrate – ...
Q Wu, T Shupe, J Curole, K Ragon, M Voitier, M Freeman, D Ring


Corrosion of fasteners in heat-treated wood – progress report after nine years’ exposure outdoors
2012 - IRG/WP 12-40601
The corrosion of common fastener materials now in use - mild steel, zinc-coated steel, aluminium and Sanbond Z-coated steel – has been evaluated after nine years’ exposure outdoors in untreated and heat-treated (thermally modified) spruce (Picea abies). Spruce from south-western Sweden was used. The heat-treatment was carried out in Finland by Stora-Enso Oy according to the ThermoWood process ...
J Jermer, B-L Andersson


Corrosion of fasteners in furfurylated wood – final report after 9 years exposure outdoors
2017 - IRG/WP 17-40810
The corrosion of some common fastener materials – mild steel, stainless steel, zinc-coated steel, brass and Sanbond Z (nickel, zinc and chromate) coated steel – has been evaluated after nine years exposure outdoors in untreated Scots pine and furfurylated beech and southern yellow pine (SYP). The furfurylation was carried out according to a process that resulted in approximately 40 % WPG (We...
J Jermer, B-L Andersson, J Schalnat